What Every Lady Needs to understand about Cancer Of The Breast

 

Breast Cancer What every woman should know

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What Every Woman Needs to Know About Breast Cancer. One in eight women will develop breast cancer in her lifetime. According to the National Cancer Institute, symptoms of breast cancer are not usually noticeable until the tumor grows and changes how the breast looks or feels. COMMON CHANGES INCLUDE: • A lump or thickening in or near the breast or in the underarm area. What Every Woman Needs to Know about Breast Cancer Breast cancer is the most diagnosed form of cancer in women and the second leading form of cancer-related deaths in women.

Coordinated Health Breast Surgeon Cara Guilfoyle, M.D. says that women who are diagnosed with breast cancer early have the best outcomes!Breast cancer is the most common cancer in American women. 1 in 8 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer during her life. 11% of women diagnosed with breast cancer in the U.S. are younger than 45 years old.

Breast Cancer in Young Women Can Be Hereditary. Breast cancer is less common in younger women than in older women, but young women are more likely to have hereditary breast cancer. Every woman should have regular screenings as part of a healthy medical routine, and also know the red flags to be aware of. There are several symptoms that accompany breast cancer, with a primary sign being a lump in the breast or armpit and/or thickened tissue within the breast. Here are 10 facts about breast cancer every woman needs to know considering the disease affects 10-12% of women, with one in eight in the United States developing the disease.

Excluding skin cancer, breast cancer is the most common type of cancer affecting women in the US, and is the second leading cause of death following lung cancer. According to Nidhi Sharma, M.D., a breast radiologist at Cleveland Clinic, all women should at least begin talking about mammograms with their doctor by age 30. “It is so important for all women to go see their primary care physicians every year, and hold a good discussion about which testing is right for them,” she said. If an area of your breast skin looks dotted by small craters, that dimpling may indicate breast cancer. As with breast shrinkage, the tumor may be pulling on the skin, causing irregular divots.

Each woman is treated differently depending on her wishes and what will work best for her type of breast cancer. Numerous treatment options are available, and the patient will be guided on whether. One in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in her lifetime. While we can’t prevent breast cancer, we can make sure that every woman has the tools and education she needs to be proactive about her health. Packed with crucial and potentially life-saving information, What Every Woman Needs to Know about Breast Care.

And don’t ignore the warning signs of breast cancer: A new lump or mass. Although it’s more likely for the lump to be hard with irregular edges, it can be tender, soft or rounded and even painful. Swelling in either part of the breast or the entire breast—even if you can’t detect a lump.

List of related literature:

The most common metastatic cancers to involve the breast in women are, in decreasing frequency, melanoma, lymphoma, lung cancer, ovarian carcinoma, and soft tissue sarcomas, followed by gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and central nervous system tumors (Fig. 25.73).400–404

“Comprehensive Cytopathology E-Book” by Marluce Bibbo, David Wilbur
from Comprehensive Cytopathology E-Book
by Marluce Bibbo, David Wilbur
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2008

Risk perceptions and knowledge of breast cancer genetics in women at increased risk of developing hereditary breast cancer.

“Women's Health Care in Advanced Practice Nursing” by Catherine Ingram Fogel, PhD, RNC, FAAN, Nancy Fugate Woods, PhD, RN, FAAN
from Women’s Health Care in Advanced Practice Nursing
by Catherine Ingram Fogel, PhD, RNC, FAAN, Nancy Fugate Woods, PhD, RN, FAAN
Springer Publishing Company, 2008

Knowledge, satisfaction with information, decisional conflict and psychological morbidity amongst women diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS).

“Medical-Surgical Nursing: Patient-Centered Collaborative Care, Single Volume” by Donna D. Ignatavicius, M. Linda Workman, PhD, RN, FAAN
from Medical-Surgical Nursing: Patient-Centered Collaborative Care, Single Volume
by Donna D. Ignatavicius, M. Linda Workman, PhD, RN, FAAN
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

To better understand the development of breast cancer, it is important to first review the anatomy of the breast and the structures and functions of the tissues (Fig. 36.1).

“Principles of Tissue Engineering” by Robert Lanza, Robert Langer, Joseph P. Vacanti
from Principles of Tissue Engineering
by Robert Lanza, Robert Langer, Joseph P. Vacanti
Elsevier Science, 2013

What Every Woman Should Know About Breast Cancer to Save Her Life.

“Strengths-Based Nursing Care: Health And Healing For Person And Family” by Laurie N. Gottlieb, PhD, RN
from Strengths-Based Nursing Care: Health And Healing For Person And Family
by Laurie N. Gottlieb, PhD, RN
Springer Publishing Company, 2012

Most women have some knowledge of breast cancer, but may not be familiar with the details of the tests or treatments being discussed.

“Alexander's Nursing Practice E-Book: Hospital and Home The Adult” by Chris Brooker, Maggie Nicol, Margaret F. Alexander
from Alexander’s Nursing Practice E-Book: Hospital and Home The Adult
by Chris Brooker, Maggie Nicol, Margaret F. Alexander
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Breasts: Pain, tenderness, discharge, lumps, mammograms; family history of breast cancer.

“Foundations and Adult Health Nursing” by Kim Cooper, RN, MSN, Kelly Gosnell, RN, MSN
from Foundations and Adult Health Nursing
by Kim Cooper, RN, MSN, Kelly Gosnell, RN, MSN
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2014

Shocked and afraid upon learning that you have breast cancer, Chapter 4 answers all those nagging questions about the various types of breast cancer, whether it’s remained where it started or invaded other cells, and how these factors affect your treatment options and projected outcome.

“Breast Cancer For Dummies” by Ronit Elk, Monica Morrow
from Breast Cancer For Dummies
by Ronit Elk, Monica Morrow
Wiley, 2011

It is true, however, that the rates of cancer, including hormonally sensitive cancers such as breast cancers, have risen alarmingly in the past twenty years, and younger women are succumbing to these diseases.

“Bio-Young: Get Younger at a Cellular and Hormonal Level” by Roxy Dillon
from Bio-Young: Get Younger at a Cellular and Hormonal Level
by Roxy Dillon
Atria Books, 2017

Some women find it helpful and reassuring to talk to a breast cancer survivor who has undergone similar treatments.

“Brunner & Suddarth's Textbook of Medical-surgical Nursing” by Lillian Sholtis Brunner, Suzanne C. O'Connell Smeltzer, Brenda G. Bare, Janice L. Hinkle, Kerry H. Cheever
from Brunner & Suddarth’s Textbook of Medical-surgical Nursing
by Lillian Sholtis Brunner, Suzanne C. O’Connell Smeltzer, et. al.
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2010

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: kutluk[email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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