What’s Your Cardiovascular Disease Risk Important Figures to understand

 

Know Your Numbers: Your Risk for Heart Disease

Video taken from the channel: OurLadyOfTheLake


 

Know Your Heart Numbers

Video taken from the channel: NorthsideGwinnett


 

Know these numbers to prevent heart disease

Video taken from the channel: Mayo Clinic


 

Know Your Numbers for Heart Health

Video taken from the channel: Cleveland Clinic


 

How to identify heart disease risk factors and symptoms

Video taken from the channel: CBS This Morning


 

Heart Disease Risk Factors

Video taken from the channel: NIHOD


 

Controlling and Preventing Heart Disease Risk Factors

Video taken from the channel: NHLBI


What numbers do I need to know to assess my risk of heart disease? Blood Pressure. Shoot for 120/80 mm Hg. High blood pressure is referred to as the “silent killer,” because there are no symptoms. Uncontrolled, it’s a major risk for heart disease and increases your risk of developing heart disease by 25 percent.

Body Mass Index. Your lifestyle can increase your risk for heart disease. Eating a diet high in saturated fats, trans fat, and cholesterol has been linked to heart disease and related conditions, such as atherosclerosis. Also, too much salt (sodium) in the diet can raise blood pressure. Not getting enough physical activity can lead to heart disease.

1-100 indicates low to a slightly higher risk than 0. 101-400 is considered a moderate risk group. 400-plus is considered a relatively high risk for having significant blockages and coronary disease. Those numbers can tell an important story about your risk for heart disease. Heart disease is any disorder of the heart muscle, valves, rhythm or blood flow to the heart.

Today in the U.S., heart disease is the number one cause of death among both men and women. So knowing your numbers is an important part of your health story. It’s also the. Pre-hypertension is 120 to 139 (systolic) and/or 80 to 89 (diastolic). Hypertension – also known as high blood pressure is 140 or higher (systolic) and 90 or higher (diastolic).

One in three. Know Your Health Numbers | American Heart Association The American Heart Association explains the critical health numbers that someone with diabetes should know including blood sugar, blood cholesterol and body weight as well as the tools to track your numbers. High cholesterol is another heart disease risk factor that’s important to watch when you have diabetes. Total cholesterol should be below 200, with low-density lipoprotein (LDL), or “bad. Other important numbers that can provide insight into whether or not you’re at risk for heart disease down the line include your blood pressure levels and how low or high your LDLs (aka “bad”.

What’s Your Heart Disease Risk? Posted on October 26, 2018. Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women. According to the American Heart Association, “Cardiovascular disease, listed as the underlying cause of death, accounts for nearly 836,546 deaths in the US.That’s about 1 of every 3 deaths in the US.”.

The ideal is a 10-year risk that’s less than 7.5 percent. For the new study, researchers focused on the ACC/AHA calculator, which is the most commonly used. The researchers gathered health.

List of related literature:

Heart disease is the most common killer at 33 percent of all deaths, followed by cancer at 24 percent, and strokes at 7 percent.6 By keeping abreast of the current research findings, we can learn the “risk factors” associated with each disease; we can even improve our chances for continued health.

“Believing in Magic: The Psychology of Superstition” by Stuart A. Vyse
from Believing in Magic: The Psychology of Superstition
by Stuart A. Vyse
Oxford University Press, 2000

index, high cholesterol level, high blood glucose level, low fruit and vegetable intake, and physical inactivity— accounted for 60% of loss of healthy life years (DALYs) from stroke and 55% of stroke deaths in 2004.

“Stroke E-Book: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Management” by J. P. Mohr, Philip A. Wolf, Michael A. Moskowitz, Marc R Mayberg, Rudiger Von Kummer, James C. Grotta
from Stroke E-Book: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Management
by J. P. Mohr, Philip A. Wolf, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

29In the Heart Protection Study of 20536 high-risk patients (one-third had previous MI), those randomly assigned to simvastatin 40 mg daily (compared with placebo) had a 12% reduction in all-cause mortality, and 24% reduction in strokes and coronary heart disease.

“Clinical Pharmacology” by Morris J. Brown, Pankaj Sharma, Peter N. Bennett
from Clinical Pharmacology
by Morris J. Brown, Pankaj Sharma, Peter N. Bennett
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

of many other factors, not necessarily the most important one.58 I have seen many eighty-five-year-olds with cholesterol of over 300 mg/dl and normal HDL and triglycerides, with no heart disease at all and clean arteries.

“Eat Fat, Get Thin: Why the Fat We Eat Is the Key to Sustained Weight Loss and Vibrant Health” by Dr. Mark Hyman
from Eat Fat, Get Thin: Why the Fat We Eat Is the Key to Sustained Weight Loss and Vibrant Health
by Dr. Mark Hyman
Little, Brown, 2016

Figure 11.4 shows the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) in fiftyto seventyyear-old men—a rather important group, since it’s the group with the most heart attacks.

“Eat Rich, Live Long: Mastering the Low-Carb & Keto Spectrum for Weight Loss and Longevity” by Ivor Cummins, Jeffry Gerber
from Eat Rich, Live Long: Mastering the Low-Carb & Keto Spectrum for Weight Loss and Longevity
by Ivor Cummins, Jeffry Gerber
Victory Belt Publishing, 2018

When clinically evident, heart disease entails an overall poor prognosis and predicts shortened survival.118 Along with pulmonary fibrosis and PAH, cardiac disease accounts for the majority of deaths in scleroderma.

“Kelley and Firestein's Textbook of Rheumatology E-Book” by Gary S. Firestein, Ralph C. Budd, Sherine E Gabriel, Iain B. McInnes, James R O'Dell
from Kelley and Firestein’s Textbook of Rheumatology E-Book
by Gary S. Firestein, Ralph C. Budd, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

According to the American Heart Association (2010), 51% of cardiovascular disease deaths are from coronary heart disease, 17% from stroke, 7%, coronary heart disfrom heart failure, 7% from high blood pressure, and other causes constitute ease (CHD): also known the remainder (Figure 5.1).

“Stress, Health and Well-Being: Thriving in the 21st Century” by Rick Harrington
from Stress, Health and Well-Being: Thriving in the 21st Century
by Rick Harrington
Cengage Learning, 2012

When clinically evident, heart disease entails an overall poor prognosis and predicts shortened survival.22,148,149 Along with pulmonary fibrosis and PAH, cardiac disease accounts for the majority of deaths in scleroderma.

“Firestein & Kelley’s Textbook of Rheumatology E-Book” by Gary S. Firestein, Ralph C. Budd, Sherine E Gabriel, Iain B. McInnes, James R O'Dell, Gary Koretzky
from Firestein & Kelley’s Textbook of Rheumatology E-Book
by Gary S. Firestein, Ralph C. Budd, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2020

The American Heart Association has recognized the importance of these issues and has taken the position that hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, smoking, physical inactivity, and obesity are the five major risk factors for heart disease.

“Growth, Maturation, and Physical Activity” by Robert M. Malina, Claude Bouchard, Oded Bar-Or
from Growth, Maturation, and Physical Activity
by Robert M. Malina, Claude Bouchard, Oded Bar-Or
Human Kinetics, 2004

Although the original Framingham Risk Score estimated coronary heart disease risk, a new score predicting global cardiovascular disease risk (coronary heart disease, stroke, heart failure, and peripheral artery disease) has recently been published (Tables 51-2 and 51-3).

“Goldman's Cecil Medicine,Expert Consult Premium Edition Enhanced Online Features and Print, Single Volume,24: Goldman's Cecil Medicine” by Russell La Fayette Cecil, Lee Goldman, Andrew I. Schafer
from Goldman’s Cecil Medicine,Expert Consult Premium Edition Enhanced Online Features and Print, Single Volume,24: Goldman’s Cecil Medicine
by Russell La Fayette Cecil, Lee Goldman, Andrew I. Schafer
Elsevier/Saunders, 2012

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

View all posts

2 comments

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  • They only said what the symptoms are for woman. If this was the other way around the Internet would be going off! Try and be fair because I was really looking forward to answers but instead I literally just watched a sexist heart disease video.

  • This nice video provides a short description about Heart Attack Risk Factors. Heart patient must need to follow this video and I am sure they will benefited from this video. Every heart patients will take care about the risk factor showing in this video.

    I also provide natural health solution for heart patients.

    Follow @ Meschinohealth(dot)com, to know more.