There Is Lots More to Menopause Than Menopausal Flashes

 

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There’s A Lot More to Menopause Than Hot Flashes There’s A Lot More to Menopause Than Hot Flashes In this first part of our two-part series, a leading menopause specialist discusses common misconceptions, changes in physical health and weight gain. Jaimie Seaton. There’s A Lot More to Menopause Than Hot Flashes | HealthyWomen Share on: Dr. Barb DePree, director of the Women’s Midlife Services at Holland Hospital, founder of MiddlesexMD and a member of HealthyWomen’s Women’s Health Advisory Council, answers. Almost 80 percent of women do get hot flashes, night sweats or both during menopause, the researchers found.

But the timing of these symptoms and how long they last appear to vary a. Hot flashes are one of the most common signs of perimenopause, the years leading up to menopause. Menopause, when your period stops for good, typically happens between age 45 and 55. I am going to get more tests, but I really wondered if others on here experienced menopause with similar symptoms. I have seen posts in other forums indicating women have.

And didn’t have hot flashes. Responses to this thread reflect my point we seem to think menopause is primarily hot flashes. But if you dig deeper, that’s not true.

Researchers found that each 11-pound decrease in weight yielded 33 percent greater odds of improvement in hot flashes. It’s not entirely clear why overweight women suffer more; some theorize that excess fat traps heat, leading to more sweating and flushing to cool the body; or that obese women’s blood vessels react differently to heat or stress. Many people also feel cold or get chills as the hot flash lets up.

Hot flashes are a common symptom of menopause. Women undergoing menopause can experience hot flashes as often as several times a. More than two-thirds of North American women who are heading into menopause have hot flashes. They also affect women who start menopause after chemotherapy or surgery to remove their ovaries.

What. And while the medicalization and media attention to menopause in the last decade have increased (Japan, too, has a baby-boomer crop of women), rates of hot flashes remain considerably lower there than among white Americans or Japanese-Americans. A 2008 U.S. study found that 30% of women still had hot flashes 10 to 19 years after menopause, and so did 20% who were more than 20 years past menopause.

A 2011 study of more than 8,000 Latin American women found that more than 60% reported these symptoms 12 years after menopause.

List of related literature:

The most widely acknowledged symptom of menopause menopausal is the women.8 hot flash, In occurring women without in about breast 75% cancer, of all obesity, smoking, physical inactivity, and stress increase hot flash frequency and severity.

“The Breast E-Book: Comprehensive Management of Benign and Malignant Diseases” by Kirby I. Bland, Edward M. Copeland, V. Suzanne Klimberg
from The Breast E-Book: Comprehensive Management of Benign and Malignant Diseases
by Kirby I. Bland, Edward M. Copeland, V. Suzanne Klimberg
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2009

Concerning menopause: “… about 10 to 15% of women who have hot flashes have them very frequently and severely.

“History of the Soyfoods Movement Worldwide (1960s-2019): Extensively Annotated Bibliography and Sourcebook” by William Shurtleff; Akiko Aoyagi
from History of the Soyfoods Movement Worldwide (1960s-2019): Extensively Annotated Bibliography and Sourcebook
by William Shurtleff; Akiko Aoyagi
Soyinfo Center, 2019

However, some women have hot flashes before menopause and continue to have them for 10 or more years afterward.

“Maternity and Women's Health Care E-Book” by Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Shannon E. Perry, Mary Catherine Cashion, Kathryn Rhodes Alden
from Maternity and Women’s Health Care E-Book
by Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Shannon E. Perry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2014

Therefore, regardless of the cause of menopause, natural, surgical, or estrogen withdrawal caused by a long-acting GnRH agonist, hot flashes are associated with an acute and significant drop in estrogen level.

“Williams Textbook of Endocrinology” by Henry Kronenberg, Shlomo Melmed, Kenneth S. Polonsky, P. Reed Larsen
from Williams Textbook of Endocrinology
by Henry Kronenberg, Shlomo Melmed, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2007

A woman in her fifties recalled that when her mother was experiencing menopause and had all the symptoms associated with the condition such as hot flashes, her physician never explained to her that she was experiencing menopause.

“Encyclopedia of Medical Anthropology: Health and Illness in the World's Cultures Topics Volume 1; Cultures -” by Carol R. Ember, Melvin Ember
from Encyclopedia of Medical Anthropology: Health and Illness in the World’s Cultures Topics Volume 1; Cultures –
by Carol R. Ember, Melvin Ember
Springer US, 2003

The hot flash is the hallmark symptom of menopause.

“Andreoli and Carpenter's Cecil Essentials of Medicine E-Book” by Ivor Benjamin, Robert C. Griggs, Thomas E. Andreoli, J. Gregory Fitz, Edward J Wing
from Andreoli and Carpenter’s Cecil Essentials of Medicine E-Book
by Ivor Benjamin, Robert C. Griggs, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

Perhaps the most common of the symptoms associated with estrogen loss—affecting approximately 75 percent of women having a natural menopause and 90 percent of those having a surgical menopause—are hot flashes.

“The New Harvard Guide to Women's Health” by Karen J. Carlson, Stephanie A. Eisenstat, Stephanie A. Eisenstat, M.D., Terra Diane Ziporyn, Alvin & Nancy Baird Library Fund, Harvard University. Press
from The New Harvard Guide to Women’s Health
by Karen J. Carlson, Stephanie A. Eisenstat, et. al.
Harvard University Press, 2004

The most common symptom of menopause, experienced by over 75% of menopausal women in the United States, is the occurrence of hot flashes (or hot flushes).

“Human Reproductive Biology” by Richard E. Jones, Kristin H Lopez
from Human Reproductive Biology
by Richard E. Jones, Kristin H Lopez
Elsevier Science, 2013

Hot flashes are the most common symptom of menopause affecting over 75% of women.

“The ADA Practical Guide to Patients with Medical Conditions” by Lauren L. Patton, American Dental Association
from The ADA Practical Guide to Patients with Medical Conditions
by Lauren L. Patton, American Dental Association
Wiley, 2012

Regardless of the cause of menopause—natural, surgical, or estrogen withdrawal caused by a GnRH agonist—hot flashes are associated with an acute and significant drop in estrogen level.

“Williams Textbook of Endocrinology” by Shlomo Melmed, MBChB, MACP, Kenneth S. Polonsky, MD, P. Reed Larsen, MD, FRCP, Henry M. Kronenberg, MD
from Williams Textbook of Endocrinology
by Shlomo Melmed, MBChB, MACP, Kenneth S. Polonsky, MD, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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13 comments

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  • These hot flashes creep up on me like a shadow. I’m on hormone replacement therapy. Ever since I began my depot estradiol injections they became more frequent. It’s like a whiplash and suddenly no warning you get lightheaded and body turns really hot and you become disoriented for a few seconds. It’s very strange.

  • Hi Shellea, I love your videos ❣
    How do you take Maca powder?
    I got it from a different place before I’ve seen your video and it tastes awful ��

  • I had my first hot flash at 61 yrs old while at work. It scared me cause I didnt know what it was so went to ER. My doctor says she has sisters in their 70s and 1 in her 80s, and they have them.

  • Gr8 video, tks. I am 57, no period for a few years now. But still battling wth fatigue, low blood sugar, low mood, skin breakouts ����. Adrenals? I eat a v healthy plant based diet, no gluten, sugar etc. But if i take any adaptogens i end up v emotional, hugely depressed, cry all the time, get insomnia (& i sleep well now), i also sweat a lot more. I end up stopping them a few days later because i feel a lot worse. Started Ashwagandha again yest, had a terrible night, feel more down than before. Should i jst be more patient, will it get better?? Am sooooo frustrated! Tks. Hugs ��

  • To any women out there suffering from hot flashes and night sweats due to perimenopause:

    Try “OMAD” (which means “one meal a day”) and eliminating caffeine and alcohol! It really does wonders. It took me about a week and now I have zero issues with hot flashes etc, it’s all GONE.

    OMAD works for me (and I’m currently experimenting with TMAD, which means “two meals a day”), maybe it can help you too.

    In my own experience fasting is amazing and incredibly beneficial.

    But I recommend you do some research on it yourself before you try so you know what to expect and what happens in your body etc.

    I’m not an expert and I don’t have any medical background, I’m just sharing what has worked for me so you have to do your own experimenting and research to find out what works for you.

    And if it works for you too, consider ‘liking’ this comment or leave a comment on it so that other women can be inspired by your experiences as well! ��

  • I’m in my 60’s and get mini hot flashes. I call them mini because of the hot flashes that made me feel like a firey furnace years ago.
    Also, my metabolism changed. I used to feel chilled to freezing and the hotter it got in summer the better I felt and didn’t turn on the AC unit until August when the humidity was very high.
    Now, I’m warm to hot blooded. Winter is now my favorite season and unless it’s frigidly freezing, I sleep with the window open with a blanket. Before, I’d been wearing long underwear with piles of blankets and stuff the door/window to keep out a hint of cold.
    Its just weird! But, is my new normal!

  • I love the idea of treating menopause symptoms naturally. I do some of these myself and notice what a big difference they make! I’ll test the others on myself too! Thank you!!

  • Yes, in the evenings,I try to to be comfortable so I can fall to sleep,but the hot flashes and the wetness wakes me up.Our country has 2climates,and it is really hot day and nights for me,thank you Dr. For all the informations

  • Hi, thanks a lot Eileen for the information. I have been recommended to drink corriander seed water, which is an Ayurvedic remedy for hot flashes. I have noticed the number of my hot flashes reducing since. Fingers crossed!

  • I get these hot flashes now. I’ve been getting them since July of last year. I honestly hate being a female. I wish I was born a male. We go through too much crap

  • I sleep with a frozen icepack that I had filled to the brim with water and leave in the freezer until bedtime. I have two, but plan on getting another for daytime. I am way too young for this.

  • I can so relate to what you shared. Thank you for your help. I purchased the progesterone with vitamin E and it is very sticky to apply on the gums, especially since it needs to be refrigerated. Any tips? Thank you and love your channel.

  • I am 54 and I am up with hot flashes and night sweats six times a night it’s affecting my overall health.Did what my health provider said took Effexor and my word my life will never be the same,it’s like I had a stroke it’s sucks I’m suffering so bad!