This May Be Why Your Son Or Daughter is Battling in class

 

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When your child all of the sudden doesn’t want to tell you about what they are learning in school, or how their school day went, it can be a signal that something is not right at school. This could also be limited to the subjects they are struggling with. Major Change in Attitude About School. Ask yourself: Does he struggle to see the blackboard?

He could need glasses. Is he anxious about going to school? Maybe there’s an emotional issue. It is hard for him to sit still and focus? He could have a problem paying attention.

Talk to your son and his teacher to see what may be getting in the way of learning. It’s easy to assume that a child who is struggling in school isn’t capable of doing the work. However, it is sometimes the exact opposite. According to Noodle, a child who does not feel challenged in school will grow bored and may not complete tasks they find uninteresting. There are many reasons why your child may be struggling in school.

It’s possible that the child might be experiencing a learning issue, dealing with poor vision, or they may have trouble relating to the content. Whatever the case, it is important to find ways to help the child learn. Learning Distractions. The circumstances in your child’s life can be as much a block to learning as any clinical disability.

A child faced with divorcing parents, a school bully, or even the loss of a pet can begin to fall behind in school. Play an active role in your child’s. Relationship problems outside of school can also carry over to the classroom.

Parents can be a source of support or stress. While family problems may add to a child’s struggle in the classroo. In the face of academic challenges, it’s perfectly normal for children to go through emotional challenges as well.

In a heated moment, here. Learning problems: Academic struggles can be stressful for both children and families. Sometimes children are struggling in school because of an undiagnosed learning disability. Psychologists can conduct neuropsychological testing to assess learning problems and identify strategies to help meet academic demands at school.

Besides their difficulties in school they are also dealing with the emotions of dragging their parents down. This causes children to feel even more discouraged and further compromises their academic career. Many times parents will say to their child, “If you just try harder, you can do better.”. Peers can have a big impact on school success, especially in Grade 9, when your child will be meeting lots of new people, so ask questions about his friends, and have his crowd over so you can meet them.

On how to instill self-discipline Help create the proper conditions.

List of related literature:

With this additional information, the teacher and psychologist together may determine that the child is also experiencing a lot of anxiety at school, which may be impacting early literacy skill development.

“Comprehensive Handbook of Psychological Assessment, Volume 3: Behavioral Assessment” by Stephen N. Haynes, Elaine M. Heiby, Michel Hersen
from Comprehensive Handbook of Psychological Assessment, Volume 3: Behavioral Assessment
by Stephen N. Haynes, Elaine M. Heiby, Michel Hersen
Wiley, 2003

For a few, it may be the case that all concerned agree that a particular child finds school so stressful, and his behaviour is so demanding, that he is best suited to a personalised package of learning and support.

“Understanding Pathological Demand Avoidance Syndrome in Children: A Guide for Parents, Teachers and Other Professionals” by Margaret Duncan, Zara Healy, Ruth Fidler, Phil Christie
from Understanding Pathological Demand Avoidance Syndrome in Children: A Guide for Parents, Teachers and Other Professionals
by Margaret Duncan, Zara Healy, et. al.
Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2011

Parents need to determine whether the child is performing less well than expected because of anxiety (the child may be wondering why he is different, causing his attention to wander from schoolwork) or because the child might truly be unable to master higher academic concepts due to a learning block or disability.

“Cerebral Palsy: A Complete Guide for Caregiving” by Freeman Miller, Steven J. Bachrach
from Cerebral Palsy: A Complete Guide for Caregiving
by Freeman Miller, Steven J. Bachrach
Johns Hopkins University Press, 2017

If evidence from parent and teacher reports indicate that the youngster may suffer from some specific learning weakness (beyond the general academic underachievement common to all children with ADHD), a comprehensive psychoeducational evaluation may be warranted.

“Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Third Edition: A Handbook for Diagnosis and Treatment” by Russell A. Barkley
from Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Third Edition: A Handbook for Diagnosis and Treatment
by Russell A. Barkley
Guilford Publications, 2005

The child may have psychosomatic problems, such as recurrent abdominal pain or headaches, and may have frequent absences from school.

“Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics E-Book” by William B. Carey, Allen C. Crocker, Ellen Roy Elias, Heidi M. Feldman, William L. Coleman
from Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics E-Book
by William B. Carey, Allen C. Crocker, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2009

Although the learning-disabled child may have a long history of consistently poor school performance, the higher functioning child may not be detected untillater in elementary school, such as in the fourth or fifth grade.

“Family Medicine: Principles and Practice” by A.K. David, S.A. Fields, D.M. Phillips, J.E. Scherger, Robert Taylor
from Family Medicine: Principles and Practice
by A.K. David, S.A. Fields, et. al.
Springer New York, 2002

Most schools are willing to work with families in maintaining their childГs education by providing homework assignments, communicating with hospital-based teachers, helping parents become informal tutors, and arranging for tutorial services to begin as soon as the child is eligible.

“Primary Care of the Child With a Chronic Condition E-Book” by Patricia Jackson Allen, Judith A. Vessey, Naomi Schapiro
from Primary Care of the Child With a Chronic Condition E-Book
by Patricia Jackson Allen, Judith A. Vessey, Naomi Schapiro
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2009

Fourth, both parents and the first-grade teachers are less likely to say that the child doesn’t “know” phonics and more likely to understand that the child is having great difficulty saying what she does know.

“Lenses on Reading, Third Edition: An Introduction to Theories and Models” by Diane H. Tracey, Lesley Mandel Morrow
from Lenses on Reading, Third Edition: An Introduction to Theories and Models
by Diane H. Tracey, Lesley Mandel Morrow
Guilford Publications, 2017

At the beginning of the school year, their son Dylan was diagnosed with a learning disability in reading comprehension, thus requiring a lot more school meetings and evaluation appointments and work on the Individualized Education Plan (IEP).

“Handbook of Military Social Work” by Allen Rubin, Eugenia L. Weiss, Jose E. Coll
from Handbook of Military Social Work
by Allen Rubin, Eugenia L. Weiss, Jose E. Coll
Wiley, 2012

This means that your child has a great deal of potential for succeeding in school, though teachers in traditional school settings may tend to view ADHD as a disadvantage.

“The Gift of ADHD: How to Transform Your Child's Problems into Strengths” by Lara Honos-Webb, Scott Shannon
from The Gift of ADHD: How to Transform Your Child’s Problems into Strengths
by Lara Honos-Webb, Scott Shannon
New Harbinger Publications, 2010

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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