Vegetables in early childhood Will Benefit Breast Health

 

Can A Woman’s Diet During Childhood Effect Her Risk For Breast Cancer?

Video taken from the channel: Breast Cancer Answers®


 

Vegetables versus breast cancer

Video taken from the channel: NutritionFacts.org


 

7 Omega 3 Benefits Plus Top 9 Omega 3 Foods

Video taken from the channel: TheSeriousfitness


 

Early Puberty and Breast Cancer | Cincinnati Children’s

Video taken from the channel: Cincinnati Children’s


 

Health Benefits Of Weird Veggies You May Probably Never Heard Of.

Video taken from the channel: Be Healthy


 

Benefits of Cabbage Leaves for Relief of Engorged Breasts

Video taken from the channel: NutritionFacts.org


 

High fruit and vegetable consumption may reduce risk of breast cancer

Video taken from the channel: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health


Vegetables in Childhood May Benefit Breast Health Girls who ate carotenoid-rich foods less likely to have breast conditions, study finds From the WebMD Archives. FRIDAY, April 11, 2014 (HealthDay News) Girls who ate the most fruits and vegetables rich in carotenoids were less likely to get benign breast disease, a new study suggests. Carotenoids are a group of pigments that typically produce an orange, red or dark green color.

They are believed to have antioxidant properties that may guard against disease. FRIDAY, April 11, 2014 (HealthDay News) Girls who ate the most fruits and vegetables rich in carotenoids were less likely to get benign breast disease, a new study suggests. Carotenoids are a group of pigments that typically produce an orange, red or dark green color. Vegetables in Childhood May Benefit Breast Health Girls who ate the most fruits and vegetables rich in carotenoids were less likely to get benign breast disease, a new study suggests. Carotenoids are a group of pigments that typically produce an orange, red or dark green color.

Foods rich in vitamin C include broccoli, sweet peppers, spinach, strawberries, tomatoes, Brussels sprouts and citrus fruits. Spinach, asparagus, broccoli and orange juice are excellent sources of folic acid. But, despite the benefits, not all vegetables and fruits, young mothers can eat. Kale is a very popular leafy green vegetable with several health benefits. It provides 7 calories per cup of raw leaves and good amounts of vitamins A, C, and K..

Kale may benefit. One of the main health benefits of vegetables is their high nutrient content. Vegetables are loaded with vitamins and minerals that contribute to growth and the maintenance of good health. For example, the U.S.

Department of Agriculture notes that many vegetables are high in potassium, which is important for healthy blood pressure. The items that seemed to offer the greatest benefits included apples, pears, oranges and other citrus fruits, green leafy vegetables, cruciferous vegetables (such as broccoli, cabbage, and cauliflower), and green and yellow vegetables (such as green beans, carrots, and peppers). So, learn to know more about the health benefits of the skinless chicken breast here. Boneless and skinless chicken breast is lean protein and its tasty once it is cooked. It benefits your health in so many ways.

So, learn to know more about the health benefits of the skinless chicken breast here. Now, let’s have a look at some of the. A child who makes the green beans himself may be more likely to eat them, notes an article by Elizabeth Cohen, CNN senior medical correspondent. Sneak pureed vegetables into your children’s favorite foods and stock kid-level shelves in the fridge with baggies of cut-up veggies and fruits and fruit cups.

Shop organic if you can.

List of related literature:

High intakes of fruits and vegetables have been shown to reduce risk of breast cancer in some epidemiological studies.

“Nutritional Oncology” by David Heber, George L. Blackburn, Vay Liang W. Go, John Milner
from Nutritional Oncology
by David Heber, George L. Blackburn, et. al.
Elsevier Science, 2011

Some studies have shown that cruciferous vegetables may also help prevent breast and prostate cancer, but currently the data remain inconsistent and indefinite.

“Medical Nutrition and Disease: A Case-Based Approach” by Lisa Hark, Darwin Deen, Gail Morrison
from Medical Nutrition and Disease: A Case-Based Approach
by Lisa Hark, Darwin Deen, Gail Morrison
Wiley, 2014

In experimental studies, several vegetables, especially cruciferous vegetables, have shown inhibitory effect on breast cancer cells.

“Nutraceuticals in Veterinary Medicine” by Ramesh C. Gupta, Ajay Srivastava, Rajiv Lall
from Nutraceuticals in Veterinary Medicine
by Ramesh C. Gupta, Ajay Srivastava, Rajiv Lall
Springer International Publishing, 2019

In 2001, a report from a case control study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association showed that eating lots of cruciferous veggies led to a lower risk of breast cancer.

“Nutrition For Dummies” by Carol Ann Rinzler
from Nutrition For Dummies
by Carol Ann Rinzler
Wiley, 2016

Consumption of soy, fruits, and vegetables helps reduce the risk of breast cancer, according to a study published in the March 2010 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

“The Food Revolution: How Your Diet Can Help Save Your Life and Our World” by John Robbins, Dean Ornish
from The Food Revolution: How Your Diet Can Help Save Your Life and Our World
by John Robbins, Dean Ornish
Mango Media, 2010

It was further shown that mothers reporting higher levels of concern for healthful eating had higher intakes of fruits, vegetables, and dairy products.

“Bioactive Foods in Promoting Health: Fruits and Vegetables” by Ronald Ross Watson, Victor R. Preedy
from Bioactive Foods in Promoting Health: Fruits and Vegetables
by Ronald Ross Watson, Victor R. Preedy
Elsevier Science, 2009

Hence, the results suggested that a modest reduction in fat intake and increase in fruit, vegetable, and grain intake do not alter the risk of benign proliferative breast disease.

“A Guide to Evidence-based Integrative and Complementary Medicine” by Vicki Kotsirilos, Luis Vitetta, Avni Sali
from A Guide to Evidence-based Integrative and Complementary Medicine
by Vicki Kotsirilos, Luis Vitetta, Avni Sali
Elsevier Health Sciences APAC, 2011

Several epidemiologic studies have examined the association between vegetable and fruit intake and risk for primary breast cancer.

“Principles of Gender-specific Medicine” by Marianne J. Legato, John P. Bilezikian
from Principles of Gender-specific Medicine
by Marianne J. Legato, John P. Bilezikian
Elsevier Academic Press, 2004

Intake of cruciferous vegetables during breast feeding has, however, been associated with colic symptoms in young infants (41).

“Handbook of Vegetable Science and Technology: Production, Compostion, Storage, and Processing” by D. K. Salunkhe, S. S. Kadam
from Handbook of Vegetable Science and Technology: Production, Compostion, Storage, and Processing
by D. K. Salunkhe, S. S. Kadam
Taylor & Francis, 1998

The nutritional treatment of breast cancer includes the cancer preventive recommendations, especially the inclusion of the cabbage family vegetables with the indole-3-carbinol phytochemicals.

“Intelligent Medicine” by Ronald L. Hoffman
from Intelligent Medicine
by Ronald L. Hoffman
Touchstone, 1997

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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4 comments

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  • Missed out there!
    Third,
    (First in India),

    Peter Rabitt,
    Keep your eyes off those cabbage leaves they’re NOT for you!
    (Unless you’ve got engorged breasts)

  • I’d like to see a video on black seed oil. It’s all the rage these days. search “black seed oil” on youtube and there are loads of videos with huge comment sections praising it’s effects on everything from sleep, depression, to reversing hair loss. search “black seed oil pubmed” on google and there are several studies suggesting positive results on a plethora of conditions. I’ve never tried it but it’s piqued my interest for sure.

  • Some women have found relief using the concentrated brassica vegetable extract known as I3C.
    MishyD
    5.0 out of 5 starsAmazing product worked wonders for me.
    May 3, 2018
    Package Type: Standard Packaging|Verified Purchase
    Cured my hot flashes before I even finished the bottle! Fantastic!!!

    Elizabeth
    5.0 out of 5 starsIt has helped reduce estrogen-related symptoms better than anything else I’ve tried
    September 16, 2017
    Package Type: Standard Packaging|Verified Purchase
    I only wish I’d known about I-3-C sooner. It has helped reduce estrogen-related symptoms better than anything else I’ve tried. These capsules are also easy to take.

    Bridget Driggers
    5.0 out of 5 starsFive Stars
    March 17, 2017
    Package Type: Standard Packaging|Verified Purchase
    My doctor recommended this to counteract breast disease while taking natural hormone replacement. I highly recommend!

    SD

    starsI think it’s working we’ll find out when my next tests come in
    August 21, 2013
    Package Type: Standard Packaging|Verified Purchase
    I have to take this stuff because I got my hormones tested, and my estrone levels are a bit high compared to my estriol. My naturalpath got me to take DIM, but they don’t make DIM without soy (which I am allergic to). So I started taking this. I think it is working but we’ll know for sure when my tests come in. The great thing is, there’s no soy in this product. Hallaluyeh!

  • Thanks for covering this topic. Last year I had miserably tender breasts because of perimenopause causing hormones to be out of whack. I had read about using cabbage leaves on the breasts, so I gave it a try. I steamed the cabbage leaves, not knowing if they should be cooked or uncooked, and I didn’t know how long to leave them on. In the end, it didn’t seem to help, but I’ve been interested to know if it works for other people.