Things To Ask In A Parent-Teacher Conference

 

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Parent Teacher Conference Questions

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You must also come up with a definitive way in which communication will remain ongoing. Asking about how to follow up or the best ways to stay in contact (e.g., email, phone call, note home, etc.) should be discussed before time runs out on any parent-teacher conference. Questions to Ask During Parent Teacher Conferences: 1. How do you best prefer to communicate with me? (Email?

Phone? Text? Notes?) 2. What do you see as my child’s strengths? 3. What do you think are the academic challenges for my child?

4. What would you do if my child were struggling academically with something? 5. How is my child doing socially? 6. “Parents should ask parent-teacher conference questions about their child specifically, not about how he compares to the rest of the class,” advises Morin. “Your goal is to know about your child’s progress, to make sure he’s learning and has all the support he needs to do so.” Some questions that Morin recommends parents ask includ. “If a parent has potential concerns about bullying, for example, be sure to ask the teacher, How is my child interacting with their peers? Do you see any problems I should be aware of? ” she says.

5 Smart Questions to Ask During Parent Teacher Conference. Integrated Learning Strategies (ILS) is a learning and academic center. As a reminder, ILS is not a health care provider and none of our materials or services provide a diagnosis or treatment of a specific condition or learning challenge you may see in your child or student. Parent-teacher conferences are the kid version of your performance review.

Most employers these days require their staff to fill out a self-evaluation, and you should do the same with your child. 25 Questions You Should Ask Your Child’s Teacher at Parent’s Teacher Conference Interacting with your child’s teacher a couple of times in a semester is always suggested. This will aid in identifying and analysing your child’s strengths and weaknesses, talk about issues at hand, and review your child’s overall growth. Your main goal during a parent teacher conference is to make sure your teacher understands that you are in a partnership with them and want to do everything at home to support your child’s needs. Above all else, treat them as a professional! Be respectful!

2. Be Specific. We have our very first parent-teacher conference next week. He’s only in kindergarten, so I know this isn’t a college admission interview, but I want to know what sorts of questions I should.

Take advantage of parent-teacher conferences during the school year. Think of some questions and concerns you may have and write them down before your meeting. Keep track of your child’s schoolwork to help you with your questions.

You are in a position to share important information, as well as ask questions.

List of related literature:

To prepare students for the conference, teachers instruct students on how to lead the conference, assist them with collecting and preparing information to be shared with parents, and describe how to explain and interpret any information to be shared.

“Keeping Students Safe and Helping Them Thrive: A Collaborative Handbook on School Safety, Mental Health, and Wellness [2 volumes]” by David Osher Ph.D., Matthew J. Mayer, Robert J. Jagers, Kimberly Kendziora, Lacy Wood
from Keeping Students Safe and Helping Them Thrive: A Collaborative Handbook on School Safety, Mental Health, and Wellness [2 volumes]
by David Osher Ph.D., Matthew J. Mayer, et. al.
ABC-CLIO, 2019

Questions commonly asked by the students centered around specific aspects of a lesson plan, the reaction of the children to the lesson, and what the teacher planned to do in a follow-up lesson.

“Instructional Design: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools and Applications: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools and Applications” by Management Association, Information Resources
from Instructional Design: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools and Applications: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools and Applications
by Management Association, Information Resources
Information Science Reference, 2011

In parent-teacher conferences, for example, parents need a deep understanding of school practices to know what questions to ask and also the confidence to interrupt the teacher and to doggedly follow up if the teacher does not fully respond to their requests (Horvat, Weininger, and Lareau 2003).

“Facing Social Class: How Societal Rank Influences Interaction” by Susan T. Fiske, Hazel Rose Markus
from Facing Social Class: How Societal Rank Influences Interaction
by Susan T. Fiske, Hazel Rose Markus
Russell Sage Foundation, 2012

As part of our informal interviews and discussion sessions with parents, we also asked “What do you most want to know about your child’s teacher?” and “What teacher characteristics are most important to you?”

“Developing Grading and Reporting Systems for Student Learning” by Thomas R. Guskey, Jane M. Bailey
from Developing Grading and Reporting Systems for Student Learning
by Thomas R. Guskey, Jane M. Bailey
SAGE Publications, 2001

discuss how knowledge about children’s ideas can be used to critique curricular representations and materials, and then how the resulting changes in the design of activities and materials can play syntactical roles in classroom lessons as well.

“Examining Pedagogical Content Knowledge: The Construct and its Implications for Science Education” by Julie Gess-Newsome, Norman G. Lederman
from Examining Pedagogical Content Knowledge: The Construct and its Implications for Science Education
by Julie Gess-Newsome, Norman G. Lederman
Springer Netherlands, 2006

Depending on the nature of the presenting problem, children, for example, can be asked about their school, what they like to do after school, their special interests (e.g., favorite teams, music groups).

“Social Work Practice with Families: A Resiliency-Based Approach” by Mary Patricia Van Hook
from Social Work Practice with Families: A Resiliency-Based Approach
by Mary Patricia Van Hook
Oxford University Press, 2019

During parent-teacher conferences, ask about parents’ concerns.

“Learning and Leading with Habits of Mind: 16 Essential Characteristics for Success” by Arthur L. Costa, Bena Kallick
from Learning and Leading with Habits of Mind: 16 Essential Characteristics for Success
by Arthur L. Costa, Bena Kallick
Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 2008

Are there individual parent-teacher conferences on a regular basis?

“The Educated Child: A Parents Guide From Preschool Through Eighth Grade” by Chester E. Finn, Jr., John T. E. Cribb, Jr., William J. Bennett
from The Educated Child: A Parents Guide From Preschool Through Eighth Grade
by Chester E. Finn, Jr., John T. E. Cribb, Jr., William J. Bennett
Free Press, 1999

Have teachers asked me about my child and discussed the insights I have about his or her interests and activities, experiences, relationships,and feelings about school,and in areas outside of the school day?

“A Parent's Guide to Gifted Children” by James T. Webb, Janet L. Gore, Edward R. Amend
from A Parent’s Guide to Gifted Children
by James T. Webb, Janet L. Gore, Edward R. Amend
Great Potential Press, 2007

Teachers’ expectations of students can shape the nature of the tasks the teachers pose, what they ask, how long they wait, how and how much encouragement they provide— elements that together compose students’ opportunities to learn as well as their motivation and confidence to learn.

“Adding It Up: Helping Children Learn Mathematics” by National Research Council, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, Center for Education, Mathematics Learning Study Committee, Bradford Findell, Jane Swafford, Jeremy Kilpatrick
from Adding It Up: Helping Children Learn Mathematics
by National Research Council, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, et. al.
National Academies Press, 2001

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

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3 comments

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  • remember parents, you must not ask what your teachers should or shouldn’t do, like teach questionable material using laugalably questionable methods and grading measures

  • My teacher, is quite scary, whatever you just said, doesn’t happen with my teacher,
    don’t get me wrong, she is not a bad teacher, but she is scary, I didn’t finish my homework because I spender my night doing the wrong sheet.
    And now she’s mad, and will tell my dad about it in the interview tomorrow.
    My teacher doesn’t ask for the new improvements, doesn’t review my weaknesses, and I am sad, nervous, and I want some help…

  • WEB: The Ninth Circuit case, Fields v. Palmdale School District, was brought by parents who discovered that their sevento ten-year-old children had been required to fill out a 79-question nosy questionnaire about such matters as “thinking about having sex,” “thinking about touching other people’s private parts,” and “wanting to kill myself.” The decision claimed that the purpose of the psychological sex survey was “to improve students’ ability to learn.”

    The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit ruled on November 2, 2005 that parents’ fundamental right to control the upbringing of their children “does not extend beyond the threshold of the school door,” and that a public school has the right to provide its students with “whatever information it wishes to provide, sexual or otherwise.”