This Contraception Method May Increase Aids Risk

 

Chapter 28Birth Control

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Webinar: An Update on Hormonal Contraception and HIV

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Hormonal Contraception and HIV Risk: Understanding the ECHO Trial

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Contraceptive Options Are Critical for Women With HIV

Video taken from the channel: Population Reference Bureau


 

Popular birth control methods do not increase your HIV risk: Trial

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Hormonal Contraception May Double HIV/AIDS Risk

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[91VOA]Does a Birth Control Method Raise HiV Risk

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Washington, Jan 9: Scientists have claimed that a using a certain type of injectable birth control could fairly increase the risk of becoming infected with HIV. A large meta-analysis of 12 studies. The world has spent nearly a quarter of a century wondering whether Africa’s most widely used birth control method could make women more likely to contract HIV. increase a woman’s risk of HIV. One possibility may be that birth control with higher levels of progestin, the synthetic form of the natural hormone progesterone, changed the vaginal lining or altered local immunity, increasing the risk for HIV infection, though the researchers emphasized that this study did not examine the physiological effects of the different contraceptive methods and more research on potential underlying biologic mechanisms. You can use any method of birth control, including combined hormonal methods like the pill, the patch, the ring, or more effective methods like the shot, the implant, or the IUD.

Just keep in mind that none of these methods prevent the transmission of HIV or other sexually transmitted infections (STIs), so it’s important to use condoms too. Combined oral contraceptives may increase the risk of STD/HIV infection (Center for Population Research, 1991). The increased risk of STD/HIV infection may be caused by the cervical ectropion induced by oral contraceptives. Cervical ectropion extends the columnar epithelium from the cervical canal to the outer portion of the cervix. Contraceptive Method and Condom Use Among Womenat Risk for HIV Infection and Other Sexually Transmitted Diseases Selected U.S.

Sites, 1993-1994. A primary strategy for decreasing the spread of human immunodeficiencyvirus (HIV) and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) is to increasethe rate of condom use among at-risk persons, and an important approach forreducing unintended. Part of this future research programme includes the recognition that the different hormonal contraceptives may have differential impact on this potential risk, with the most concerning evidence of increased risk of acquisition of HIV notable primarily for women who use DMPA.7For example, the risk of elevated HIV transmission from the use of combined hormonal contraceptives, progestogen-releasing intrauterine devices (IUDs) or contraceptive implants may be lower in comparison to DMPA.

21 rows · Dec 31, 2018 · It can, depending on your health and the type of birth control you use. Talk to. Only birth control methods with hormones may raise your chance of blood clots.

Barrier methods such as condoms and diaphragms do not. Neither do medical sterilization procedures, like getting your. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that all women get tested for HIV before they become pregnant or as early as possible during each pregnancy.

The earlier HIV is detected, the sooner HIV medicines can be started. Pregnant women with HIV take HIV medicines to reduce the risk of mother-to-child transmission of HIV.

List of related literature:

Update to CDC’s U.S. Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use, 2010: revised recommendations for the use of hormonal contraception among women at high risk for HIV infection or infected with HIV.

“Williams Textbook of Endocrinology” by Shlomo Melmed, MBChB, MACP, Kenneth S. Polonsky, MD, P. Reed Larsen, MD, FRCP, Henry M. Kronenberg, MD
from Williams Textbook of Endocrinology
by Shlomo Melmed, MBChB, MACP, Kenneth S. Polonsky, MD, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

Update to the CDC’s US medical eligibilitycriteriafor contraceptive use, 2010: revised recomendations fortheuseofhormonalcontraception among women at high risk for HIV infection or infected with HIV.

“Varney's Midwifery” by Tekoa L. King, Mary C. Brucker, Jan M. Kriebs, Jenifer O. Fahey
from Varney’s Midwifery
by Tekoa L. King, Mary C. Brucker, et. al.
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2013

The efficacy of female condom skills training in HIV risk reduction among women: a randomized controlled trial.

“Sexually Transmitted Infections E-book” by Bhushan Kumar, Somesh Gupta
from Sexually Transmitted Infections E-book
by Bhushan Kumar, Somesh Gupta
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2014

Study halted: No benefit seen from antiretroviral pill in preventing HIV in women.

“Our Sexuality” by Robert L. Crooks, Karla Baur
from Our Sexuality
by Robert L. Crooks, Karla Baur
Cengage Learning, 2013

Third, HIV may increase condom use at the expense of more effective contraceptives, such as the pill, thereby increasing exposure to conception.

“The Concise Encyclopedia of Sociology” by George Ritzer, J. Michael Ryan
from The Concise Encyclopedia of Sociology
by George Ritzer, J. Michael Ryan
Wiley, 2010

Update to CDC’s U.S. Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use, 2016: revised recommendations for the use of hormonal contraception among women at high risk for HIV infection.

“Varney's Midwifery” by Tekoa L. King, Mary C. Brucker, Kathryn Osborne, Cecilia M. Jevitt
from Varney’s Midwifery
by Tekoa L. King, Mary C. Brucker, et. al.
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2018

HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C and infertility: reducing risk.

“Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases” by John E. Bennett, Raphael Dolin, Martin J. Blaser, Gerald L. Mandell
from Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett’s Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases
by John E. Bennett, Raphael Dolin, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2009

b Progestin-only contraceptives cause vaginal thinning, which may increase risk of HIV and may increase viral shedding if the woman has HIV (Hatcher et al.,

“Women's Health Care in Advanced Practice Nursing, Second Edition” by Ivy M. Alexander, PhD, APRN, ANP-BC, FAANP, FAAN, Versie Johnson-Mallard, PhD, ARNP, WHNP-BC, FAANP, Elizabeth Kostas-Polston, PhD, APRN, WHNP-BC, FAANP, Catherine Ingram Fogel, PhD, RNC, FAAN, Nancy Fugate Woods, PhD, RN, FAAN
from Women’s Health Care in Advanced Practice Nursing, Second Edition
by Ivy M. Alexander, PhD, APRN, ANP-BC, FAANP, FAAN, Versie Johnson-Mallard, PhD, ARNP, WHNP-BC, FAANP, et. al.
Springer Publishing Company, 2017

Hormonal contraceptive use and risk of HIV-1 disease progression.

“Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases E-Book” by John E. Bennett, Raphael Dolin, Martin J. Blaser
from Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett’s Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases E-Book
by John E. Bennett, Raphael Dolin, Martin J. Blaser
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2014

For example, even though only 13% of married African women use effective barrier methods of contraception, it has been estimated that, in 2002, those birth control methods prevented 173,000 cases of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in subSaharan Africa.

“Hacker & Moore's Essentials of Obstetrics and Gynecology E-Book” by Neville F. Hacker, Joseph C. Gambone, Calvin J. Hobel
from Hacker & Moore’s Essentials of Obstetrics and Gynecology E-Book
by Neville F. Hacker, Joseph C. Gambone, Calvin J. Hobel
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2009

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • Just FYI, this trial was not conclusive and the claims made are misleading. They didn’t test all popular hormonal contraceptives. Also, hormonal contraceptives like MPA have subsequently been shown to increase inflammation and epithelial lining permeability by off-target effects via the glucocorticoid receptor. This may increase HIV risk in women using this method. NET is a much safer option. For more info, check out this paper: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29698514