Understanding Parkinson’s Disease Psychosis

 

Hope is here for Parkinson’s disease patients with psychosis

Video taken from the channel: Kansas City Star


 

Treating Psychosis in Patients With Parkinson’s Disease

Video taken from the channel: HCPLive


 

Psychosis in Parkinson’s Disease Patients

Video taken from the channel: Rare Disease Report


 

Expert Briefing Webinar: Parkinson’s Disease Psychosis: Hallucinations, Delusions & Paranoia

Video taken from the channel: Parkinson’s Foundation


 

Understanding Hallucinations in Parkinson’s Disease

Video taken from the channel: Care New England


 

Parkinson’s Disease Psychosis: A Caregiver’s Story

Video taken from the channel: Parkinson’s Foundation


 

Understanding Parkinson’s Disease Psychosis

Video taken from the channel: Neurology Advisor


Psychosis is a more severe symptom in which people lose touch with reality. Between 20 and 40 percent of people with Parkinson’s disease have symptoms of psychosis. As Parkinson’s Disease progresses, up to 40 percent of the approximately one million Americans living with the illness will develop psychotic symptoms, primarily hallucinations, but also delusions.

These symptoms can be an indication of Parkinson’s disease psychosis (PDP), but unfortunately, many patients are not diagnosed. Understanding Parkinson’s Disease Psychosis. If you are the caregiver of someone with Parkinson’s disease (PD), you are likely well aware of the common motor symptoms associated with the condition, like tremors. However, you may not be aware that non-motor symptoms (those unrelated to physical movement), such as psychosis, commonly develop as the disease progresses.

Understanding Parkinson’s Disease Psychosis Hallucinations and delusions are symptoms of Parkinson’s disease psychosis, which occurs in about 50 percent of people with PD at some point during their illness. Causes of Parkinson disease psychosis The cause of hallucinations and delusions associated with Parkinson’s is not clearly understood. The drugs commonly used to treat Parkinson’s disease, which raise dopamine levels to improve motor control, can cause physical and chemical changes in the brain that may lead to hallucinations and delusions. Hallucinations and delusions like these are symptoms of Parkinson’s disease psychosis, which occurs in about 50 percent of people with PD at some point during their illness.

Sometimes described as “tricks” played by the brain, hallucinations can cause a person to see, hear, feel, smell or even taste something that isn’t real. As PD progresses, up to 40 percent of the approximately one million Americans living with the illness will develop psychotic symptoms, primarily hallucinations, but also delusions. These symptoms can be an indication of Parkinson’s disease psychosis (PDP), but unfortunately, many patients are not diagnosed. What Triggers Psychosis in Parkinson’s Disease “There are many potential triggers for hallucinations or other psychotic phenomena and these include. Treating Psychosis.

Treating Parkinson’s disease psychosis is a multi-step process that begins with talking to your health care team. They will follow a series of steps to figure out how best to address your symptoms. Step 1. The first step is to perform a clinical evaluation of your symptoms considering prior history, disease stage, and available support systems.

Psychosis: A Mind Guide to Parkinson’s Disease As part of the Parkinson’s Foundation’s Educational Book Series, Psychosis discusses just that: the causes, symptoms and treatments for hallucinations and delusions, as well as tips for caregivers of someone experiencing psychosis.

List of related literature:

Anxiety, depression, apathy, psychosis and cognitive impairment, including dementia, are well‐recognised neuropsychiatric syndromes of Parkinson’s disease.

“Neurology: A Queen Square Textbook” by Charles Clarke, Robin Howard, Martin Rossor, Simon Shorvon
from Neurology: A Queen Square Textbook
by Charles Clarke, Robin Howard, et. al.
Wiley, 2016

Subcortical dementia – Dementia syndromes characterized by greater deficits in executive function, attention, and processing speed; related to disruption of frontal–striatal circuitry; examples include Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, and progressive supranuclear palsy.

“Encyclopedia of Movement Disorders” by Katie Kompoliti, Leonard Verhagen
from Encyclopedia of Movement Disorders
by Katie Kompoliti, Leonard Verhagen
Elsevier Science, 2010

These diagnoses and conditions include advanced dementia and other progressive neurological diseases such as Parkinson’s disease and multiple sclerosis, cerebrovascular disease, psychosis and delirium.

“Lewis's Medical-Surgical Nursing EBook: Assessment and Management of Clinical Problems” by Di Brown, Helen Edwards, Thomas Buckley, Robyn L. Aitken
from Lewis’s Medical-Surgical Nursing EBook: Assessment and Management of Clinical Problems
by Di Brown, Helen Edwards, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Psychosis in Parkinson’s disease is often characterised by visual hallucinations.25 Auditory hallucinations and delusions occur far less frequently,26 and usually in younger patients.27 Psychosis and dementia frequently co-exist.

“The Maudsley Prescribing Guidelines in Psychiatry” by David Taylor, Carol Paton, Shitij Kapur
from The Maudsley Prescribing Guidelines in Psychiatry
by David Taylor, Carol Paton, Shitij Kapur
Wiley, 2015

Both DLB and PDD also tend to have prominent psychiatric disturbance, sleep disorders, autonomic instability, and marked sensitivity to antipsychotics in terms of motor side effects (see Chap.

“Neuropalliative Care: A Guide to Improving the Lives of Patients and Families Affected by Neurologic Disease” by Claire J. Creutzfeldt, Benzi M. Kluger, Robert G. Holloway
from Neuropalliative Care: A Guide to Improving the Lives of Patients and Families Affected by Neurologic Disease
by Claire J. Creutzfeldt, Benzi M. Kluger, Robert G. Holloway
Springer International Publishing, 2018

Cognitive, psychiatric and motor response to galantamine in Parkinson’s disease with dementia.

“Parkinson's Disease: Diagnosis and Clinical Management” by Dr. Stewart A. Factor, DO, Dr. William Weiner, MD
from Parkinson’s Disease: Diagnosis and Clinical Management
by Dr. Stewart A. Factor, DO, Dr. William Weiner, MD
Springer Publishing Company, 2007

Neuroleptic malignant-like syndrome in Parkinson’s disease due to dopaminergic drug withdrawal.

“Living with Chronic Illness and Disability EBook: Principles for Nursing Practice” by Esther Chang, Amanda Johnson
from Living with Chronic Illness and Disability EBook: Principles for Nursing Practice
by Esther Chang, Amanda Johnson
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

Anxiety, depression, and psychosis in Parkinson’s disease: unmet needs and treatment challenges.

“Therapy of Movement Disorders: A Case-Based Approach” by Stephen G. Reich, Stewart A. Factor
from Therapy of Movement Disorders: A Case-Based Approach
by Stephen G. Reich, Stewart A. Factor
Springer International Publishing, 2019

Effects of rivastigmine in patients with and without visual hallucinations in dementia associated with Parkinson’s disease.

“New Oxford Textbook of Psychiatry” by John R. Geddes, Nancy C. Andreasen, Guy M. Goodwin
from New Oxford Textbook of Psychiatry
by John R. Geddes, Nancy C. Andreasen, Guy M. Goodwin
Oxford University Press, 2020

Thompson PD, Berardelli A, Rothwell JC, et al: The coexistence of bradykinesia and chorea in Huntington’s disease and its implications for theories of basal ganglia control of movement, Brain 111:223-244, 1988.

“Physical Rehabilitation E-Book: Evidence-Based Examination, Evaluation, and Intervention” by Michelle H. Cameron, Linda Monroe
from Physical Rehabilitation E-Book: Evidence-Based Examination, Evaluation, and Intervention
by Michelle H. Cameron, Linda Monroe
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2007

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

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Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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31 comments

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  • My husband was diagnosed of Parkinsons disease 2 years ago, when he was 49. He had a stooped posture, tremors, right arm does not move and also a pulsating feeling in his body. He was placed on Senemet for 8 months and then Siferol was introduced and replaced the Senemet, during this time span he was also diagnosed with dementia. He started having hallucinations, lost touch with reality. Suspecting it was the medication I took him off the Siferol (with the doctor’s knowledge) and started him on PD natural herbal formula we ordered from AKANNI HERBAL CENTRE, his symptoms totally declined over a 3 weeks use of the AKANNI HERBAL Parkinsons disease natural herbal formula. He is now almost 51 and doing very well, the disease is totally reversed!  (Visit www. akanniherbalcentre.com)

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  • My husband and I are going through the same problems that you are experiencing. When I spoke to our Neurologist about this, he looked at me for a minute or so and never said a word to me about the problem. It helps to hear from people who understand. Thanks for sharing.

  • Thank you for your story, I am a nurse and take care of a man with Parkinson’s disease. He has hallucinations, delusions, and paranoia, some days can be extrmely difficult. He has been on Nuplazid and after a year it stopped working, now he is on clozaril and seoquel but they are so sedating for him. So he takes them at bedtime only. May God bless you for sharing your story. People think I make up yhese stories. He accuses to of many things and I cry. I know he can not help it. Thanks again ��

  • I remember taking my Mom to the neurologist and him asking if she was having any hallucinations…She said no…I said but what about the children and animals you see? Her response…I thought hallucinations were scary. In the later stages of my Mom’s life I found the best way to deal with her hallucinations was to play along with whatever she said and reassure her. Worst part of my Mom’s condition were the internal tremors she suffered with. She described them as feeling like snakes crawling inside her body. I spent many times crying because there was nothing I could do to relieve these symptoms.

  • My father has been hallucinating for long. Now he is devastated and literally statrted believing them as the real ones. Also life threatening. We are devastated by making him understand that they are not real.

  • My husband was diagnosed of Parkinsons disease 2 years ago, when he was 49. He had a stooped posture, tremors, right arm does not move and also a pulsating feeling in his body. He was placed on Senemet for 8 months and then Siferol was introduced and replaced the Senemet, during this time span he was also diagnosed with dementia. He started having hallucinations, lost touch with reality. Suspecting it was the medication I took him off the Siferol (with the doctor’s knowledge) and started him on PD natural herbal formula we ordered from AKANNI HERBAL CENTRE, his symptoms totally declined over a 3 weeks use of the AKANNI HERBAL Parkinsons disease natural herbal formula. He is now almost 51 and doing very well, the disease is totally reversed!  (Visit www. akanniherbalcentre.com)

  • parkinsons is a horrible disease. i miss my grandmother, this person we have with us today is not the grandmother she used to be.:(

  • IN TEARS…..: ( I recently found out my mother has advanced Parkinson’s disease. THANK YOU SO MUCH for sharing your story. Much love!

  • My Parkinsons disease symptoms started at the age of 54. My fingers on my left hand were stiff and were difficult to move. People noticed that my walk was not normal, I was often asked did I hurt. It was difficult getting up from` a chair and getting out of a car. I was diagnosed a year later, all medications my doctor prescribed did more harm than good. In November, 2016 I started on NewLife Herbal Clinic Parkinson disease natural herbal remedy treatment, my parkinsons symptoms including tremors, slowed movement, shaking deteriorated over the first 9 weeks of the PD herbal formula usage, i am now 59 with no trace of Parkinsons or tremors, visit the clinic website www. newlifeherbalclinic. com or email info @ newlifeherbalclinic. com. The PD herbal formula helped me in a way i just didn’t imagine, this is a breakthrough for all parkinsons disease patients.

    George Herrmann
    Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

  • My mom’s had parkinsons’ for over 20+yrs. Hallucinations have got more extreme,she’s used a spray bottle to kill spiders she sees on the ceiling, fallen trying to get away from tigers. She is so afraid! I’ve slept with her in her twin sized bed.So I can be close.Even tho I have baby monitors in our rooms! She has made the decision not to attend church,because she needs constant help! Church was her main social circle of people to see and be with. She has recently started taking Quetiapine,and stopped her Mirapex.The side affects on the bottle are enough to frighten me. With her lack of sleep,and how bad her hallucinations are. I am so afraid of her pacemaker being changed out at the end of this month! She is a wonderful lady, it’s difficult to watch her not being able to do crafts/draw anymore.Use her hands to simply put in a dvd. Bless the inventor of kindle fire. She uses one finger to play many games,she really enjoys that! Our vacations are the local department store, and going out to eat! And any outing is considered on her strength to be able to stay out! It is a difficult and cruel disease! I pray for you and your husband’ s continued strength!

  • I am just about having to give up caring for my nearly 90 year old mum:(
    The paranoia that comes with her hallucinations are nothing less than terrible,,, terrible for her,, & terrible for me…
    I have had to hide the phone from her as she calls the police all the time about “Those strange men in the house, they scare me so much”!
    To have your wonderful mother suddenly accuse you of “Leaving me with all those scary people, please don’t make me have to do that again”!!
    This is just the tiniest bit of the tip of the iceberg. And this breaks my heart…
    We live 20 miles away from a large country town (Grafton NSW Australia) & the closest ‘specialist’ is at Coffs Harbor, well over an hours drive away, & it’s not a drive I can do with my mother anymore in her paranoid & ill condition as she is almost completely crippled.
    No one can help, no one understands except for my mothers Doctor (a wonderful lady but her hands are bound regarding medications because she is not a ‘specialist’ & my mother cannot be taken to one so far away and ffs, the specialist, of all bloody people, should understand this!).
    This really makes one feel like just giving up,, it’s living moment by moment with her, with both of us sinking lower & lower, just struggling to get through each day.
    Parkinsons is one of the most insidiously disgusting diseases,, ever..!…

  • NUPLAZID® (pimavanserin) is the first and only medication approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of hallucinations and delusions associated with Parkinson’s disease psychosis.

  • Thank you so much for sharing. My dad’s had Parkinson’s for a few years now and he’s been seeing tigers in the corners of his eyes. Sometimes he wakes up dreaming that tigers are attacking him. He’s asked me what that’s all about and I told him I didn’t know, but now I can tell him. It’ll make him feel better, I hope.

  • My father was diagnosed with Parkinsons’s about three years ago, and the amount that his mind has changed since that time is unfathomable. My father has literally gone from being one of the most proactive hard-working people I know to someone who is always criticizing others, paranoid and borderline suicidal. On the worst days, I break down crying, wishing that I could have my dad back. I begged my father to seek therapy and treatment for his mental health, but he refuses and yells at me that I’m not his guardian. Watching this video brought me a small sense of comfort, because it reminded me that we are not alone. Thank you.

  • Thank you for sharing. Diane. We have been going through a tough time the last couple of months with severe hallucinations and delusions, which are now much less severe after discontinuing use of an antidepressant. But now at least after your video I know what to address with his neurologist on our next visit. But yes, it’s a difficult journey for us caregivers as well.

  • Thank you for this video. I ‘m my father’s caregiver. The doctors said it was alzheimer’s and dementia. This is so very similar to what my father is going through. I’ve suspected it all along, but those doctors didn’t want to hear my opinion.

  • I have no siblings, no other parent, I was fresh out of college and just started my career. I lost my job and have been 5 years unemployed because of the stress of caring for my parent with PD. Now the relative who is currently taking care of my parent is threatening to take my parent’s home, the one I’m trying to hold together for him, so they can put him in a nursing home. I just got a new job and am still on probation. There is no way I can afford to take care of my parent with or without my new job. I am more than 30 years under retirement age. I live in a suburb of San Francisco. What am I supposed to do? The house is under my parent’s name, and I don’t know any legal stuff. I can’t afford to pay for a lawyer. I don’t even go to the doctor to take care of my immediate medical needs. What can I do?! I don’t want to kill myself.

  • Thanks for sharing. I understand 100% I am a caregiver for my 100 year old mother. She is in late stage parkingson’s and dementia. It’s hard.

  • We need to start educating everyone on Parkinson’s and how it can affect the mind so once the onset of the disease begins they won’t be so much in denial of what they see. I find that people with a lot of previous drama in there life are the worst when PD kicks in.

  • Diane, my husband is going through much the same thing as your husband, even the part about two of me.
    You are right, there is not enough information about this aspect of Parkinson’s. Hopefully the new drugs that are being tested now will be approved and available in time for our husbands to use them.

  • May God bless you. We are going through this with my father who is suffering from Parkinson disease psychosis. Thank you for sharing your story and making us feel that we are not alone with this debilitating aspect of Parkinson. Take good care and stay strong.

  • Thank you for sharing Diane. My mother also suffers from Parkinsons and the psychosis as well. Please know that there are so many others who are dealing with the same situation and you and your husband. We too had no idea about this part of Parkinsons Disease. I pray for strength and guidance for you, your husband and everyone who suffers in any way from this horrible disease. Again, thank you for sharing your story.

  • Good to hear this because i felt like i was goin crazy…specially at work at night. It causes me great fear…only 45…so hopefully it doesn’t get much worse. I had this feeling of someone being there before meds & after still have it.

  • I’m going through so much my husband has Parkinson’s over 10 years how he developed Dementia now that’s a problem He see people in the house men having sex with my and we are the only one in the house..he’s very angry calls me names this is now day and nite ��Any advice for me??

  • Thank you for sharing your lives with us. I’m caring for my Mother and seen a slow and gradual decline in her over the past few years. In the past week she has been randomly making up rhymes. Sometimes lasting up to two hours. A form of Psychosis I am told. So sad and difficult to come to terms with.
    It’s getting me down and I’m trying to do my best. I gave up my job after we lost her second husband to care for her. She’s now bed bound and underweight. Even after years of medical treatment she still hasn’t recovered. I think time is running out. ��

  • Thank you for sharing this the lives of these two people BOTH ravaged by Parkinson’s. My husband has it too, yet I doubt I have the strength to cope anywhere near as well as Diane seems to. We’ve lost everything but each other to this awful disease.

  • My father suffers this disease along with Alzheimer’s and Dementia….. he believed someone actually came into his house… took a shower and left! He also thought a family member close to him was trying to kill him! He doesn’t take PD meds… he’ll be home with me on hospice because of dysphasia… it breaks my heart��♋️

  • I am 63 years old, I was diagnosed of Parkinsons disease at the age of 57. I had severe calf pain, muscle pain, slurred speech, frequent falls, loss of balance, difficulty getting up from sitting position. I was placed on Sinemet 3 times daily, it helped me but not very much. My neurologist advised me to try natural treatments and introduced me to NewLife Clinic Parkinsons Disease Herbal formula, I read alot of positive reviews from other patients who used the treatment and i immediately started on the treatment. I had great improvement and relief with this treatment, total decline of symptoms. Great improvement with speech, co-ordination, balance, muscle, mood etc, I gained back my life with this treatment and can never be thankful enough. Visit NewLife Clinic official website ww w. newlifeherbalclinic. com.

    My life is back!

  • Diane, thank you so much for sharing this. We are just starting to deal with the personality shifts and psychosis dimensions of Parkinson’s. We had no idea (most books about Parkinson’s don’t cover the subject) that the night disturbances and the halucinations had anything to do with my husband’s disease. We are just at the beginning (first 3 years) so knowing other’s honest stories helps so much. By the way, we are happy too. We vow every day to walk in joy as well as we can.

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