What Are You Aware About Giving OTC Medicines for your Kids

 

Giving medicines to kids Tips from a pharmacist

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A: Some of the most common childhood overdosesoccur with OTC medicines containing acetaminophen, as well as vitamin supplements with iron. Young children are curious and explore, and will swallow pills or drink a liquid when they don’t understand what it is. Do you REALLY know everything there is to know about safely giving over-the-counter medicines to your kids? You might be surprised by safety precautions you didn’t consider.

Medicine errors and misuse of commonly available OTC medications result in thousands of emergency room visits for children under the age of 18 each year. Never give ibuprofen to a baby younger than 6 months. If your child has a kidney disease, asthma, an ulcer, or another chronic (long-term) illness, ask the doctor before giving ibuprofen. Don’t give acetaminophen or ibuprofen at the same time as other OTC medicines, unless your child’s doctor says it’s OK.

7 Safety Tips for Giving OTC Medicines to Our Kids. Just like any medicine, over-the-counter medicines are serious medications. Taking more than directed can lead to an overdose. That’s why it’s so important for parents and caregivers to know how.

1. Before you give your child medicine, always read and follow the directions provided on the Drug Facts label. 2. Be sure to use the dosing or measuring device that comes with the medicine. 3. Do not use a common kitchen spoon to measure as they are not meant for measuring medicines. 4. Never use OTC medications for purposes other than those listed on the bottle.

Pretty simple, right? Sadly, some kids use OTC medications in large doses for recreational purposes. I’ve seen it, and seen the consequences. Use the dosing device that comes with the medicine.

These educational materials provide information on using over-the-counter (OTC) medicine, including the safe use of daily aspirin therapy, tips for parents, and the safe use of OTC pain relievers. OTC drugs that relieve symptoms like aches, pains, or fever (like acetaminophen and ibuprofen) should be used as your doctor recommends. Do not give cough or cold medicines to your child unless the doctor says it’s OK, especially to kids under 6 years old. These products offer little benefit to young children and can have serious side effects. It is especially important to remember this when giving medicines to children.

Giving a child the wrong dose or a medicine that is not for children can have serious side effects. The drug labels for prescription medicines have a section on “Pediatric Use.” It says whether the. As a glance at the drugstore shelves will show you, there are many, many brands of OTC cough medicines.

But there are only three basic types: Expectorants help thin mucus, making it easier to cough.

List of related literature:

If the parent wants to give the child an OTC product, remind him or her that a child who is playing and sleeping normally does not need nonprescription medicines.

“Pediatric Telephone Advice” by Barton D. Schmitt
from Pediatric Telephone Advice
by Barton D. Schmitt
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2004

Antacids and pediatric vitamins are often formulated as chewable tablets, but other formulations include antihistamines (Zyrtec), antimotility agents (Imodium Plus) and antiepileptic agents (Epanutin Infatabs), antibiotics (Augmentin Chewable), asthma treatments (Singulair), and analgesics (Motrin).

“Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Handbook: Production and Processes” by Shayne Cox Gad
from Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Handbook: Production and Processes
by Shayne Cox Gad
Wiley, 2008

The provider should ask about all current prescribed or over-the-counter (OTC) medications that the child is taking, for example, antipyretics, topical medications, and cough and cold preparations, especially those containing acetaminophen, to avoid unsafe dosing.

“Advanced Pediatric Assessment” by Ellen M. Chiocca
from Advanced Pediatric Assessment
by Ellen M. Chiocca
Lippincott William & Wilkins, 2010

Most OTC preparations for children have dosages based on the child’s weight.

“Study Guide for Pharmacology and the Nursing Process E-Book” by Linda Lane Lilley, Julie S. Snyder, Shelly Rainforth Collins
from Study Guide for Pharmacology and the Nursing Process E-Book
by Linda Lane Lilley, Julie S. Snyder, Shelly Rainforth Collins
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Then, the FDA quoted a statement by Charles Ganely, M.D., director of the FDA’s Office of Nonprescription Products, as follows: “The FDA strongly recommends to parents and caregivers that OTC cough and cold medicines not be used for children younger than 2.

“Innovation and Marketing in the Pharmaceutical Industry: Emerging Practices, Research, and Policies” by Min Ding, Jehoshua Eliashberg, Stefan Stremersch
from Innovation and Marketing in the Pharmaceutical Industry: Emerging Practices, Research, and Policies
by Min Ding, Jehoshua Eliashberg, Stefan Stremersch
Springer New York, 2013

Choosing the right OTC medicine for children is often confusing for parents.

“Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2019 E-Book: 5 Books in 1” by Fred F. Ferri
from Ferri’s Clinical Advisor 2019 E-Book: 5 Books in 1
by Fred F. Ferri
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

Medications • The provider should ask about all current prescribed or over-the-counter (OTC) medications that the child is taking, for example, antipyretics, topical medications, and cough and cold preparations, especially those containing acetaminophen, to avoid unsafe dosing.

“Advanced Pediatric Assessment, Second Edition” by Ellen Chiocca, RNC, MSN, CPNP, Ellen M. Chiocca, MSN, CPNP, APN, RNC-NIC
from Advanced Pediatric Assessment, Second Edition
by Ellen Chiocca, RNC, MSN, CPNP, Ellen M. Chiocca, MSN, CPNP, APN, RNC-NIC
Springer Publishing Company, 2014

As these medicines are appealing to children, pharmacists must advise parents about the safe storage of medicines in the home.

“Pharmaceutical Practice E-Book” by Arthur J. Winfield, Judith Rees, Ian Smith
from Pharmaceutical Practice E-Book
by Arthur J. Winfield, Judith Rees, Ian Smith
Elsevier Health Sciences UK, 2009

• Patients usually do not inform their doctors about OTC drugs they or their children may be taking.

“Death By Prescription: The Shocking Truth Behind an Overmedicated Nation” by Ray Strand
from Death By Prescription: The Shocking Truth Behind an Overmedicated Nation
by Ray Strand
Thomas Nelson, 2006

If the toddler does not like or cannot take pills, have the parent ask the pharmacist for a liquid form of the medication, which may be flavoured and may be better accepted than a pill.

“Study Guide for Pharmacology for Canadian Health Care Practice E-Book” by Linda Lane Lilley, Shelly Rainforth Collins, Julie S. Snyder, Gorospe Franklin F.
from Study Guide for Pharmacology for Canadian Health Care Practice E-Book
by Linda Lane Lilley, Shelly Rainforth Collins, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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