This Might increase the Chance of Getting a Stillbirth

 

Reducing the risks of stillbirth

Video taken from the channel: Scottish Government


 

Increased risk of stillbirth if, when pregnant, you don’t sleep on your side

Video taken from the channel: Uni of Huddersfield News & Research


 

Pregnant mums told to sleep on their side to prevent stillbirth

Video taken from the channel: 5 News


 

What a Stillbirth Might Mean for Future Pregnancies

Video taken from the channel: dailyRx


 

Finding the reasons for stillbirth Tommy’s research

Video taken from the channel: Tommy’s


 

Ending preventable stillbirths (extended version)

Video taken from the channel: LSHTM


 

Pregnancy procedure may increase risk of preterm birth and still birth

Video taken from the channel: Imperial College London


The placenta provides the baby with oxygen and essential nutrients, so anything that interferes puts the baby at risk. Placenta problems may be. This Could Raise the Risk of Having a Stillbirth HealthyWomen Editors. 25 Jun 2015 Pregnancy & Postpartum. WEDNESDAY, June 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) Women who’ve had one stillbirth have a four times higher risk of having another stillbirth compared to women who’ve had a live birth, British researchers report.

Another risk factor is not smoking during the three months before pregnancy occurs, they found. Stillbirth, defined as fetal death at 20 weeks into the pregnancy or later, affects one in 160 U.S. This Could Raise the Risk of Having a Stillbirth. Created: 06/25/2015. Last Updated: 06/26/2015.

Share on: WEDNESDAY, June 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) Women who’ve had one stillbirth have a four times higher risk of having another stillbirth compared to women who’ve had a. There are a number of things that may increase your risk of having a stillborn baby, including: Having twins or a multiple pregnancy Having a baby who doesn’t reach his or her growth potential in the womb Being over 35 years of age. Most stillbirths are caused by placental or genetic problems; infections or umbilical cord issues can also result in stillbirths..

Women can take steps to reduce risk, such as avoiding smoking and. Chromosomal abnormalities are known to cause the majority of miscarriages, but certain chromosomal problems and birth defects can also increase the risk of stillbirth. Chromosomal abnormalities, especially those associated with anatomic abnormalities or birth defects, account for a high percentage of stillbirths.

Research has suggested a 4 ug/m3 increase in exposure to small particulate matter of less than 2.5 in diameter (PM2.5) is associated with a 2 per cent increased risk of stillbirth, along with. If a baby is smaller than expected or their growth pattern tails off as the pregnancy continues, it may be because the placenta isn’t working properly. This increases the risk of stillbirth. Problems with a baby’s growth should be picked up during antenatal appointments.

The risk of having a miscarriage is about 20 percent when you are 35 years old, the risk increases to 40 percent at age 40 and to 80 percent when you are 45 years old. Excessive weight Being overweight or obese may increase your risk of having a miscarriage.

List of related literature:

In addition to exacerbations, other maternal risks include an increased rate of miscarriage, nephritis, preeclampsia, possible need to give birth at a preterm gestation, and an increased risk of cesarean birth.

“Maternity and Women's Health Care E-Book” by Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Shannon E. Perry, Mary Catherine Cashion, Kathryn Rhodes Alden
from Maternity and Women’s Health Care E-Book
by Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Shannon E. Perry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2014

Increased levels of AFP and hCG in women with normal fetuses have been associated with an increased risk of stillbirth, abruption, preterm labor, pregnancy-induced hypertension, miscarriage, and low birth weight.

“Maternal, Fetal, & Neonatal Physiology: A Clinical Perspective” by Susan Tucker Blackburn
from Maternal, Fetal, & Neonatal Physiology: A Clinical Perspective
by Susan Tucker Blackburn
Saunders Elsevier, 2007

The risk of stillbirth is very low, and increases slightly as your pregnancy goes further post-dates.

“The Positive Birth Book: A new approach to pregnancy, birth and the early weeks” by Milli Hill
from The Positive Birth Book: A new approach to pregnancy, birth and the early weeks
by Milli Hill
Pinter & Martin Ltd, 2017

There are a few medical diseases which are known to increase the risk for stillbirth like pre-existing hypertension or pre-existing diabetes, but also a previous abruption increases the risk for a stillbirth (Box 26.1).

“Handbook of Forensic Medicine” by Burkhard Madea
from Handbook of Forensic Medicine
by Burkhard Madea
Wiley, 2014

However, women who had a stillbirth in a previous pregnancy have a 6-fold to 10-fold increased risk for stillbirth in a subsequent pregnancy.

“Creasy and Resnik's Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Principles and Practice E-Book” by Robert Resnik, Robert K. Creasy, Jay D. Iams, Charles J. Lockwood, Thomas Moore, Michael F Greene, Lesley Frazier
from Creasy and Resnik’s Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Principles and Practice E-Book
by Robert Resnik, Robert K. Creasy, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2008

Genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis can eliminate the increased risk of stillbirth for women who are found not to have preexisting medical conditions, since for older mothers whose blood pressure and weight are normal, there does not appear to be any excess risk of stillbirth.

“The New Harvard Guide to Women's Health” by Karen J. Carlson, Stephanie A. Eisenstat, Stephanie A. Eisenstat, M.D., Terra Diane Ziporyn, Alvin & Nancy Baird Library Fund, Harvard University. Press
from The New Harvard Guide to Women’s Health
by Karen J. Carlson, Stephanie A. Eisenstat, et. al.
Harvard University Press, 2004

In addition to exacerbations, other maternal risks include an increased rate of miscarriage, a possible need to give birth at a preterm gestation, and preeclampsia.

“Maternal Child Nursing Care E-Book” by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, Kathryn Rhodes Alden, Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Mary Catherine Cashion, David Wilson
from Maternal Child Nursing Care E-Book
by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

Furthermore, placenta previa increases the risk of preterm labour, and the possibility that the baby will be delivered prematurely

“Midwifery and Obstetrical Nursing” by Sharma
from Midwifery and Obstetrical Nursing
by Sharma
Gen Next Publications, 2009

Stillbirth risk in a second pregnancy.

“Creasy and Resnik's Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Principles and Practice E-Book” by Robert Resnik, Charles J. Lockwood, Thomas Moore, Michael F Greene, Joshua Copel, Robert M Silver
from Creasy and Resnik’s Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Principles and Practice E-Book
by Robert Resnik, Charles J. Lockwood, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

In women with one previous caesarean delivery, the risk of unexplained antepartum stillbirth at or after 39 weeks gestation is about double the risk of stillbirth or neonatal death from intrapartum uterine rupture.

“Midwifery: Preparation for Practice” by Sally Pairman, Sally K. Tracy, Carol Thorogood, Jan Pincombe
from Midwifery: Preparation for Practice
by Sally Pairman, Sally K. Tracy, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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