UPDATE Enterovirus Reported in 42 States

 

Enterovirus 68/EV-D68: Mystery virus spreading across the country, affecting children

Video taken from the channel: WCPO 9


 

NH health officials say Enterovirus has spread

Video taken from the channel: WMUR-TV


 

5. Enterovirus clinical manifestations including poliore

Video taken from the channel: RWJF Microbiology, Immunology & Infectious Diseases


 

Respiratory virus seen in four deaths; role

Video taken from the channel: LOCAL 12


 

Bay Area Health Officials Confirm First Cases Of Enterovirus D68

Video taken from the channel: KPIX CBS SF Bay Area


 

How worried should we be about Enterovirus D68?

Video taken from the channel: CBS This Morning


 

Enterovirus cases spread to 43 states

Video taken from the channel: CBS This Morning


Infectious diseases expert Dr. Mary Schmidt weighs in Fears of enterovirus D68 and what it could mean for children are spreading nearly as quickly as the respiratory illness. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates 10 to 15 million infections occur in the United States each year. However, this type of Enterovirus – Enterovirus D68, first identified in California in 1962 that has not been commonly reported since then – appears to be exacerbating breathing problems in children with asthma.

A new report published in MMWR describes cases of neurologic disease associated with enterovirus A71 among children in Colorado in 2018. Read the report. Coxsackievirus A6 was the most commonly reported type of enterovirus in this country from 2009 to 2013, mostly due to a large outbreak in 2012 of severe hand, foot, and mouth disease. In 2018, there were 238 total confirmed cases in 42 states. One of the confirmed cases is a foreign resident (based on the country of usual residence) and therefore not included in the state map.

Echovirus 9 was the most commonly reported enterovirus in the United States during 1970-2005, accounting for 11.8% of reports with known serotype. Echovirus 9 has a distinct epidemic pattern of circulation, with regular sharp increases in reports every 3-5 years. In summer and fall 2014, the United States experienced a nationwide outbreak of EV-D68 associated with severe respiratory illness. From mid-August 2014 to January 15, 2015, CDC or state public health laboratories confirmed 1,395 people in 49 states and the District of Columbia with respiratory illness caused by EV-D68. Enterovirus D68 is sending hundreds of children to the hospital. Learn more about the respiratory illness caused by this virus. Enterovirus type 71 (EV71) is a member of the human enterovirus species A, and of the family Picornaviridae.In 1969, EV71 was first isolated in California, United States; and was first recognized as a cause of epidemics of hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) in Japan in 1973 [1, 2].EV71, a major pathogen, is responsible for HFMD and has been associated with severe neurological.

Enterovirus is a genus of positive-sense single-stranded RNA viruses associated with several human and mammalian diseases. Enteroviruses are named by their transmission-route through the intestine (enteric meaning intestinal). it has been rarely reported in the U.S. in the past 40 years. Most people who get infected are infants, children.

Alternate Text: The figure above shows occurrence of human enterovirus 68, by month and geographic location in Asia, Europe, and the United States during 2008–2010. Classic enteroviruses have prominent summer-fall (July–November) seasonality in temperate climates and outbreaks of enteroviruses tend to occur in several-year cycles.

List of related literature:

In the United States, 77.9 % of enterovirus cases were reported from June to October [113].

“Viral Infections of Humans: Epidemiology and Control” by Richard A. Kaslow, Lawrence R. Stanberry, James W. Le Duc
from Viral Infections of Humans: Epidemiology and Control
by Richard A. Kaslow, Lawrence R. Stanberry, James W. Le Duc
Springer US, 2014

Enterovirus A6 has become more prevalent in the United States.4 Enterovirus A6 infection often manifests with more exuberant HFMD, with larger and more widespread vesicles and bullae that also can occur

“Principles and Practice of Pediatric Infectious Diseases E-Book” by Sarah S. Long, Charles G. Prober, Marc Fischer
from Principles and Practice of Pediatric Infectious Diseases E-Book
by Sarah S. Long, Charles G. Prober, Marc Fischer
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

• Enterovirus 71 infection rates have been rising in the Asian Pacific region.

“Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2012: 5 Books in 1, Expert Consult Online and Print” by Fred F. Ferri
from Ferri’s Clinical Advisor 2012: 5 Books in 1, Expert Consult Online and Print
by Fred F. Ferri
Elsevier Health Sciences Division, 2011

The estimated annual incidence of symptomatic enterovirus infections in the United States is 10 to 15 million, with most cases affecting infants and young children.

“Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology” by Brad W. Neville, DDS, Douglas D. Damm, DDS, Carl M. Allen, DDS, MSD, Angela C. Chi, DMD
from Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology
by Brad W. Neville, DDS, Douglas D. Damm, DDS, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

Update on enterovirus infec

“Greenfield's Neuropathology Two Volume Set” by Seth Love, Arie Perry, James Ironside, Herbert Budka
from Greenfield’s Neuropathology Two Volume Set
by Seth Love, Arie Perry, et. al.
CRC Press, 2018

The number of individual enterovirus strains now recognized is greater than 120.

“Hunter's Tropical Medicine and Emerging Infectious Diseases E-Book” by Edward T Ryan, David R Hill, Tom Solomon, Timothy P Endy, Naomi Aronson
from Hunter’s Tropical Medicine and Emerging Infectious Diseases E-Book
by Edward T Ryan, David R Hill, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

There was a recent outbreak of enterovirus type 71 in Colorado.

“Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2019 E-Book: 5 Books in 1” by Fred F. Ferri
from Ferri’s Clinical Advisor 2019 E-Book: 5 Books in 1
by Fred F. Ferri
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

Enterovirus An estimated 10 to 15 million clinical enteroviral infections (Chapter 387) occur annually in the United States, and these include an estimated 50,000 to 75,000 cases of enteroviral meningitis.

“Goldman's Cecil Medicine,Expert Consult Premium Edition Enhanced Online Features and Print, Single Volume,24: Goldman's Cecil Medicine” by Russell La Fayette Cecil, Lee Goldman, Andrew I. Schafer
from Goldman’s Cecil Medicine,Expert Consult Premium Edition Enhanced Online Features and Print, Single Volume,24: Goldman’s Cecil Medicine
by Russell La Fayette Cecil, Lee Goldman, Andrew I. Schafer
Elsevier/Saunders, 2012

In 1970, polioviruses accounted for only 6% of the total enterovirus isolations from patients with neurologic illnesses [330].

“Infectious Diseases of the Fetus and Newborn E-Book” by Jack S. Remington, Christopher B. Wilson, Victor Nizet, Jerome O. Klein, Yvonne Maldonado
from Infectious Diseases of the Fetus and Newborn E-Book
by Jack S. Remington, Christopher B. Wilson, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

Although HFMD generally runs a benign and self-limited course, since 1998 there have been multiple outbreaks of severe enterovirus 71 infection in the Asia-Pacific region, which have resulted in cardiopulmonary and neurologic complications and even deaths in affected individuals (primarily young children)3.

“Dermatology E-Book” by Jean L. Bolognia, Joseph L. Jorizzo, Julie V. Schaffer
from Dermatology E-Book
by Jean L. Bolognia, Joseph L. Jorizzo, Julie V. Schaffer
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • I have that too but I don’t think so unless the lunges hurt ;/ I’m scared but not to scared unless it’s hard to breath and if it becomes fever like