The Way Your Vagina Alterations in Midlife

 

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How Your Vagina Changes in Midlife As you age, your vagina—due mostly to decreased estrogen levels—can become dry or irritated, which can cause pain during sex. This does not. You may notice fine lines in the creases of your smile or gray hair peeking through your tresses, and even differences in your vagina. It’s true. As you age, your vagina—due mostly to decreased estrogen levels—can become dry or irritated, which can cause pain during sex.

This does not need to be the norm. Just as you use lotions to minimize fine lines and hair color to cover gray, you can manage. Less estrogen may cause the tissues of the vulva and the lining of the vagina to become thinner, drier, and less elastic or flexible. Shifting levels of hormones—especially estrogen—during the menopause transition produce changes in a woman’s body. Both the vagina and.

Is Your Vagina Having A Mid-Life Crisis? Karla Araujo April 20, 2017 1954 views. Featured Articles Health Humor Menopause Mind/Body 3 Comments 1954 views 3. I went to my gynecologist for an exam recently and we got to chatting about the indignities of the mid-life vagina. Not in the theoretical sense.

We discussed mine specifically. Vaginal changes Decreased estrogen causes the vaginal lining to thin and vaginal secretions to diminish. The vagina also becomes shorter and narrower.

The result often is dryness and irritation, which can make sexual intercourse unpleasant. Hot flashes and night sweats can linger for several years, but they will eventually get better; vaginal changes from menopause only get worse, Faubion says. During perimenopause and menopause, changing hormones can cause or contribute to the problem. According to Mayo Clinic doctors, declining estrogen and progesterone levels can interfere with your.

It’s usually caused by: natural vaginal lubrication (often milky and white) sexual arousal (think clear and watery) the start of your period (a blushed deep pink). The two hormones that most affect sexual physiology, estrogenand testosterone, tend to decrease during midlife, in both women and men. As a result of. The vagina’s size and depth changes in certain situations.

It can stretch to accommodate the insertion of a tampon, a finger, or a penis. During arousal, more.

List of related literature:

At the same time, menopause was around the corner, and ]ane was beginning to notice the small physical changes that accompany it: dry and sagging skin, less vaginal lubrication, less energy, some mood swings, and of course changes in her cycle.

“The New Sjogren's Syndrome Handbook” by Sjogren's Syndrome Foundation, Wallace Rheumatic Center Daniel J. Wallace M.D. Medical Director, Los Angeles, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center tending Physician, Los Angeles, Los Angeles School of Medicine inical Professor University of California
from The New Sjogren’s Syndrome Handbook
by Sjogren’s Syndrome Foundation, Wallace Rheumatic Center Daniel J. Wallace M.D. Medical Director, Los Angeles, et. al.
Oxford University Press, USA, 2004

Similarly, the effect of maternal hormones on the female genitalia gradually disappears; the labia majora lose their fullness, and the labia minora and hymen become thinner and flatter.

“Zitelli and Davis' Atlas of Pediatric Physical Diagnosis E-Book: Expert Consult Online” by Basil J. Zitelli, Sara C McIntire, Andrew J Nowalk
from Zitelli and Davis’ Atlas of Pediatric Physical Diagnosis E-Book: Expert Consult Online
by Basil J. Zitelli, Sara C McIntire, Andrew J Nowalk
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

As the lower genital tract undergoes atrophic changes, the labia majora lose their fat and elastic tissue content and become smaller.

“Principles and Practice of Geriatric Medicine” by M.S. John Pathy, Alan J. Sinclair, John E. Morley
from Principles and Practice of Geriatric Medicine
by M.S. John Pathy, Alan J. Sinclair, John E. Morley
Wiley, 2006

As the outer lips and vagina shrink, the urethra, clitoris, and vagina all become more exposed, the vagina becomes shorter or narrower, and pubic hair becomes sparser.

“The New Harvard Guide to Women's Health” by Karen J. Carlson, Stephanie A. Eisenstat, Stephanie A. Eisenstat, M.D., Terra Diane Ziporyn, Alvin & Nancy Baird Library Fund, Harvard University. Press
from The New Harvard Guide to Women’s Health
by Karen J. Carlson, Stephanie A. Eisenstat, et. al.
Harvard University Press, 2004

The labia majora atrophy and hair follicles decrease in number after menopause, making the labia minora more prominent.

“Berry & Kohn's Operating Room Technique E-Book” by Nancymarie Phillips
from Berry & Kohn’s Operating Room Technique E-Book
by Nancymarie Phillips
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

When estrogen levels decline and remain low, the cells lining the bladder, urethra, and vagina become fewer and thinner (atrophic) as well as more easily torn or damaged with friction (“friable”).

“Screaming to be Heard: Hormonal Connections Women Suspect... and Doctors Still Ignore” by D. Lee D. Vliet
from Screaming to be Heard: Hormonal Connections Women Suspect… and Doctors Still Ignore
by D. Lee D. Vliet
M. Evans, 2005

The vagina becomes shorter and narrower, and the vaginal epithelium atrophies.

“Rook's Textbook of Dermatology” by Tony Burns, Stephen Breathnach, Neil Cox, Christopher Griffiths
from Rook’s Textbook of Dermatology
by Tony Burns, Stephen Breathnach, et. al.
Wiley, 2008

After menopause, because of the decrease in endogenous oestrogen production, atrophic changes occur in the vagina and the distal urethra.

“Textbook of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery” by Balaji
from Textbook of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
by Balaji
Elsevier (A Divisionof Reed Elsevier India Pvt. Limited), 2009

One important physiologic change is thinning of the vaginal epithelium; another is loss of glycogen, which leads to changes in the vaginal pH and flora.

“Bratton's Family Medicine Board Review” by Robert L. Bratton
from Bratton’s Family Medicine Board Review
by Robert L. Bratton
Wolters Kluwer Health, 2012

The external genitals slowly become atrophic, and in old age the labia majora may lose their fat, revealing the labia minora.

“Llewellyn-Jones Fundamentals of Obstetrics and Gynaecology E-Book” by Jeremy J N Oats, Suzanne Abraham
from Llewellyn-Jones Fundamentals of Obstetrics and Gynaecology E-Book
by Jeremy J N Oats, Suzanne Abraham
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • It’s good news to learn that vaginal atrophy is not the end of it! You exactly say, the dermis will “oestrogenise, cornefy” but what about other tissus in the body that let us down when oestrogen decline? Why there is no solution for women that experience very early thinning of the skin like dermoporosis? Extreme looseness of the skin (obviously it’s the dermis or tge hyperdermis) even severe muscle loss while only on premenopause? Overthenight I found my boobs flaccid like women after they have breastfed I asked my gyno if there were something to do to restore and get them back to firmness, all I got was an explanation of how sometimes decrease in oestrogen thin tge layer of fat underneath the skin which gives its bouncy look and feel, but its a forever loss. Is it? Excuse my candid question but is there a way to “restore” the breast tissus and why not stop the thinning of other tissue? ������