What Parents Ought To Know About Coronavirus as Kids Go back to Babysitters, Day Cares and Camps

 

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What Parents Should Know About Coronavirus As Kids Return To Babysitters, Day Cares And Camps Pro Publica 5/26/2020. Clashes break out at rally in Michigan. What parents should know about coronavirus as kids return to babysitters, day cares and camps By Marshall Allen, Megan Rose and Caroline Chen, Propublica | Posted May 24, 2020 at 2:33 p.m.

What Parents Should Know About Coronavirus as Kids Return to Babysitters, Day Cares and Camps. You never planned on raising kids during a pandemic, and there are no easy decisions. What parents should know about coronavirus as kids return to babysitters, day cares and camps By Marshall Allen, Megan Rose and Caroline Chen, ProPublica | May 26, 2020 ProPublica is a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative newsroom. What Parents Should Know About Coronavirus as Kids Return to Babysitters, Day Cares and Camps Reopening states after the COVID-19 lockdown raises unnerving questions for working parents who depend on some form of child care, from nannies to day camp.

posted on 27 May 2020. What Parents Should Know About Coronavirus As Kids Return To Babysitters, Day Cares And Camps. Special Report from ProPublicathis post authored by by Marshall Allen. Make sure they understand the symptoms of Covid-19, and tell them to inform you immediately — and stay home — if they develop any symptoms, such as a fever or a cough.

What Parents Should Know About Coronavirus as Kids Return to Babysitters, Day Cares and Camps. Reopening after the COVID-19 lockdown raises questions for working parents. By: ProPublica | Jun 12, 2020.

Grandparenting. A Genius Way for Grandparents and Kids to Connect. Why grandparents and grandkids should interview each other and what to ask. What families and caregivers need to know about the CARES Act; New COVID-19 Legislation: What families and caregivers need to know (podcast) Being a professional caregiver during the COVID-19 pandemic.

6 questions nannies and sitters should ask before caring for kids during COVID-19; 6 smart things to do right now for your post-pandemic job search. Children who have COVID-19 might experience fever, cough, nasal congestion or a runny nose, sore throat, shortness of breath, diarrhea, nausea or vomiting, fatigue, headache, muscle aches, poor feeding or poor appetite, notes the CDC. That said, children with COVID-19 may not initially present with fever and cough as often as adult patients.

List of related literature:

Children in day care centers, especially children under age 3 years, have more illnesses—including diarrhea, otitis media, respiratory tract infections (especially if the caregiver smokes), hepatitis A, meningitis, and cytomegalovirus—than children cared for in their home.

“Wong's Nursing Care of Infants and Children E-Book” by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson
from Wong’s Nursing Care of Infants and Children E-Book
by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

Evidence shows that children, especially those younger than 3 years in day care centers, have more illnesses—especially diarrhea, otitis media, respiratory tract infections (especially if the caregiver smokes), hepatitis A, meningitis, and cytomegalovirus—than children cared for in their home.

“Maternal Child Nursing Care” by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, David Wilson
from Maternal Child Nursing Care
by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, et. al.
Elsevier, 2013

Evidence shows that children, especially those younger than 6 years in daycare centers, have more illnesses – especially diarrhea, otitis media, respiratory tract infections (especially if the caregiver smokes), hepatitis A, meningitis, and cytomegalovirus – than children cared for in their homes.

“Wong's Essentials of Pediatric Nursing: Second South Asian Edition” by A. Judie
from Wong’s Essentials of Pediatric Nursing: Second South Asian Edition
by A. Judie
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

Evidence shows that children, especially those younger than age 3 years in daycare centers, have more illnesses—especially diarrhea, otitis media, respiratory tract infections (especially if the caregiver smokes), hepatitis A, meningitis, and cytomegalovirus—than children cared for in their homes.

“Wong's Essentials of Pediatric Nursing9: Wong's Essentials of Pediatric Nursing” by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson, Donna L. Wong
from Wong’s Essentials of Pediatric Nursing9: Wong’s Essentials of Pediatric Nursing
by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson, Donna L. Wong
Elsevier/Mosby, 2013

Children enrolled in such settings have a higher incidence of illness (upper respiratory tract infections, otitis media, diarrhea, hepatitis A infections, skin conditions, and asthma) than those cared for at home, especially in the preschool years; these illnesses have no long-term adverse consequences.

“Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics, 2-Volume Set” by Robert M. Kliegman, MD, Bonita F. Stanton, MD, Joseph St. Geme, MD, Nina F Schor, MD, PhD
from Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics, 2-Volume Set
by Robert M. Kliegman, MD, Bonita F. Stanton, MD, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

Some disease investigations in diarrheic kids have actively screened for the presence of coronavirus as an etiologic agent.

“Goat Medicine” by Mary C. Smith, David M. Sherman
from Goat Medicine
by Mary C. Smith, David M. Sherman
Wiley, 2009

Important contacts include children who attend day care centers because they may contract rotavirus, Giardia, Shigella, Cryptosporidium, or Campylobacter.

“Primary Care Medicine: Office Evaluation and Management of the Adult Patient” by Allan H. Goroll, Albert G. Mulley
from Primary Care Medicine: Office Evaluation and Management of the Adult Patient
by Allan H. Goroll, Albert G. Mulley
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2009

The AAP website addresses numerous issues related to bioterrorism and children (http://www.aap.org), including the development of a teaching toolkit for parents to use with their children.

“Health Promotion Throughout the Life Span E-Book” by Carole Lium Edelman, Carol Lynn Mandle, Elizabeth C. Kudzma
from Health Promotion Throughout the Life Span E-Book
by Carole Lium Edelman, Carol Lynn Mandle, Elizabeth C. Kudzma
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

In addition, we investigated the effect of mothers’ malaria knowledge on their children under 5 years of age’s (U5) ITN use and their access to fever treatment on behalf of their child U5.

“Issues in Biological and Life Sciences Research: 2011 Edition” by Q. Ashton Acton, PhD
from Issues in Biological and Life Sciences Research: 2011 Edition
by Q. Ashton Acton, PhD
ScholarlyEditions, 2012

Haskins and Kotch16 first reviewed the literature (172 articles) and concluded, “Children in day care, especially those under three years old and sometimes their teachers and household contacts, have higher rates of diarrhea, hepatitis A, meningitis and possibly also otitis media than children not in day care.”

“Breastfeeding: A Guide for the Medical Profession” by Ruth A. Lawrence, MD, Robert M. Lawrence, MD
from Breastfeeding: A Guide for the Medical Profession
by Ruth A. Lawrence, MD, Robert M. Lawrence, MD
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • Think about this…..for months they told us not to wear masks….. now that all stores have them in stock, customized and price inflated….they want them to be mandatory.

  • The New Reality???
    The New Fairy Tale.
    Some of us Grown ups don’t want to pretend.
    STAND UP CANADA.
    TAKE BACK YOUR RIGHTS AND FREEDOMS.
    TAKE BACK NORMAL!!!!!

  • Attacking the elderly in care homes to children, this plandemic has killed already, not by the so called virus but by the billionaire club. EVENT 201, Dr. Bill Gates funded. This is WWlll on we the people that pay for the governments crimes! They want us dead, Trutard is an actor for his masters. Vaccine will be poison like all vaccines! This is all pure evil period, the billionaires made their fortunes off sickness, wars, corporate greed and destruction on the planet