U.S. Teens Consuming Less Sodas

U.S. Teens Drinking Fewer Soft Drinks. Created: 12/14/2016.

Last Updated: 12/14/2016. Share on: THURSDAY, July 7, 2016 (HealthDay News)—American teens are turning their backs on soft drinks, says a new government survey that shows soda consumption among youth declined by almost a third in just two years. THURSDAY, July 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) American teens are turning their backs on soft drinks, says a new government survey that shows soda consumption among youth declined by almost a third in just two years.

Instead, bottled water has become the drink of choice for many, the researchers found. “Over the past 15 years, a great deal of research has demonstrated that sugar drinks. THURSDAY, July 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) American teens are turning their backs on soft drinks, says a new government survey that shows soda consumption among youth declined by almost a third in just two years. Instead, bottled water has become the drink.

Twenty-three percent of teens who drank fewer than one soft drink a week reported carrying a weapon, for example, compared to 43 percent who drank five or more cans a week. And violence towards. The study, of about 45,000 children and adults, looked at trends between 2004 and 2014, and found that children are consuming 19 percent fewer sugary drinks (defined as “soda, fruit drinks and punches, sports drinks, low-calorie drinks, and other sweetened beverages”) while adult consumption is down 11.5 percent. Struggling to cook healthy?

Soft drink makers target U.S. youth online: study Children were exposed to 22 percent fewer ads for sugary PepsiCo Inc drinks, it said. teens. Teens Who Consume Energy Drinks Are at Higher Risk for Drug Use stronger than those between regular or diet soft drinks and substance use. Research at the University of Michigan studied U.

Some parents confuse energy drinks with sports drinks and many teens mistakenly believe energy drinks are healthy alternatives to soda. Plus, energy drink companies create packaging and labels that appeal to a younger audience and frequently sponsor events (like snowboarding) that are likely to appeal to teens. Sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) or sugary drinks are leading sources of added sugars in the American diet. Frequently drinking sugar-sweetened beverages is associated with weight gain/obesity, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, kidney.

Soft drinks can be bad for your waistline, your teeth, your bones, and more. she often recommends they switch to a brand with fewer artificial ingredients. If you drink.

List of related literature:

In 1978, the typical teenage boy in the United States drank about seven ounces of soda every day; today he drinks nearly three times that amount, deriving 9 percent of his daily caloric intake from soft drinks.

“Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the All-American Meal” by Eric Schlosser
from Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the All-American Meal
by Eric Schlosser
Houghton Mifflin, 2001

The typical American teenage boy now gets about 9% of his daily caloric intake from soft drinks, and about 20% of oneand two-year-olds now regularly drink soda (Schlosser, 2001).

“Sociology: Exploring the Architecture of Everyday Life” by David M. Newman
from Sociology: Exploring the Architecture of Everyday Life
by David M. Newman
SAGE Publications, 2008

The typical American teenage boy gets about 9% of his daily caloric intake from soft drinks, and about 20% of oneand two-year-olds now regularly drink soda (Schlosser, 2001).

“Sociology: Exploring the Architecture of Everyday Life” by David M. Newman
from Sociology: Exploring the Architecture of Everyday Life
by David M. Newman
SAGE Publications, 2009

The typical American teenage boy gets about 9% of his daily caloric intake from soft drinks, and about 20% of oneand two-year-olds regularly drink soda (Schlosser, 2001).

“Sociology: Exploring the Architecture of Everyday Life” by David M. Newman
from Sociology: Exploring the Architecture of Everyday Life
by David M. Newman
SAGE Publications, 2011

Studies link the rising prevalence of obesity in children to consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks.50 On average, Americans drink 53 gallons of soda per year—40 percent more than two decades ago.

“Discovering Nutrition” by Paul M. Insel, R. Elaine Turner, Don Ross
from Discovering Nutrition
by Paul M. Insel, R. Elaine Turner, Don Ross
Jones and Bartlett Publishers, 2006

Drinking just one regular soft drink a day can add up to fifteen extra pounds of weight a year—and most American teens drink more than one soft drink a day.

“Prescription for Dietary Wellness: Using Foods to Heal” by Phyllis A. Balch CNC
from Prescription for Dietary Wellness: Using Foods to Heal
by Phyllis A. Balch CNC
Penguin Publishing Group, 2003

In many European countries binge drinking occurs in up to 60 percent of youth aged 15–16 years, about three times higher than in the USA.

“The New Public Health” by Theodore H. Tulchinsky, Elena A. Varavikova
from The New Public Health
by Theodore H. Tulchinsky, Elena A. Varavikova
Elsevier Science, 2014

Consumption of soft drinks by kids has almost doubled in the past ten years, according to the study’s author, Dr. David Ludwig Estimates now suggest that more than half of the average American child’s daily calories come from sodas, juices, and other high-calorie drinks.

“Born to Buy: The Commercialized Child and the New Consumer Culture” by Juliet Schor, Associate Professor of Economics Juliet B Schor, Charles Scribner's Sons
from Born to Buy: The Commercialized Child and the New Consumer Culture
by Juliet Schor, Associate Professor of Economics Juliet B Schor, Charles Scribner’s Sons
Scribner, 2004

One analysis suggests that one-fourth of adolescents drink 26 or more ounces of soft drinks per day (a minimum of 3 25 calories); these heavy users take in 600 daily calories more from all sources than nonusers, and they drink much less milk and fruit juice.6

“Food Politics: How the Food Industry Influences Nutrition and Health” by Marion Nestle
from Food Politics: How the Food Industry Influences Nutrition and Health
by Marion Nestle
University of California Press, 2013

The findings indicate that teens are much more likely to drink when their parents do not monitor what their child is exposed to through movies, television, music, and the Internet.

“Understanding the High-functioning Alcoholic: Professional Views and Personal Insights” by Sarah Allen Benton
from Understanding the High-functioning Alcoholic: Professional Views and Personal Insights
by Sarah Allen Benton
Praeger, 2009

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
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