These Common Meds May Increase Chance of Chronic Kidney Disease

 

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TUESDAY, Oct. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) A common type of heartburn medication called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) seem to be linked with increased risk of chronic kidney disease, two new studies suggest. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) — one of the top 10 classes of prescribed medications in the United States — may be an independent risk factor for chronic kidney disease (CKD), finds two new papers published in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. Apr. 14, 2016 — Patients who took proton pump inhibitors for heartburn, acid reflux, or ulcers had an increased risk of kidney function decline, chronic kidney disease, and kidney failure.

The. Medications for heartburn called proton pump inhibitors are linked to a higher risk for chronic kidney disease, according to a study. It’s the latest in a growing list of worries with these drugs. Diabetes, the leading cause of chronic kidney disease, is more common in these groups. Also, high blood pressure, the second leading cause of chronic kidney disease, appears more often in African Americans than in other ethnic groups.

Many experts believe these groups may have an inherited tendency to develop these diseases. This content is provided as a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of the National Institutes of Health. The NIDDK translates and disseminates research findings to increase knowledge and understanding about health and disease among patients, health professionals, and the public. A type of heartburn medication called proton pump inhibitors may be linked to long-term kidney damage, a new study suggests. Prilosec, Nexium and Prevacid belong to this class of drugs.

In addition to lowering blood pressure, these medications reduce protein in the urine, a risk factor for developing kidney disease. Managing blood sugar, blood pressure, and cholesterol levels is very important because these are all risk factors for heart disease and stroke. Two new studies have found that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), a common medication used to treat heartburn, are associated with chronic kidney disease. PPIs are among the most commonly prescribed drugs in the U.S.

Some PPIs are also available as over-the-counter medications. Common Acid Reflux Medications Linked to Increased Kidney Disease Risk February 19, 2019 | Heather Buschman, PhD Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), which include well-known brand names Prilosec, Nexium and Prevacid, are among the most commonly prescribed medications in the world.

List of related literature:

However, the US Food and Drug Administration (2009) warns that it may increase the risk for kidney problems; labeling changes include dosing cautions and contraindications in patients with renal impairment.

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ACE inhibitors and, more recently, angiotensin­receptor blockers have been shown to slow progression of kidney failure more than would be expected from their effect on blood pressure control alone, especially among diabetics and patients with proteinuria.

“Primary Care Medicine: Office Evaluation and Management of The Adult Patient: Sixth Edition” by Allan H Goroll, Albert G Mulley, Jr.
from Primary Care Medicine: Office Evaluation and Management of The Adult Patient: Sixth Edition
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However, the FDA (2009) warns that it may increase the risk for kidney problems; labeling changes include dosing cautions and contraindications in patients with renal impairment.

“Foundations and Adult Health Nursing E-Book” by Kim Cooper, Kelly Gosnell
from Foundations and Adult Health Nursing E-Book
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Patients with renal impairment are at increased risk for hypoglycemia, and drugs should be initiated and titrated cautiously.32 Various antidiabetic drugs depend on renal excretion, and accumulation in renal impairment can cause adverse effects.33 Management of diabetes in CKD is discussed in Chapter 32.

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from Comprehensive Clinical Nephrology E-Book
by Richard J. Johnson, John Feehally, et. al.
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The elderly kidney is also sensitive to the effects of drugs, especially NSAIDs, which cause vasoconstriction and a decline in GFR and may be implicated in Ralph’s AKI (Jefferson et al., 2010).

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from Nursing the Acutely Ill Adult
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The people with kidney disease reported taking both drugs two and a half times more frequently than the controls, suggesting that these drugs may have aggravated kidney disease.

“Coping with Kidney Disease: A 12-Step Treatment Program to Help You Avoid Dialysis” by Mackenzie Walser, Betsy Thorpe
from Coping with Kidney Disease: A 12-Step Treatment Program to Help You Avoid Dialysis
by Mackenzie Walser, Betsy Thorpe
Wiley, 2010

Based on the high prevalence of chronic kidney disease in older adults, drug dosing in the elderly requires caution, as there is risk for renal injury from ischemia as well as medications with nephrotoxic effects [13].

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from Geriatric Gastroenterology
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Springer New York, 2012

Patients on dialysis are more likely to have side effects from medications, possibly because they metabolize medications more slowly than patients with normal renal function.

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from 100 Questions & Answers About Kidney Dialysis
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Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2009

Exposure to potentially nephrotoxic medications is particularly common in patients with CKD, which further suggests that AKI could have increasingly important effects on the incidence of CKD.

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from Comprehensive Clinical Nephrology E-Book
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This risk seems to begin with mild kidney disease and extends to patients undergoing conventional hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis.

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Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
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15 comments

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  • There are many factors in reducing kidney disease quickly. One plan I found which successfully combines these is the Jaylands Kidney Kit (google it if you’re interested) definately the no.1 resource that I’ve seen. look at the great info.

  • Kidney Disease is a very serious illness. Never underestimate also what’s causing it. Kidney disease is a silent killer, because it has no symptoms at all in the first stage.

  • Hello Doctor, I’m Sweet Sagabay from Philippines and have a kidney chronic disease from more five years ago having my dialysis…
    I just wanted to asking you if I still have a cure for my kidney chronic disease???

  • Hi guys! My sour bread is REALLY healthy. Packed with nutrients, easy digestible protein, fiber, vitamins and minerals…. If interested ill share my easy recipe with you!

  • If you see this, I have stage 4 chronic kidney disease. (Also my grandpa went to the Mayo Clinic for about 2 years for cancer) but I have a question, I believe my nephrology, maybe my urologist, but one of them said I may be at higher chance for some kind of cancer. I can’t remember exactly what but do you have any thoughts? I was misdiagnosed as a baby, and had to have emergency surgery at the children’s hospital. Around 9 I had a mitrofanoff procedure. Just thought I’d share, thanks!

  • You CAN have Healthy Kidneys’… and live an active, healthy life where you never even THINK about your kidneys IF YOU KNOW THE RIGHT THINGS TO DO!

  • can you give an example of what might cause kidney damage other than high blood pressure or diabetes? I have my blood pressure under control and don’t have diabetes and still declining

  • There are a few ideas worth trying

    drink plenty of water.

    eat watermelon that helps prevent kidney disease.

    try taking pomegranate seeds and drink organge juice these help cure kidney disease.

    avoid meat, cucumber, radish and fizzy drinks.

    (I read these and the reasons they work on Jaylands kidney kit website )

  • Thank you Dr Albright. Should also be noted that several clinical trials have already confirmed safety and efficacy of stem cells, and in particular of MSC+ kidney cell based therapies for patients with renal diseases or previous kidney transplants.

  • May I suggest…Proactive measures to help people..at 75% not 60% EGFR. Change your lab requisitions to 75 please. You can keep your field but focus on renal health and preservation sooner. 60% is way too stressful on us humans. We must not sacrafice our selves in the name of “science”. Science needs to change their focus to wellness preservation.

  • I have a very sneaking suspicion your lab requisitions need to be updated instead of having the bar at less than 60 on the EFGR you need to bring it up to less than 75…that is 75 percent of kidney function. If we know our kidneys are starting to struggle at an earlier rather than at 60% we could avoid the crowning of many people as being “chronically” anything. It is almost as if we are being observed into illness and not proactively kept healthy. Did you mention Aspirin and Tylenol as damaging to kidneys? Or should I just say all and any Drugs you take often?..or what about Weed…both pharma and drama reducing dispensary…warn people not to be reliant on anything but clean non polluted air and non gmo foods…um…good luck. We are….

  • Kidney Disease awerness and management during current situation of Covid https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLURC-ivbwbsJmOjIk8pDtAgjT7UcmtaFC

  • My mother reached stage 5 two weeks ago ever since she reached upper stage 3 that’s when the symptoms and complications started. After her hospitalization 2 weeks ago when she officially crossed over to stage 5 they’re trying sodium bicarbonate therapy to preserve what little function she has left and to help with high potassium. My mother is old but other than CKD has no real serious health issues i want them to consider dialysis because I believe her life is worth prolonging my father would not have been a good candidate due to cancer, stroke, diabetes etc. so I realize not everyone is but I cannot see why my mother would not be unless taking into consideration her age. She’s been an active person most don’t even believe her age so I’m struggling with not wanting to watch her be terminal and not survive to year’s end I will always fight for my mother and her right to live longer✌��

  • And taking toxic systemic medications that destroy the kidneys, but no one is talking about that. Cigarettes.. pfff dont make me laugh.
    Giving teens cycles of toxic antibiotics for acne and stimulants for school, having everyone in america on some kind of prescription.. people popping painkillers on a daily basis that’s why your kidneys are failing ladies and gentleman
    Screw the entire medical establishment massacring us.

  • I have kidney problems, I am 23 years old, I live in Bangladesh, sir I’m showing a lot of doctors but the problem is increasing day by day, please tell me what I can do for it