There Is Lots More to Menopause Than Menopausal Flashes

 

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5 easy tips to help ease hot flushes

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News flash about hot flashes: They can last longer than you think

Video taken from the channel: Mayo Clinic


There’s A Lot More to Menopause Than Hot Flashes There’s A Lot More to Menopause Than Hot Flashes In this first part of our two-part series, a leading menopause specialist discusses common misconceptions, changes in physical health and weight gain. Jaimie Seaton. There’s A Lot More to Menopause Than Hot Flashes | HealthyWomen Share on: Dr. Barb DePree, director of the Women’s Midlife Services at Holland Hospital, founder of MiddlesexMD and a member of HealthyWomen’s Women’s Health Advisory Council, answers. Almost 80 percent of women do get hot flashes, night sweats or both during menopause, the researchers found.

But the timing of these symptoms and how long they last appear to vary a. Hot flashes are one of the most common signs of perimenopause, the years leading up to menopause. Menopause, when your period stops for good, typically happens between age 45 and 55. I am going to get more tests, but I really wondered if others on here experienced menopause with similar symptoms. I have seen posts in other forums indicating women have.

And didn’t have hot flashes. Responses to this thread reflect my point we seem to think menopause is primarily hot flashes. But if you dig deeper, that’s not true.

Researchers found that each 11-pound decrease in weight yielded 33 percent greater odds of improvement in hot flashes. It’s not entirely clear why overweight women suffer more; some theorize that excess fat traps heat, leading to more sweating and flushing to cool the body; or that obese women’s blood vessels react differently to heat or stress. Many people also feel cold or get chills as the hot flash lets up.

Hot flashes are a common symptom of menopause. Women undergoing menopause can experience hot flashes as often as several times a. More than two-thirds of North American women who are heading into menopause have hot flashes. They also affect women who start menopause after chemotherapy or surgery to remove their ovaries.

What. And while the medicalization and media attention to menopause in the last decade have increased (Japan, too, has a baby-boomer crop of women), rates of hot flashes remain considerably lower there than among white Americans or Japanese-Americans. A 2008 U.S. study found that 30% of women still had hot flashes 10 to 19 years after menopause, and so did 20% who were more than 20 years past menopause.

A 2011 study of more than 8,000 Latin American women found that more than 60% reported these symptoms 12 years after menopause.

List of related literature:

The most widely acknowledged symptom of menopause menopausal is the women.8 hot flash, In occurring women without in about breast 75% cancer, of all obesity, smoking, physical inactivity, and stress increase hot flash frequency and severity.

“The Breast E-Book: Comprehensive Management of Benign and Malignant Diseases” by Kirby I. Bland, Edward M. Copeland, V. Suzanne Klimberg
from The Breast E-Book: Comprehensive Management of Benign and Malignant Diseases
by Kirby I. Bland, Edward M. Copeland, V. Suzanne Klimberg
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2009

Concerning menopause: “… about 10 to 15% of women who have hot flashes have them very frequently and severely.

“History of the Soyfoods Movement Worldwide (1960s-2019): Extensively Annotated Bibliography and Sourcebook” by William Shurtleff; Akiko Aoyagi
from History of the Soyfoods Movement Worldwide (1960s-2019): Extensively Annotated Bibliography and Sourcebook
by William Shurtleff; Akiko Aoyagi
Soyinfo Center, 2019

However, some women have hot flashes before menopause and continue to have them for 10 or more years afterward.

“Maternity and Women's Health Care E-Book” by Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Shannon E. Perry, Mary Catherine Cashion, Kathryn Rhodes Alden
from Maternity and Women’s Health Care E-Book
by Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Shannon E. Perry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2014

Therefore, regardless of the cause of menopause, natural, surgical, or estrogen withdrawal caused by a long-acting GnRH agonist, hot flashes are associated with an acute and significant drop in estrogen level.

“Williams Textbook of Endocrinology” by Henry Kronenberg, Shlomo Melmed, Kenneth S. Polonsky, P. Reed Larsen
from Williams Textbook of Endocrinology
by Henry Kronenberg, Shlomo Melmed, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2007

A woman in her fifties recalled that when her mother was experiencing menopause and had all the symptoms associated with the condition such as hot flashes, her physician never explained to her that she was experiencing menopause.

“Encyclopedia of Medical Anthropology: Health and Illness in the World's Cultures Topics Volume 1; Cultures -” by Carol R. Ember, Melvin Ember
from Encyclopedia of Medical Anthropology: Health and Illness in the World’s Cultures Topics Volume 1; Cultures –
by Carol R. Ember, Melvin Ember
Springer US, 2003

The hot flash is the hallmark symptom of menopause.

“Andreoli and Carpenter's Cecil Essentials of Medicine E-Book” by Ivor Benjamin, Robert C. Griggs, Thomas E. Andreoli, J. Gregory Fitz, Edward J Wing
from Andreoli and Carpenter’s Cecil Essentials of Medicine E-Book
by Ivor Benjamin, Robert C. Griggs, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

Perhaps the most common of the symptoms associated with estrogen loss—affecting approximately 75 percent of women having a natural menopause and 90 percent of those having a surgical menopause—are hot flashes.

“The New Harvard Guide to Women's Health” by Karen J. Carlson, Stephanie A. Eisenstat, Stephanie A. Eisenstat, M.D., Terra Diane Ziporyn, Alvin & Nancy Baird Library Fund, Harvard University. Press
from The New Harvard Guide to Women’s Health
by Karen J. Carlson, Stephanie A. Eisenstat, et. al.
Harvard University Press, 2004

The most common symptom of menopause, experienced by over 75% of menopausal women in the United States, is the occurrence of hot flashes (or hot flushes).

“Human Reproductive Biology” by Richard E. Jones, Kristin H Lopez
from Human Reproductive Biology
by Richard E. Jones, Kristin H Lopez
Elsevier Science, 2013

Hot flashes are the most common symptom of menopause affecting over 75% of women.

“The ADA Practical Guide to Patients with Medical Conditions” by Lauren L. Patton, American Dental Association
from The ADA Practical Guide to Patients with Medical Conditions
by Lauren L. Patton, American Dental Association
Wiley, 2012

Regardless of the cause of menopause—natural, surgical, or estrogen withdrawal caused by a GnRH agonist—hot flashes are associated with an acute and significant drop in estrogen level.

“Williams Textbook of Endocrinology” by Shlomo Melmed, MBChB, MACP, Kenneth S. Polonsky, MD, P. Reed Larsen, MD, FRCP, Henry M. Kronenberg, MD
from Williams Textbook of Endocrinology
by Shlomo Melmed, MBChB, MACP, Kenneth S. Polonsky, MD, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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51 comments

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  • These hot flashes creep up on me like a shadow. I’m on hormone replacement therapy. Ever since I began my depot estradiol injections they became more frequent. It’s like a whiplash and suddenly no warning you get lightheaded and body turns really hot and you become disoriented for a few seconds. It’s very strange.

  • Hi Shellea, I love your videos ❣
    How do you take Maca powder?
    I got it from a different place before I’ve seen your video and it tastes awful ��

  • I had my first hot flash at 61 yrs old while at work. It scared me cause I didnt know what it was so went to ER. My doctor says she has sisters in their 70s and 1 in her 80s, and they have them.

  • Gr8 video, tks. I am 57, no period for a few years now. But still battling wth fatigue, low blood sugar, low mood, skin breakouts ����. Adrenals? I eat a v healthy plant based diet, no gluten, sugar etc. But if i take any adaptogens i end up v emotional, hugely depressed, cry all the time, get insomnia (& i sleep well now), i also sweat a lot more. I end up stopping them a few days later because i feel a lot worse. Started Ashwagandha again yest, had a terrible night, feel more down than before. Should i jst be more patient, will it get better?? Am sooooo frustrated! Tks. Hugs ��

  • To any women out there suffering from hot flashes and night sweats due to perimenopause:

    Try “OMAD” (which means “one meal a day”) and eliminating caffeine and alcohol! It really does wonders. It took me about a week and now I have zero issues with hot flashes etc, it’s all GONE.

    OMAD works for me (and I’m currently experimenting with TMAD, which means “two meals a day”), maybe it can help you too.

    In my own experience fasting is amazing and incredibly beneficial.

    But I recommend you do some research on it yourself before you try so you know what to expect and what happens in your body etc.

    I’m not an expert and I don’t have any medical background, I’m just sharing what has worked for me so you have to do your own experimenting and research to find out what works for you.

    And if it works for you too, consider ‘liking’ this comment or leave a comment on it so that other women can be inspired by your experiences as well! ��

  • I’m in my 60’s and get mini hot flashes. I call them mini because of the hot flashes that made me feel like a firey furnace years ago.
    Also, my metabolism changed. I used to feel chilled to freezing and the hotter it got in summer the better I felt and didn’t turn on the AC unit until August when the humidity was very high.
    Now, I’m warm to hot blooded. Winter is now my favorite season and unless it’s frigidly freezing, I sleep with the window open with a blanket. Before, I’d been wearing long underwear with piles of blankets and stuff the door/window to keep out a hint of cold.
    Its just weird! But, is my new normal!

  • I love the idea of treating menopause symptoms naturally. I do some of these myself and notice what a big difference they make! I’ll test the others on myself too! Thank you!!

  • Yes, in the evenings,I try to to be comfortable so I can fall to sleep,but the hot flashes and the wetness wakes me up.Our country has 2climates,and it is really hot day and nights for me,thank you Dr. For all the informations

  • Hi, thanks a lot Eileen for the information. I have been recommended to drink corriander seed water, which is an Ayurvedic remedy for hot flashes. I have noticed the number of my hot flashes reducing since. Fingers crossed!

  • I get these hot flashes now. I’ve been getting them since July of last year. I honestly hate being a female. I wish I was born a male. We go through too much crap

  • I sleep with a frozen icepack that I had filled to the brim with water and leave in the freezer until bedtime. I have two, but plan on getting another for daytime. I am way too young for this.

  • I can so relate to what you shared. Thank you for your help. I purchased the progesterone with vitamin E and it is very sticky to apply on the gums, especially since it needs to be refrigerated. Any tips? Thank you and love your channel.

  • I am 54 and I am up with hot flashes and night sweats six times a night it’s affecting my overall health.Did what my health provider said took Effexor and my word my life will never be the same,it’s like I had a stroke it’s sucks I’m suffering so bad!

  • Hi Schellea, this advice sounds great and I’ll be buying what you suggest. Can you please tell me the brand of your wig and what it’s called and also the colour please. You look stunning in it so I’d like to get the same one. Thanking you kindly, Natalie

  • I would love a video of how and when you take these? Do you mix any of them together or separate at the same time? I need a routine so I will stay with it. lol

  • I’m told by my Asian Indian Ob/Gyn Ashwaganda can cause bleeding and spotting and its long term use isn’t advised. I started taking it and started spotting, I’m on BHRT. So she told me to stop taking it.

  • It’s refreshing to see that someone recognizes hot flashes are not a mental issue and doesn’t start in our minds but in our bodies.

  • Hello Shelly, I’ve been trying to find info on whether Progest E can increase breast cancer risk for women with a history of breast cancer in their family, but I haven’t found anything really definitive online. Has your research given you any insights into this?

  • I had my hysterectomy at the age of 24 I’m about to be 36. I was young n fooling around caught HPV which then turned to cervical cancer I decided to get everything removed all at once and it was the biggest mistake of my life. I’m in so much pain every day. I threw my life away. I’m struggling real hard being a single mom and I totally quit dating. I don’t work. I was unemployed when I got my surgery. I’ve been unemployed ever since. I don’t know where to go from here. I’m searching for all kinds of info. I’m trying to make changes in my life style. my family can’t care for me forever. Im being optimistic but I’m having the hardest time. I recently started going through a spiritual awakening and all the info out there has helped me a lot mentally. Anyone else willing to share any info you think will help I’d appreciate it so much.

  • Hello, Thank You for this wonderful video. I am 48 and have been going through very similar journey since 42. Trial and error mostly done on my own. I am using most of the suppleness you mentioned.
    Will try the Maca which I’ve been reading about recently and haven’t used yet.
    I do have a question for you to see if you have had or heard about others going through this as I haven’t resolved this yet. Through this stage of peri menopause in past year ( I’m 7 mos. no period) I am getting a lot of bigger muscular pain issues, frozen shoulder, sprained back etc. I exercise and do yoga gently regularly. Through blood tests nothing shows up so I am on my own with this. I feel it’s the loss of estrogen or low progesterone. I use an essential oil now meant to balance progesterone. I was using a cream for a while and stopped it. Didn’t seem to make a difference.
    Not sure if you know if any of the supplements you mentioned may help more with this. I also am currently taking D3 + K for two weeks because my D was showing low. Thank You so much again ����

  • Hello, I’d be grateful if you could tell me how much slippery elm bark powder you take with your yogurt, I looked online but couldn’t find any definite info.

  • Very helpful Thank you so much for sharing I am going to add a few of these to my daily routine. I am 52 and have been dealing with Hot Flashes/ Sleep deprivation for about 5 6 years and I found Maca helped ALOT! I am from Canada and five years ago I found Brad Kings Liquid Maca that has an 18:1 potency and I take it every morning (1 tsp) in a shot glass with cold water. (taste isn’t great but you get used to it) I notice my energy decreases and HF increase when I stop taking it. I recently found a menopause supplement called Meno Supreme ( Health First is the product line) it has 85 mg of Hops extract, black Kohosh, & Sage in it. My hot flashes are completely gone! I take it at night as the Hops has been used for treatment of insomnia and I now sleep like a baby. This supplement has changed my life! So with this and the Maca I finally feel like I am a normal human being again!

    You have a lot of great videos and I am not sure if you have done one that focuses on what adrenal fatigue is and how it affects women but if not then It would be great to learn more about it from you. Thanks!

  • Hi love your video.So far I am not going through menopause I wish I was I’m 55 and bleed like a teenager every month. I am sure it should be soon I did have a week a month ago where I was so hot in the middle of the night for about 1 hr and it went away.I would be grateful if I only experienced hot flashes at night I watch my co worker burst into flames from time to time lol poor lady really

  • Hi Schellea, thank-you so much for your awesome workout vids. At this stage you’re my mentor. So much gratitude to you. I’m turning 60 this November….daunting as it is. Lol. You’re vids are so helpful and insightful,I’m humbly grateful for it all. Thanks so much,lovely lady,you are as beautiful inside as out.sistah. xx

  • To any women out there suffering from hot flashes and night sweats due to perimenopause:

    Try “OMAD” (which means “one meal a day”) and eliminating caffeine and alcohol! It really does wonders. It took me about a week and now I have zero issues with hot flashes etc, it’s all GONE.

    OMAD works for me (and I’m currently experimenting with TMAD, which means “two meals a day”), maybe it can help you too.

    In my own experience fasting is amazing and incredibly beneficial.

    But I recommend you do some research on it yourself before you try so you know what to expect and what happens in your body etc.

    I’m not an expert and I don’t have any medical background, I’m just sharing what has worked for me so you have to do your own experimenting and research to find out what works for you.

    And if it works for you too, consider ‘liking’ this comment or leave a comment on it so that other women can be inspired by your experiences as well! ��

  • I’m going thru perimenopause now������ hot flash, headfog, fatigue, does anyone experience joint pains? I don’t know what supplements to take��

  • This video is very insightful. Managing symptoms naturally is probably the best way. That being said, would you share your experience with HRT? Have you ever tried HRT, and are you taking them with what your doing now? I’ve read that without HRT there can be high risks of multiple cancers. �� this kind of data is disturbing and makes some woman feel like we are doomed ☹️��What are your thoughts regarding this matter. Your channel has helped me so much!!! I’d be so grateful to get your feedback. Sincere thanks,����������

  • Very helpful video thanks, I will try the maca regime. I’m very interested in gut health overall, and links to other diseases such as dementia.

  • Key thing here, go to a naturopath and get an extensive blood test it’s the only way to find out what your levels are. I don’t have any symptoms either because that’s what I did too. It’s not about guess work.

  • Thank you for sharing. I started having really bad hot flashes after I had my hysterectomy. about 10 years ago. Ive tried over the counter stuff which did not help very much. I refuse to take artificial hormones. I suffer from memory loss, i have problems keep healthy weight and I sweat like I just jumped out of the shower. I don’t know if I can afford to take all the things you are taking but i will definitely do my best to try some. I NEED HELP.

  • Thank you for sharing your knowledge. Have you ever done HRT? Gosh, there are so many mixed messages about this do woman really need this? And are we at risk if we don’t take hormones. I’d really appreciate your feedback ����

  • What would you recommend I try first for insomnia? I know it’s from my fluctuating hormones as I’m perimenopausal. I’ve tried melatonin and valerian but they don’t work that well. Thanks ��

  • Love maca! 100% notice when I don’t take it for too long. Also, love spiralina and Chlorella! Basically no menopause symptoms at 52!

  • Are you saying that we should only take natural progesterone and not natural testosterone/dhea/ (or other)? Please I need to know why. Thanks.

  • Hi Shellea!! I love your videos, thanks
    You’re so beautiful ��
    I’m 42 and I’m wondering when is the right time to start using all this products…
    I’m so tired every day, I’m losing my energy and I been having hot flashes…
    Thanks �� ����

  • Hello Beautiful Lady, I would love to know how you take each one, mix it,straight up? I’m 55 and desperate for relief!
    Thank you so much, I’m missing the Gold Coast when I hear your lovely accent.

  • Love your videos!
    Do you, or does anyone on here, know of a UK supplier for the progesterone? the shipping from the U.S is going to cost more than the product:-(

  • Thank you for your wonderful advise and encouragement to all of us over 50s gals we all feel young like you and don’t wanna led things just slide.

  • Remifemerin is good for me, also a cold pack wrapped in a towel to sleep on! I finally got in for my thyroid, and since starting medication, I seem to be entering full menopause, with only 5 periods this year at age 54.

  • I wanted to ask you a question because I always research products before I use them. I cam across these side effects using progesterone. I came across this:KENOGEN Dr Peat’s Kenogen Progest-E Complex 34ml/1.15oz KENOGEN Dr Peat’s Kenogen Progest-E Complex 34ml/1.15oz

    Super Special! Contains: Natural vitamin E oil, vegetable triglycerides, and natural progesterone.

    In this 10% solution of Progest-E Complex, one drop contains about three milligrams of progesterone.

    *A Patented Formula

    Preferred Storage: Refrigeration

    California Proposition 65 WARNING: This product contains progesterone, a chemical known to the State of California to cause cancer. Consult with your physician before using this product.

    (Only for the State of California since they combine synthetic and natural progesterone studies.)

    And this: Risks. Progesterone may raise your risk of:

    Breast cancer

    Ovarian cancer

    Heart problems

    Blood clotting problems

    Stroke

    Endometriosis

    Uterine fibroids
    Avoid using this product if you are pregnant unless prescribed by your doctor. Also avoid if you have:

    Allergy or sensitivity to progesterone

    Liver problems

    History of cancer of the breast or genitals

    Bleeding or clotting problems

    Vaginal bleeding that your doctor has not checked

    Use this product with caution if you have:

    Heart problems

    Kidney problems

    Seizures

    Migraine headaches

    Asthma

    DepressionMy mom, dad, 3 sisters, 2 nieces and one great niece all died of cancer. I think I would rather deal with hot flashes than to subject my body to a possible cause of cancer. Please let me know what your thoughts are, as we are always learning! Thank You!!!

  • I’m 57 and just started perimenopause, hot flashes doing my head in, I’m a health freak and still can’t sort this sorted out but almost there, sage in my meals, magSRT IMRS product, life wave patches, Dr Wallace products, Dr Carolyn Dean minerals and magnesium product, you name it I am doing so I’ve decided I’m going to regenerate my ovaries and get my monthlys going again, yeah people say that’s not possible, watch me, better than these dreaded hot flushes

  • I tried Adrenal support tablets for 4 months, but no difference to my hot flushes. They’re the worst part for me, especially living in Queensland during summer.
    Will def try the oil and maca powder. Maybe vitamin D too.
    Thanks.

  • Great video! I take several of the products you mentioned but am definitely going to get the progest e oil! Thank you for sharing what has made a difference for you, it’s very helpful. xoxo

  • At 46 this is ESSENTIAL info.
    Especially since I’m not into the hormone therapy my OB has talked about.
    With 2 young kiddos under the age of 8 I want to have as much quality time as possible. I haven’t skipped periods yet so OB says not in menopause but my primary Dr. says it’s absolutely possible I’m in peri menopause. Your video helps so much that I’m not crazy. And not alone.

  • Thank you so much Schelly I have just turned 56 and thoroughly enjoy your channel with so many helpful hints. My husband and I are coming over to Australia at the end of August from NZ and doing a road trip from Sydney to Sunshine coast. I believe you are in Coffs Harbour so can you suggest any must see sights we might find on the way please?

  • Good for you. I appreciate your channel that’s educating women. We need to support one another. Everyone has different symptoms. It’s okay if your symptoms don’t change. Just rolling with it best I can.

  • Thanks for the vid! I am always interested in the arsenal of over 50 lady-hood.
    Every night about an hour before bed I drink CalMag Plus with Vitamin C & D3. Mix it up, add an ice cube, delicious flavor. Helps relax the body, rebuild and repair tissue. Everyday I rub a 3rd of a teaspoon of Source Naturals Progesterone Cream into my skin to release 22 mcg progesterone relieves all my symptoms. I also take daily: Vitamin C, Liquid B Complex, 1 Carlson’s Fish Oil and 2 Gaia Adrenal Health with Rhodiola and Holy Basil for upbeat spark and energy.

  • This is spot on! All the things you said I have researched myself and tried with the exception of the progesteronewhich I may try now. I also have adrenal fatigue, and I am slowly improving my adrenals with a better-balanced diet, losing weight, no sugar, no caffeine, and no dairy. It seems extreme but it’s working. Thank you for passing along the message to other women who maybe suffering.:-)

  • Gud morning Ma’am… My grandmother is 83y.o. already,.. She is high blood with type 2 diabetes… Almost every night she feels extremely hot flashes then after she will chill pls. Tell me what to do….

  • Im 47 in a month, have periods every 30 days 1 month, next 2 weeks late sometimes, did sono. All uterus and ovaries are healthy.
    Im getying hot glushes often, and sores on the dide of my tongue.
    Should i be concerned?

  • True but It’s also to do with magnesium deficiencies as well as other things, google Dr Carolyn Dean, on one of her you tubes she talks about magnesium and hot flushes as she had problems with hot flushes. As soon as I started using her products the hot flushes disappeared and I also used these natural patches which has helped me with lots of other health problems as well, phew no more horrible hot flushes.
    https://lifewave.com/1050897