The Surprising Factor That Lowers Your Ovarian Cancer Risk

 

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What should a woman do to reduce her risk for ovarian cancer?

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TUESDAY, Nov. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) The more children a woman has, the lower her risk of ovarian cancer may be, a new study suggests. The study also found that the risk is lower in women whose fallopian tubes have been tied a procedure called tubal ligation.

Pregnancy and breastfeeding are linked to a lower risk of ovarian cancer. This comes back to how many times you ovulate in your lifetime. “When you’re pregnant, you don’t ovulate,” says Dr. Breastfeeding. Some studies suggest that women who breastfeed for a year or more may have a modestly reduced risk of ovarian cancer.

While these things may help reduce the chance of getting ovarian cancer, they are not recommended for everybody, and risks and benefits are associated with each. Avoiding risk factors may lower your risk, but it does not mean that you will not get cancer. Learn the major risk factors for ovarian cancer and steps you can take to lower your risk. Close As our facilities reopen, we’re employing new safety measures to protect you and our caregivers including universal mask use, temperature testing, social distancing, employee COVID-19 testing, visitor restrictions and keeping our COVID-19.

Women who take birth control pills are less likely to develop ovarian cancer. In fact, staying on a contraceptive pill for at least five years may cut your risk by up to 50 percent, according to the American Cancer Society. Birth control methods that decrease your total number of periods may be especially protective. Ovarian cancer is tricky. It’s hard to spot and spreads faster than any other cancer in the female reproductive system..

You can’t prevent it, but there are things you can do to reduce your. Women who have used oral contraceptives (also known as birth control pills or the pill) have a lower risk of ovarian cancer. The risk is lower the longer the pills are used.

This lower risk continues for many years after the pill is stopped. Other forms of birth control such as tubal ligation (having fallopian tubes tied) and short use of IUDs (intrauterine devices) have also. Research has shown that premenopausal women who have BRCA gene mutations and have had their ovaries removed reduce their risk of breast cancer as well as their risk of ovarian cancer. The risk of ovarian cancer is reduced by 85% to 95%, and the risk of breast cancer cut by 50% or more. Have close family members (such as your mother, sister, aunt, or grandmother) on either your mother’s or your father’s side, who have had ovarian cancer.

Have a genetic mutation (abnormality) called BRCA1 or BRCA2, or one associated with Lynch syndrome. Have had breast, uterine, or colorectal (colon) cancer. “Based on our results, contemporary combined hormonal contraceptives are still associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer in women of reproductive age,” conclude a team led byDr Lisa Iverse.

List of related literature:

Certain ovarian diseases such as granulose-theca cell tumors may increase the risk of uterine cancer via increasing estrogen levels and decreasing progesterone levels.

“Diseases and Disorders” by Marshall Cavendish Corporation
from Diseases and Disorders
by Marshall Cavendish Corporation
Marshall Cavendish, 2007

Women may consider the surgical removal of ovaries and fallopian tubes—it reduces the risk of ovarian cancer by 95% (with a small residual risk of peritoneal carcinoma) and also reduces the risk of breast cancer.

“Genetics and Genomics in Medicine” by Tom Strachan, Judith Goodship, Patrick Chinnery
from Genetics and Genomics in Medicine
by Tom Strachan, Judith Goodship, Patrick Chinnery
CRC Press, 2014

Tubal ligation, hysterectomy, unilateral oophorectomy, and risk of ovarian cancer in the Nurses’ Health Studies.

“Abeloff's Clinical Oncology E-Book” by John E. Niederhuber, James O. Armitage, James H Doroshow, Michael B. Kastan, Joel E. Tepper
from Abeloff’s Clinical Oncology E-Book
by John E. Niederhuber, James O. Armitage, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Cancer therapy in young women (i.e., surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or any combination of these) may result in unavoidable permanent ablation of ovarian function.

“Radiation Oncology E-Book: Rationale, Technique, Results” by James D. Cox, Kie Kian Ang, Steven Jay Frank
from Radiation Oncology E-Book: Rationale, Technique, Results
by James D. Cox, Kie Kian Ang, Steven Jay Frank
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2009

The lifetime risk for ovarian cancer death for the average woman is about 1 percent, so this woman’s lifetime risk is still only 4 percent.

“Overdiagnosed: Making People Sick in the Pursuit of Health” by H. Gilbert Welch, Lisa Schwartz, Steve Woloshin
from Overdiagnosed: Making People Sick in the Pursuit of Health
by H. Gilbert Welch, Lisa Schwartz, Steve Woloshin
Beacon Press, 2011

The female hormones estrogen and progesterone are known to increase the risk of breast and endometrial (uterine) cancers.

“Mosby's Textbook for Nursing Assistants E-Book” by Sheila A. Sorrentino, Leighann Remmert
from Mosby’s Textbook for Nursing Assistants E-Book
by Sheila A. Sorrentino, Leighann Remmert
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

There is, in fact, an inverse correlation between the number of ovulation cycles and the risk of ovarian cancer, i.e. women who have more pregnancies and fewer ovulation cycles have a lower risk of ovarian cancer.

“Obstetrics and Gynecology in Chinese Medicine E-Book” by Giovanni Maciocia
from Obstetrics and Gynecology in Chinese Medicine E-Book
by Giovanni Maciocia
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome increases the risk of breast, ovarian, pancreatic, and prostate cancers, and is associated with up to 54% lifetime risk of ovarian cancer.

“Conn's Current Therapy 2016” by Edward T. Bope, Rick D. Kellerman
from Conn’s Current Therapy 2016
by Edward T. Bope, Rick D. Kellerman
Elsevier, 2015

In 2009, ovarian cancer will be diagnosed in approximately 21,550 American women, and an estimated 14,600 will die of the disease, making it the fifth most common cancer in women and the most common cause of gynecologic cancer mortality.1 Approximately 1 in 70 women will develop ovarian cancer in their lifetime.

“Leibel and Phillips Textbook of Radiation Oncology E-Book: Expert Consult” by Richard Hoppe, Theodore L. Phillips, Mack Roach
from Leibel and Phillips Textbook of Radiation Oncology E-Book: Expert Consult
by Richard Hoppe, Theodore L. Phillips, Mack Roach
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

Menopausal hormone therapy and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer.

“Journal of the National Cancer Institute: JNCI.” by National Cancer Institute (U.S.), National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
from Journal of the National Cancer Institute: JNCI.
by National Cancer Institute (U.S.), National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, 2010

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • How Can Women Reduce Their Risk of Ovarian Cancer?

    Ovarian cancer is considered to be breast cancer’s sister cancer. It’s often considered to be more dangerous than Breast Cancer because it’s not uncommon for ovarian cancer to be detected in it’s late stages.

    But the real question many patients ask is, “What can be done to reduce my risk of developing ovarian cancer?”

    CEO of @Ovarian Cancer National Alliance @Calaneet Balas says that unfortunately, there is not a lot you can do reduce your risk but, there are still a couple of things you can do.

    One surprising way to reduce your ovarian cancer risk is to take birth control. Taking birth control for five years or more can reduce your risk of developing ovarian cancer by up to 50%.

    Watch the video below as CEO Calaneet Balas shares valuable information about how you can reduce your risk of developing ovarian cancer.

    #OvarianCancerActionMonth #OvarianCancer #OvarianCancerRisk