Three-Drug Inhaler Might Be funding for Bronchial asthma Patients

 

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Video taken from the channel: breatherville


 

Metered dose inhaler errors common among adult COPD, asthma patients

Video taken from the channel: MDedge: news and insights for busy physicians


 

Medicines Changes COPD and Asthma

Video taken from the channel: NHS Fife


 

Possible Ban On Asthma Drugs

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WEBINAR – Difficult-to-treat and severe asthma: changing the paradigm

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Asthma & COPD Treatment / Pharmacology (Inhaler Progression)

Video taken from the channel: MedCram Medical Lectures Explained CLEARLY


 

Inhalers (Asthma Treatment & COPD Treatment) Explained!

Video taken from the channel: MedCram Medical Lectures Explained CLEARLY


Three-Drug Inhaler May Be an Advance for Asthma Patients. TUESDAY, Oct. 1, 2019 A new 3-in-1 asthma drug inhaler may provide better and easier control of symptoms for tough-to-treat patients, two new studies suggest. The two phase 3 trials involved more than 2,500 asthma patients across 17 countries. Patients tested out an inhaler that contained three drugs: A steroid preventer to.

TUESDAY, Oct. 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) A new 3-in-1 asthma drug inhaler may provide better and easier control of symptoms for tough-to-treat. TUESDAY, Oct.

1, 2019 (HealthDay News) A new 3-in-1 asthma drug inhaler may provide better and easier control of symptoms for tough-to-treat patients, two new studies suggest. The two phase 3 trials involved more than 2,500 asthma patients across 17 countries. Patients tested out an inhaler that contained three drugs: A steroid preventer to control inflammation; a long-acting bronchodilator to.

In both trials, lung function as measured by a standard breathing test improved for patients using the triple-drug inhaler versus those using a two-drug inhaler, the investigators found. The combo inhaler also showed some effectiveness in preventing asthma attacks. A new 3-in-1 asthma drug inhaler may provide better and easier control of symptoms for tough-to-treat patients. TUESDAY, Oct.

1, 2019 (HealthDay News) A new 3-in-1 asthma drug inhaler may provide better and easier control of symptoms for tough-to-treat patients, two new studies suggest. The two phase 3 trials involved more than 2,500 asthma patients across 17 countries. Three-Drug Inhaler May Be an Advance for Asthma Patients TUESDAY, Oct. 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) A new 3-in-1 asthma drug inhaler may provide better and easier control of symptoms for tough-to-treat patients, two new studies suggest. Three-Drug Inhaler May Be an Advance for Asthma Patients.

A new 3-in-1 asthma drug inhaler may provide better and easier control of symptoms for tough-to-treat patients, two new studies suggest. The two phase 3 trials involved more than 2,500 asthma patients across 17 countries. Three-Drug Inhaler May Be an Advance for Asthma Patients. TUESDAY, Oct. 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) A new 3-in-1 asthma drug inhaler may provide better and easier control of symptoms for tough-to-treat patients, two new studies suggest.

The two phase 3 trials involved more than 2,500 asthma patients across 17 countries. TUESDAY, Oct. 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) A new 3-in-1 asthma drug inhaler may provide better and easier control of symptoms for tough-to-treat patients, two new studies suggest.

The two phase 3 trials involved more than 2,500 asthma patients across 17 countries.

List of related literature:

It is not surprising, therefore, that this antibody successfully completed clinical trials and was subsequently approved by the FDA for use in those adults and adolescents with moderate or severe persistent atopic asthma whose symptoms are inadequately controlled with inhaled corticosteroids.

“Roitt's Essential Immunology” by Peter J. Delves, Seamus J. Martin, Dennis R. Burton, Ivan M. Roitt
from Roitt’s Essential Immunology
by Peter J. Delves, Seamus J. Martin, et. al.
Wiley, 2017

Montelukast improves asthma control in asthmatic children maintained on inhaled corticosteroids.

“Pediatric Allergy: Principles and Practice E-Book” by Donald Y. M. Leung, Hugh Sampson, Raif Geha, Stanley J. Szefler
from Pediatric Allergy: Principles and Practice E-Book
by Donald Y. M. Leung, Hugh Sampson, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

It is not surprising therefore that this antibody successfully completed phase II clinical trials and was subsequently approved by the FDA for use in those adults and adolescents with moderate or severe persistent atopic asthma whose symptoms are inadequately controlled with inhaled corticosteroids.

“Roitt's Essential Immunology” by Peter J. Delves, Seamus J. Martin, Dennis R. Burton, Ivan M. Roitt
from Roitt’s Essential Immunology
by Peter J. Delves, Seamus J. Martin, et. al.
Wiley, 2011

Similarly, new inhaler regimens of once-daily LABA (and potentially LAMA) drugs plus an inhaled corticosteroid are being developed as successors to the single inhaler combinations noted previously.

“Clinical Respiratory Medicine E-Book: Expert Consult Online and Print” by Stephen G. Spiro, Gerard A Silvestri, Alvar Agustí
from Clinical Respiratory Medicine E-Book: Expert Consult Online and Print
by Stephen G. Spiro, Gerard A Silvestri, Alvar Agustí
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

Asthma occurs in 8% to 10% of the U.S. population, and 10% of this group have severe asthma defined as requiring high-dose inhaled or systemic steroids (≥880 µg of inhaled fluticasone propionate or equivalent) in combination with a second long-term inhaled therapy.

“Pharmacology and Physiology for Anesthesia E-Book: Foundations and Clinical Application” by Hugh C. Hemmings, Talmage D. Egan
from Pharmacology and Physiology for Anesthesia E-Book: Foundations and Clinical Application
by Hugh C. Hemmings, Talmage D. Egan
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

A controlled trial of inhaled corticosteroids in patients receiving prednisolone tablets for asthma.

“Crofton and Douglas's Respiratory Diseases” by Anthony Seaton, A. Gordon Leitch, Douglas Seaton
from Crofton and Douglas’s Respiratory Diseases
by Anthony Seaton, A. Gordon Leitch, Douglas Seaton
Wiley, 2008

Leukotriene receptor antagonists in addition to usual care for acute asthma in adults and children.

“Critical Care Medicine E-Book: Principles of Diagnosis and Management in the Adult” by Joseph E. Parrillo, R. Phillip Dellinger
from Critical Care Medicine E-Book: Principles of Diagnosis and Management in the Adult
by Joseph E. Parrillo, R. Phillip Dellinger
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

Long-term inhaled corticosteroids in preschool children at high risk for asthma.

“Asthma and COPD: Basic Mechanisms and Clinical Management” by Peter J. Barnes, Jeffrey M. Drazen, Stephen I. Rennard, Neil C. Thomson
from Asthma and COPD: Basic Mechanisms and Clinical Management
by Peter J. Barnes, Jeffrey M. Drazen, et. al.
Elsevier Science, 2009

Randomized trial of the addition of ipratropium bromide to albuterol and corticosteroid therapy in children hospitalized because of an acute asthma exacerbation.

“Neonatal and Pediatric Respiratory Care E-Book” by Brian K. Walsh
from Neonatal and Pediatric Respiratory Care E-Book
by Brian K. Walsh
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

Therefore, nearly all children with acute asthma should receive systemic corticosteroids, preferably at the start of their ED treatment.

“Pediatric Emergency Medicine Secrets E-Book” by Steven M. Selbst, Kate Cronan
from Pediatric Emergency Medicine Secrets E-Book
by Steven M. Selbst, Kate Cronan
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2008

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • I’m Ian Venamore I was diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in my mid-fifties. Today I’m an active volunteer member of Lung Foundation Australia and chair of the associated COPD Patient Advocacy Group (CPAG).I also participates in international meetings with the goal to change the future of COPD recognition, diagnosis and treatment.I am a strong advocate for pulmonary rehabilitation and attends to gym classes “religiously.” I am also a firm believer in and proponent of patient education and self management. I obtain this cure from an Africa home of herbal roots for traditional treatment and they are 100% active and effective, which make it very difficult for science to discover or believe this traditionally cure, try your luck if you are CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE Patient, their contact is as follow. [email protected]  their Website: http://www.healthmedlabclinic.com recommended by Ian Venamore their satisfied previous COPD cured patient a living witness.

  • So I have a question. I’m in nursing school and we have been told that LABAs should be given first to increase the surface area of the lumen so that the subsequent medications have more surface area on which to react. In fact, they’ve been saying it’s crucial they come first. What are your thoughts on that? And this is specifically in context to Asthma.

  • Your video sir just saved my grade and me from reading 20 plus pages. I’ve aways struggled understanding these meds and u have made everything so clear and simple… thank you!!!

  • I have really bad acute COPD, diagnosed since 2 years back many attacks led me to take ambulances to the A&E, 5/6/7 times, 4/5 days in there on drip amoxyciline, levofloxycina, later Prednisona uuurrrg at home, that was the only thing that would relieve the extreme exacerbations after an hour of almost dying,,. I tried everything medicinal, believe me. BUT, the ONE thing that has changed my life, really, is inhaling dry himalayan salt. It is a Godsend. 3 bucks a kilo, which will last me a years, please, if you have COPD, just do it. My mucus cleared up in a matter of days, now after a couple of months, along with heavy dosage daily of Vitamin D3 2000 i/u /day, plus Zinc daily, and a small Vit. B supplement to help absorb the D3 into the blood and not over create calcium in the blood, still use a Ventolin(Salbutemol) spray, but much much less, i used to use one a day!!! now one a week…I feel like I am being cured, it’s AMAAAAAAZING!!!Trust me,it’s natural, it’s real!!!

  • …So what do you do re: treatment if you have BOTH asthma and COPD. I’ve had asthma for 30+years, well-controlled most of the time; was diagnosed with COPD two months ago. Am currently finding I’m using my rescue inhaler A LOT, and the additional inhaler isn’t working. Lots of shortness of breath. I have other immune issues that would do better if I got off any steroids. Can’t do that? Anybody else have asthma and COPD together?

  • I have talked to Physicians, Resp techs, nurses and I get all kinds of conflicting answers for inhalers for my condition. What is the right inhaler for Pulmonary Fibrosis??

  • 0:12 Zinc Deficiency? (smooth muscle) B1, B12 deficiency? low/underproduction of HCI stomach acid = Leads to Asthma/GERD trigger.