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Researchers found that working 61 to 70 hours a week increased the risk of coronary heart disease by 42 percent, and working 71 to 80 hours increased it by 63 percent. Researchers found that working 61 to 70 hours a week increased the risk of coronary heart disease by 42 percent, and working 71 to 80 hours increased it by 63 percent. The Health Risks of Long Work Weeks.

MONDAY, Sept. 11, 2017 A 40-hour work week may seem normal to some and like a vacation to others. But a study in the American Journal of Industrial Medicine shows that consistently surpassing this standard can be detrimental to your health. Researchers found that working 61 to 70 hours a week increased the risk of coronary heart disease by 42 percent, and. Working 61 to 70 hours a week increases your risk of coronary heart disease by 42 percent, and working 71 to 80 hours increases it by 63 percent. (For Spectrum Health Beat) A 40-hour work week may seem normal to some and like a vacation to others.

Researchers found that working 61 to 70 hours a week increased the risk of coronary heart disease by 42 percent, and working 71 to 80 hours increased it by 63 percent. A separate study, published in The Lancet, found that people who work long hours have a higher risk of stroke than those working standard hours. All this overtime may not even lead to increased productivity because long hours can actually decrease your efficiency. Researchers found that working 61 to 70 hours a week increased the risk of coronary heart disease by 42 percent, and working 71 to 80 hours increased it by 63 percent.

Long work hours and extended and irregular shifts may lead to fatigue and to physical and mental stress. Working extended shifts may also involve prolonged exposure to potential health hazards such as noise, chemicals, and others. These exposures could exceed established permissible exposure limits (PELs) or violate other health standards. According to U.S.

National Health Interview data from 2010, almost 19% of working adults work 48 hour or more per week and over 7% worked 60 hours or more. Both shift work and long work hours have been associated with health and safety risks. This page provides links to NIOSH publications and other resources that address demanding work schedules. Researchers found that working 61 to 70 hours a week increased the risk of coronary heart disease by 42 percent, and working 71 to 80 hours increased it by 63 percent.

That’s an important finding because heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide, with more than half a million deaths each year in the United States alone, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

List of related literature:

The monotony, job strain, and repetitive musculoskeletal stress of the former occupation will have been replaced by the hazards of casual labour (low wages, no sickness or holiday pay, no job security, long and unsocial hours of work), as will the potential health consequences.

“Social Determinants of Health” by Michael Marmot, Richard Wilkinson
from Social Determinants of Health
by Michael Marmot, Richard Wilkinson
OUP Oxford, 2005

Abnormal work hours can also lead to poor health.

“Encyclopaedia of Occupational Health and Safety” by Jeanne Mager Stellman, International Labour Office
from Encyclopaedia of Occupational Health and Safety
by Jeanne Mager Stellman, International Labour Office
International Labour Office, 1998

Studies have found that working long hours can greatly increase employees’ exposure to the risk of injury or illness.

“Simple Tools and Techniques for Enterprise Risk Management” by Robert J. Chapman
from Simple Tools and Techniques for Enterprise Risk Management
by Robert J. Chapman
Wiley, 2011

Stress and musculoskeletal disorders are the largest causes of work-related ill-health.

“Introduction to Health and Safety in Construction: for the NEBOSH National Certificate in Construction Health and Safety” by Phil Hughes, Ed Ferrett
from Introduction to Health and Safety in Construction: for the NEBOSH National Certificate in Construction Health and Safety
by Phil Hughes, Ed Ferrett
Taylor & Francis, 2015

The reasons that the majority of the office staff gave for going off sick were due to short-term illnesses related to acute and chronic conditions such as high blood pressure, diabetes and severe fatigue.

“Human Resource Management” by Ronan Carbery, Christine Cross
from Human Resource Management
by Ronan Carbery, Christine Cross
Red Globe Press, 2018

The work-related health problems most frequently mentioned were musculoskeletal complaints (30 per cent) and stress (28 per cent).

“Research Companion to Organizational Health Psychology” by Alexander-Stamatios G. Antoniou, Cary L. Cooper
from Research Companion to Organizational Health Psychology
by Alexander-Stamatios G. Antoniou, Cary L. Cooper
Edward Elgar, 2005

Long-term shift work has been associated with cardiovascular, psychiatric, chronic fatigue and gastrointestinal problems (Monk and Folkard, 1992; Smith et al., 2003).

“Safety at the Sharp End: A Guide to Non-technical Skills” by Rhona H. Flin, Paul O'Connor, Margaret Crichton
from Safety at the Sharp End: A Guide to Non-technical Skills
by Rhona H. Flin, Paul O’Connor, Margaret Crichton
Ashgate, 2008

Thirty percent of nonfatal injuries and illnesses requiring days away from work continue to be due to overexertion and repetitive motion (Nicholson, 2011).

“Health Promotion Throughout the Life Span E-Book” by Carole Lium Edelman, Carol Lynn Mandle, Elizabeth C. Kudzma
from Health Promotion Throughout the Life Span E-Book
by Carole Lium Edelman, Carol Lynn Mandle, Elizabeth C. Kudzma
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

That is because constant workplace change, increasing workloads, and growing job pressures have become standard features of working life and therefore health risks in their own right.

“Creating Healthy Organizations: How Vibrant Workplaces Inspire Employees to Achieve Sustainable Success” by Graham S. Lowe
from Creating Healthy Organizations: How Vibrant Workplaces Inspire Employees to Achieve Sustainable Success
by Graham S. Lowe
University of Toronto Press, 2010

Much of the literature to date has focused on the health consequences of shift work and working long hours.

“Handbook of Occupational Health and Wellness” by Robert J. Gatchel, Izabela Z. Schultz
from Handbook of Occupational Health and Wellness
by Robert J. Gatchel, Izabela Z. Schultz
Springer US, 2012

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
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  • Note: The German study showing 78% of cv19 patients show signs of myocarditis has come in for some criticism: see this great analysis by Medlife Crisis: https://youtu.be/iaiQGJqZ6Y8

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  • Beware any kind of exercise. Look up PHYSIOSFORME for advice on Pacing with a heart rate monitor and the physiology and evidence behind that. They have case study videos coming soon. Best of luck x

  • It seems that some of us Long Covids have developed an intolerance of gluten. I went without gluten for two weeks and I was fine. I then tried food containing gluten again and back came the headaches and the stomach pains.

  • Trying to find a career as I’ve just become as junior in high school. I’ve been looking into being an orthopedic surgeon and your channel is a blessing!! Binge watching every single video. Keep it up

  • So interesting to hear those who do not experience fever are more likely to suffer long Covid. What is it that a fever does that might change the way the virus progresses? Is Tim Spector’s team or anyone else researching this aspect yet? Thanks v much for an interesting update and all the best with your recovery.

  • my mom works 66 hours on average per week if she finishes early and maximum is 84 hours per week if there’s an important event coming up soon