Weight-Loss Surgery May Raise Gallstone Risk

 

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TUESDAY, Oct. 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) The quick weight loss that occurs after bariatric surgery seems to have an unintended consequence a greater risk of gallstones. Weight-Loss Surgery May Raise Gallstone Risk: Study.

TUESDAY, Oct. 9, 2018 The quick weight loss that occurs after bariatric surgery seems to have an unintended consequence a greater risk of gallstones, a new study suggests. The rapid loss of pounds was linked to a 10-fold increase in the hospital admissions for pancreatitis, gallstones and other gallbladder conditions. TUESDAY, Oct.

9, 2018 (HealthDay News) The quick weight loss that occurs after bariatric surgery seems to have an unintended consequence a greater risk of gallstones, a new study suggests. The rapid loss of pounds was linked to a 10-fold increase in the hospital admissions for pancreatitis, gallstones and other gallbladder conditions. (HealthDay)—The quick weight loss that occurs after bariatric surgery seems to have an unintended consequence—a greater risk of gallstones, a new study suggests. Popov said the rapid weight loss is likely what triggers the gallbladder conditions, though the study did not prove that.

Victor said it’s also too soon to know why there’s an increased risk, but it could be because people are obese or it may be a technical aspect of the surgery that boosts the risk. TUESDAY, Oct. 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The quick weight loss that occurs after bariatric surgery seems to have an unintended consequence — a greater risk of gallstones, a new study suggests. The rapid loss of pounds was linked to a 10-fold increase in the hospital admissions for pancreatitis, gallstones and other gallbladder conditions. People who’d had weight-loss surgery were less likely to die, tended to stay less time in the hospital and their gallbladder disease tended to cost less to treat, the researchers said.

Dr. David Victor III, an American College of Gastroenterology expert, said it wasn’t clear before this study that bariatric surgery boosted the risk of gallstones and other gallbladder conditions. People who’d had weight-loss surgery were less likely to die, tended to stay less time in the hospital and their gallbladder disease tended to cost less to treat, the researchers said. Dr.

David Victor III, an American College of Gastroenterology expert, said it wasn’t clear before this study that bariatric surgery boosted the risk of gallstones and other gallbladder conditions. Why is the risk for gallstones higher after weight-loss surgery? After weight-loss surgery, low-calorie diets can often interfere with the production of bile. Since bile helps break down fat, this factor causes the incidence rate for gallstones to become higher.

Weight-Loss Surgery May Raise Gallstone Risk: Study. The quick weight loss that occurs after bariatric surgery seems to have an unintended consequence a greater risk of gallstones, a new study suggests. The rapid loss of pounds was linked to a 10-fold increase in the hospital admissions for pancreatitis, gallstones and other gallbladder conditions.

List of related literature:

Dieting and rapid weight loss, however, can increase the risk of gallstone formation in obese individuals—a population with an already increased risk of symptomatic and asymptomatic gallstones.

“Eating Disorders and Obesity: A Comprehensive Handbook” by Christopher G. Fairburn, Kelly D. Brownell
from Eating Disorders and Obesity: A Comprehensive Handbook
by Christopher G. Fairburn, Kelly D. Brownell
Guilford Publications, 2002

Once an individual has lost weight and maintained weight loss, the risk of gallstone formation decreases.

“Textbook of Gastroenterology” by Tadataka Yamada, David H. Alpers, Anthony N. Kalloo, Neil Kaplowitz, Chung Owyang, Don W. Powell
from Textbook of Gastroenterology
by Tadataka Yamada, David H. Alpers, et. al.
Wiley, 2011

Obesity also decreases gallbladder emptying, but sudden weight loss can also increase the risk of gallstones.

“The Treatment of Cardiovascular Diseases with Chinese Medicine: A Textbook and Clinical Manual” by Simon Becker, Bob Flaws, Robert Casañas
from The Treatment of Cardiovascular Diseases with Chinese Medicine: A Textbook and Clinical Manual
by Simon Becker, Bob Flaws, Robert Casañas
Blue Poppy Press, 2005

Although long-term weight loss and maintenance may reduce the occurrence of gallbladder disease, the risk of gallstone formation actually increases during the active weight loss phase.

“Encyclopedia of Human Nutrition” by Benjamin Caballero, Lindsay Allen, Andrew Prentice
from Encyclopedia of Human Nutrition
by Benjamin Caballero, Lindsay Allen, Andrew Prentice
Elsevier Science, 2005

Gallstones are also common among obese patients who lose weight rapidly after gastric bypass surgery.

“The Amazing Liver & Gallbladder Flush: A Powerful Do-It-Yourself Tool To Optimize Your Health and Wellbeing” by Andreas Moritz
from The Amazing Liver & Gallbladder Flush: A Powerful Do-It-Yourself Tool To Optimize Your Health and Wellbeing
by Andreas Moritz
Ener-chi Wellness Press, 2007

Although the risk of gallstones decreases with a lower body weight, weight loss, in particular rapid weight loss, increases the risk of gallbladder disease because, as lipids are released from body stores, cholesterol synthesis increases, increasing the tendency for cholesterol stone formation.

“Nutrition: Science and Applications” by Lori A. Smolin, Mary B. Grosvenor
from Nutrition: Science and Applications
by Lori A. Smolin, Mary B. Grosvenor
Wiley, 2019

Obesity is associated with a marked increase in the prevalence of gallstones, but, paradoxically, weight loss through either dieting or bariatric surgery is a risk factor for gallstone formation (Table 53.2).

“Handbook of Obesity Volume 1: Epidemiology, Etiology, and Physiopathology, Third Edition” by George A. Bray
from Handbook of Obesity Volume 1: Epidemiology, Etiology, and Physiopathology, Third Edition
by George A. Bray
CRC Press, 2014

The risk of developing gallstones after bariatric surgery appears to be related to the degree of excess weight lost, similar to findings in patients with rapid weight loss from very low-calorie diets [46, 48, 52].

“The ASMBS Textbook of Bariatric Surgery” by Ninh T. Nguyen, Stacy A. Brethauer, John M. Morton, Jaime Ponce, Raul J. Rosenthal
from The ASMBS Textbook of Bariatric Surgery
by Ninh T. Nguyen, Stacy A. Brethauer, et. al.
Springer International Publishing, 2019

Women who lose 4-10kg have a 44% increased risk of clinically relevant gallstone disease, and greater weight loss increases this risk.

“Obesity: Preventing and Managing the Global Epidemic” by World Health Organization
from Obesity: Preventing and Managing the Global Epidemic
by World Health Organization
World Health Organization, 2000

Most patients who lose significant weight will develop gallstones and, in some, cholecystectomy may be indicated at the same time as obesity surgery.

“Principles and Practice of Surgery E-Book: With STUDENT CONSULT Online Access” by O. James Garden, Andrew W. Bradbury, John L. R. Forsythe, Rowan W Parks
from Principles and Practice of Surgery E-Book: With STUDENT CONSULT Online Access
by O. James Garden, Andrew W. Bradbury, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • Pandemic got me gallstones, I don’t get it why? I’m 115 lbs, 5’4, never eat fat, no egg yolk for 20 years, few shrine a month, 1 steak a month. half a bowl of rice. I don’t drink lockdown for 2 months then I got gallstones.