Water Bottle Company Recalls Products Due to E. Coli

 

ALERT Bottled Water Recall June 2015

Video taken from the channel: h20fowler2012


 

Multiple Bottled Water Brands Recalled Due To Potential Contamination

Video taken from the channel: ABC News


 

BOTTLED WATER RECALL: Name Brands Named E-Coli Contamination

Video taken from the channel: Shakaama


 

Major supermarkets recall bottled water for potential E. coli contamination

Video taken from the channel: CBSN


 

Niagara Bottling has recalled 14 brands of bottled water Daily Mail

Video taken from the channel: Daily Mail


 

Niagara Bottling issues voluntary recall of 14 brands of bottled water

Video taken from the channel: ABC Action News


 

RECALL: These 14 brands of bottled water may contain E. coli

Video taken from the channel: WRTV Indianapolis


June 23, 2015 8:31 AM EDT A bottled water company has issued a voluntary recall over fears of E. coli contamination. After traces of E. coli bacteria. Niagara Water, a Pennsylvania company that sells bottled water under several store-brand names, is recalling some products because it may be contaminated with E. coli, the company said.The water. Bottling Company Voluntarily Recalls 14 Brands of Water Due to Possible E. Coli The affected brands include brands of Shaws, Shoprite and Wegman’s stores. The Niagara Bottling company is recalling 14 brands of its bottled water products after one spring showed signs of contamination with the E. coli bacteria, the company said in a news release.

While the company says no E. coli has been detected in any finished product, “we immediately shut down our. Niagara Bottling has recalled 14 brands of bottled spring water produced at two Pennsylvania manufacturing plants after the operator of one of its contracted springs failed to reveal evidence of E. On 22 June, 2015, Niagara Bottling issued a voluntary recall on fourteen different brands of water due to possible E. coli contamination at one of their spring sources. E. coli is spread through human and animal fecal matter, and can cause diarrhea, cramps, nausea and vomiting. The recall includes all spring water products purchased between June 10 at 3 a.m. and June 18 at 8 p.m. from the two Pennsylvania operations, and the brands affected are: Acadia, Acme, Big Y, Best Yet, 7-Eleven, Niagara, Nature’s Place, Pricerite, Superchill, Morning Fresh, Shaws, ShopRite, Western Beef Blue and Wegmans.

Stores recalling the water bottles alongside Niagara Bottling. The FDA has never mandated a bottled water recall. However, it “has issued at least three warning letters to bottled water firms for misbranded source water labels, E. coli contamination, and failure to conduct follow-up testing for E. coli contamination when coliforms are detected,” according to CR.

(CNN) An E. coli scare has prompted a California-based bottled water producer to recall some of its products. Niagara Bottling LLC said the recall is out of an abundance of caution. — Here’s how to check if bottled water in your house is part of a voluntary recall of 14 brands due to a possible E. coli contamination.

Niagara Bottling said that one of its spring sources has a “positive indication” of E. coli, which the company said indicates that the water may be contaminated with human or animal wastes.

List of related literature:

It was known best as an indicator of fecal contamination of water supplies; if water supplies contained E. coli, they were likely to contain more dangerous bacteria.

“Safe Food: Bacteria, Biotechnology, and Bioterrorism” by Marion Nestle
from Safe Food: Bacteria, Biotechnology, and Bioterrorism
by Marion Nestle
University of California Press, 2003

FDA’s final rule also amended its bottled water regulations to require, if any coliform organisms are detected in finished bottled water products, that manufacturers determine whether any of the coliform organisms are E. coli.

“The Microbiological Safety of Low Water Activity Foods and Spices” by Joshua B. Gurtler, Michael P. Doyle, Jeffrey L. Kornacki
from The Microbiological Safety of Low Water Activity Foods and Spices
by Joshua B. Gurtler, Michael P. Doyle, Jeffrey L. Kornacki
Springer New York, 2014

Further isolation of high concentrations of coagulase-positive Staphylococcus aureus and presumptive E. coli was indicative of compromised product quality.

“Listeria, Listeriosis, and Food Safety” by Elliot T. Ryser, Elmer H. Marth
from Listeria, Listeriosis, and Food Safety
by Elliot T. Ryser, Elmer H. Marth
CRC Press, 2007

Recent outbreaks provide dramatic examples of the economics of failed prevention; for example, 12.5 million dollars of apple juice were recalled following contamination of the product with Escherichia coli, and the firm, Odwalla, Inc., paid a 1.5 million dollar federal fine.

“Food Regulation: Law, Science, Policy, and Practice” by Neal D. Fortin
from Food Regulation: Law, Science, Policy, and Practice
by Neal D. Fortin
Wiley, 2016

While bacterial, viral, and parasitic pathogens are all causative agents of these diarrheal illnesses, the various kinds of diarrheagenic E. coli are responsible for a significant proportion of the diarrheal illnesses caused by bacteria.

“Public Health and Infectious Diseases” by Davidson H. Hamer, Jeffrey Griffiths, James H. Maguire, Kristian Heggenhougen, Stella R. Quah
from Public Health and Infectious Diseases
by Davidson H. Hamer, Jeffrey Griffiths, et. al.
Elsevier Science, 2010

The E. coli was distributed to restaurants over a four-state area in the northwest United States, infecting approximately 700 persons and causing two deaths.

“Infection Control and Management of Hazardous Materials for the Dental Team E-Book” by Chris H. Miller, Charles John Palenik
from Infection Control and Management of Hazardous Materials for the Dental Team E-Book
by Chris H. Miller, Charles John Palenik
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

Demonstration of E. coli in water samples indicates contamination with intestinal content and bacteria, among which could be pathogens, so that protective measures should be taken.

“General Microbiology” by Hans G. Schlegel, C. Zaborosch, M. Kogut
from General Microbiology
by Hans G. Schlegel, C. Zaborosch, M. Kogut
Cambridge University Press, 1993

Because E. coli O157:H7 was truly a new pathogen at this time, the requirement to test for generic E. coli was based on the fact that the presence of E. coli was an indication of fecal contamination, which could result in the transmission of pathogens.

“Encyclopedia of Food Microbiology” by Richard K. Robinson, Carl A. Batt
from Encyclopedia of Food Microbiology
by Richard K. Robinson, Carl A. Batt
Elsevier Science, 2014

This in turn may lead to deterioration of the product, and possibly may present a public health hazard through the growth and multiplication of dangerous microbes such as Listeria spp. and Escherichia coli.

“Environmentally Compatible Food Packaging” by E. Chiellini
from Environmentally Compatible Food Packaging
by E. Chiellini
Elsevier Science, 2008

The distribution of E. coli in the environment is determined by its presence in the bowel of humans and animals; its presence in water supplies is an indication of recent fecal contamination and the potential presence of enteric pathogens.

“Foodborne Bacterial Pathogens” by Michael Doyle
from Foodborne Bacterial Pathogens
by Michael Doyle
Taylor & Francis, 1989

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

View all posts

Add comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *