The Potential Outcomes Of Antidepressants and Birth Defects

 

Antidepressants and Birth Defects: Are They Related? New York Attorney Matthew McCauley

Video taken from the channel: Parker Waichman


 

Antidepressants & Young Women

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Antidepressants and Birth Defects

Video taken from the channel: Levin Papantonio


 

CDC finds link between antidepressants, birth defects

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SSRI Antidepressants and Birth Defects: What We Know

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Zoloft & Antidepressant Birth Defects Risk Explained

Video taken from the channel: Lieff Cabraser


 

Specific SSRIs and birth defects: interpreting new data in the context of previous reports

Video taken from the channel: The BMJ


The researchers found no connection between the antidepressants and nine birth defects that previously had been linked to them in earlier studies. However, they did link a higher risk of other five. WEDNESDAY, July 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) New research provides more evidence of a possible link between antidepressant use early in pregnancy and a small increased risk of birth defects. But the. SSRI use was not linked to any other major birth defect. “The bottom line is the risk associated with SSRI use appears to be very small, and this.

For pregnant mothers, if they are already taking an antidepressant linked to birth defects, other antidepressants may not work as effectively. The most common antidepressants are selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or SSRIs. Other serious birth defects linked to SSRI antidepressants include Birth defects linked to these drugs include serious heart defects, spina bifida, omphalocele (intestines or other abdominal organs stick outside the body), club foot, limb reduction deficits, and craniosynostosis (one or more sutures in the skull prematurely fuses). New research provides more evidence of a possible link between antidepressant use early in pregnancy and a small increased risk of birth defects. But the study didn’t prove that the medications cause birth defects, and experts aren’t advising women.

Since September 2005, many studies have shown that antidepressants may cause serious birth defects, including cardiac defects, pulmonary defects, neural-tube defects, abdominal wall defects, club foot syndrome, and anal atresia, to name just a few serious injuries and conditions. Recent research has linked the use of SSRI antidepressants during pregnancy with an increased risk of autism in children. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate: These are Craniofacial birth defects that affect the upper lip (cleft lip) and the roof of the mouth (cleft palate). The defect ranges from a small opening in the upper lip to a large gap that runs into the roof of the mouth and nose. Antidepressants (SSRI) Linked to Birth Defects Antidepressants and Birth Defects In July 2006, the U.S.

Food and Drug Administration (FDA) notified healthcare professionals and consumers of a possible link between antidepressant medications and serious birth defects. The researchers found no connection between the antidepressants and nine birth defects that previously had been linked to them. However, they did link a higher risk of five birth defects to Paxil and two birth defects to Prozac.

The defects include problems with the heart, brain, skull and abdominal wall.

List of related literature:

The three studies that did suggest an association between in utero antidepressant exposure and ASD could also not exclude the influence of maternal mental illness or other factors, including environmental and genetic risks, on their findings (Liu et al. 2017; Rai et al. 2017; Viktorin et al. 2017).

“The American Psychiatric Association Publishing Textbook of Psychiatry, Seventh Edition” by Laura Weiss Roberts, M.D., M.A.
from The American Psychiatric Association Publishing Textbook of Psychiatry, Seventh Edition
by Laura Weiss Roberts, M.D., M.A.
American Psychiatric Association Publishing, 2019

The authors concluded that prenatal SSRI exposure was associated with increased rates of MDD diagnoses in early adolescence; however, confounding due to factors associated with depression and SSRI treatment in pregnancy that differ from those of the women who do not take or discontinue medication is possible.

“Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies E-Book” by Mark B Landon, Henry L Galan, Eric R. M. Jauniaux, Deborah A Driscoll, Vincenzo Berghella, William A Grobman, Sarah J Kilpatrick, Alison G Cahill
from Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies E-Book
by Mark B Landon, Henry L Galan, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2020

no significant differences for birth defects, infant survival, or risk of low birth weight (<2500 g) among singletons between those exposed to any depressant, SSRIs only, and non-SSRIs only, but a shorter gestational duration (<37 weeks) was observed for any antidepressant exposure (OR 1.43; 95% CI 1.14–1.80).

“Drugs in Pregnancy and Lactation: A Reference Guide to Fetal and Neonatal Risk” by Gerald G. Briggs, Roger K. Freeman, Sumner J. Yaffe
from Drugs in Pregnancy and Lactation: A Reference Guide to Fetal and Neonatal Risk
by Gerald G. Briggs, Roger K. Freeman, Sumner J. Yaffe
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2011

Research shows some defects: Research continues into birth defects that may be associated with the class of antidepressants known as selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs).

“Ethics for the Real World: Creating a Personal Code to Guide Decisions in Work and Life” by Ronald Arthur Howard, Clinton D. Korver, Bill Birchard
from Ethics for the Real World: Creating a Personal Code to Guide Decisions in Work and Life
by Ronald Arthur Howard, Clinton D. Korver, Bill Birchard
Harvard Business Press, 2008

One antidepressant, paroxetine, has been found to possibly be linked to birth defects when used in the first trimester of pregnancy as compared with pregnant women taking other antidepressants.

“Principles and Practice of Psychiatric Nursing E-Book” by Gail Wiscarz Stuart
from Principles and Practice of Psychiatric Nursing E-Book
by Gail Wiscarz Stuart
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2014

They calculated that, in absolute terms, if the association between antidepressant treatment and psychiatric disorders in childhood was causal, and mothers in the antidepressant continuation group ceased their antidepressants before pregnancy, 0.5% of psychiatric disorders could be prevented.

“Side Effects of Drugs Annual: A Worldwide Yearly Survey of New Data in Adverse Drug Reactions” by Sidhartha D. Ray
from Side Effects of Drugs Annual: A Worldwide Yearly Survey of New Data in Adverse Drug Reactions
by Sidhartha D. Ray
Elsevier Science, 2018

Although the emphasis of research regarding use of antidepressants in pregnancy has addressed the effect of antidepressant drugs on risk for congenital malformation, more research is needed to assess the long-term effects of prenatal antidepressant exposure.

“Massachusetts General Hospital Handbook of General Hospital Psychiatry E-Book” by Theodore A. Stern, Gregory L. Fricchione, Jerrold F. Rosenbaum
from Massachusetts General Hospital Handbook of General Hospital Psychiatry E-Book
by Theodore A. Stern, Gregory L. Fricchione, Jerrold F. Rosenbaum
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) are widely studied in pregnancy and, with the exception of clomipramine, do not appear to be associated with structural malformations in infants exposed in utero (MacQueen et al., 2016).

“Prenatal and Postnatal Care: A Woman-Centered Approach” by Robin G. Jordan, Cindy L. Farley, Karen Trister Grace
from Prenatal and Postnatal Care: A Woman-Centered Approach
by Robin G. Jordan, Cindy L. Farley, Karen Trister Grace
Wiley, 2018

The research indicated that mothers who took antidepressants during the year before delivery had a . percent greater risk of having children with ASDs, and the greatest increase in risk, . percent, came when the drug was taken during the first trimester.

“The Autistic Brain: Thinking Across the Spectrum” by Temple Grandin, Richard Panek
from The Autistic Brain: Thinking Across the Spectrum
by Temple Grandin, Richard Panek
HMH Books, 2013

The authors found that first trimester exposure to maternal antidepressants was associated with a significantly increased risk of isolated CHC (RR 2.52, 95% CI, [1.47–4.29]).

“Side Effects of Drugs Annual: A worldwide yearly survey of new data in adverse drug reactions” by Sidhartha D. Ray
from Side Effects of Drugs Annual: A worldwide yearly survey of new data in adverse drug reactions
by Sidhartha D. Ray
Elsevier Science, 2015

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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