The Great Factor About Bacteria in Breast Milk

 

Breastmilk Contaminated With ‘Human Waste’ Bacteria Was Bought Online | Video

Video taken from the channel: LiveScience


 

Breastmilk Sugars Found to Fight Bacteria

Video taken from the channel: Vanderbilt University


 

Study: Pumped breast milk could contain harmful bacteria

Video taken from the channel: WISH-TV


 

How bacteria arrive in breast milk forming the milk microbiome

Video taken from the channel: Better Body Chemistry TV


 

Human breast milk enhances gut microbial diversity

Video taken from the channel: UFHealth


 

Special Report: Breast milk bacteria

Video taken from the channel: WANE 15 News


 

Breastfeeding: good for your baby and their gut bacteria!

Video taken from the channel: IHDCYH Talks Entretiens de l’IDSEA


The investigators found that 30 percent of beneficial bacteria in a baby’s intestinal tract comes directly from the mother’s milk, and 10 percent comes from skin on the mother’s breast. “Breast milk is this amazing liquid that, through millions of years of evolution, has evolved to make babies healthy, particularly their immune systems,” said senior study author Grace Aldrovandi. Breast Milk Is Teeming With Bacteria — That’s Good for the Baby Breast-fed milk may nourish a baby’s microbiome in ways that bottled breast milk can’t. The numbers of bacteria in breast milk are.

The study found that human breast milk inhibits the growth of the harmful bacteria Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis and Clostridium perfringens, but neither cow’s milk or infant formula had. A previous study published in the journal Current Nutrition & Food Science found that breast milk contains substantial amounts of friendly bacteria which helps babies absorb nutrients and develop. Breast milk, it turns out, is teeming with bacteria that colonize the infant’s gut, and could help set the course for the baby’s growing immune system and metabolism.

Researchers at National Jewish Health and the University of Iowa have identified a compound in human breast milk that fights infections by harmful bacteria while allowing beneficial bacteria. As a product which is made within the human body, breast milk was traditionally thought to be sterile. Several recent studies have found that breast milk contains a healthy dose of commensal. Lactobacilli, a bacterium in milk, belongs to the genus Lactobacillus and includes several species, such as L. delbrueckii, L. acidophilus and L.

Also, a milk duct can become clogged due to incomplete breast emptying or excess pressure on the breast. Clogged milk ducts allow bacteria. by Lauren Milligan Newmark in SPLASH! ® milk science update: September 2017 Issue.

A new study reports that 30% of the bacteria in infant’s guts are associated with bacteria in breast milk. Breastfeeding frequency was positively associated with diversity of gut bacterial strains. Beneficial bacteria provided by breast milk may act as seeds in the infant gut, selecting for future.

List of related literature:

These bacteria carry a message down to the baby’s gut, preparing it to create the digestive enzymes that break down breast milk and use it efficiently.

“The Autoimmune Fix: How to Stop the Hidden Autoimmune Damage That Keeps You Sick, Fat, and Tired Before It Turns Into Disease” by Tom O'Bryan, Mark Hyman
from The Autoimmune Fix: How to Stop the Hidden Autoimmune Damage That Keeps You Sick, Fat, and Tired Before It Turns Into Disease
by Tom O’Bryan, Mark Hyman
Potter/Ten Speed/Harmony/Rodale, 2016

Lactating breasts usually increase the volume of milk produced to meet the demand placed on them, however, and the woman’s immune system will be developing antibodies to protect against any bacteria, viruses, or parasites to which she is exposed.

“Breastfeeding and Human Lactation” by Karen Wambach, Becky Spencer
from Breastfeeding and Human Lactation
by Karen Wambach, Becky Spencer
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2019

Mothers also provide living bacteria through breast milk, although it is not clear where these milk bacteria originate.

“The Good Gut: Taking Control of Your Weight, Your Mood, and Your Long-term Health” by Justin Sonnenburg, Erica Sonnenburg, Andrew Weil, M.D.
from The Good Gut: Taking Control of Your Weight, Your Mood, and Your Long-term Health
by Justin Sonnenburg, Erica Sonnenburg, Andrew Weil, M.D.
Penguin Publishing Group, 2015

In addition to the mother’s antibodies, breast milk also contains healthy bacteria and is a probiotic delivery system that builds the infant’s healthy microbiome.

“Eat to Beat Disease: The New Science of How Your Body Can Heal Itself” by William W Li
from Eat to Beat Disease: The New Science of How Your Body Can Heal Itself
by William W Li
Grand Central Publishing, 2019

Breast milk also provides a source of bacteria; there are up to 109 microbial cells per litre of human milk.

“Anatomy and Physiology for Midwives E-Book” by Jane Coad, Kevin Pedley, Melvyn Dunstall
from Anatomy and Physiology for Midwives E-Book
by Jane Coad, Kevin Pedley, Melvyn Dunstall
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Your breast milk feeds the microbes that protect your baby from, well, microbes; infants who aren’t stuffed with B. infantis may suffer more GI problems.

“Microbia: A Journey into the Unseen World Around You” by Eugenia Bone
from Microbia: A Journey into the Unseen World Around You
by Eugenia Bone
Potter/Ten Speed/Harmony/Rodale, 2018

This practice allows the mother to enrich her milk with antibodies against bacteria and viruses to which both she and her baby are exposed.

“Breastfeeding Management for the Clinician” by Marsha Walker
from Breastfeeding Management for the Clinician
by Marsha Walker
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2016

The maternal antibodies in colostrum and breast milk inactivate harmful bacteria within the infant’s digestive tract before they can start infections.114 Immune factors in breast milk interfere with the growth of bacteria that could otherwise attack the infant’s vulnerable digestive tract linings.

“Nutrition: Concepts and Controversies, MyPlate Update” by Frances Sizer, Ellie Whitney
from Nutrition: Concepts and Controversies, MyPlate Update
by Frances Sizer, Ellie Whitney
Cengage Learning, 2011

In addition to antibodies, colostrum and breast milk provide other powerful agents (+) that help to fight against bacterial infection.

“Nutrition for Health and Health Care” by Ellie Whitney, Linda Kelly DeBruyne, Kathryn Pinna, Sharon Rady Rolfes
from Nutrition for Health and Health Care
by Ellie Whitney, Linda Kelly DeBruyne, et. al.
Cengage Learning, 2010

Live bacteria are present in breast milk, including Streptococcus, Lactobacillus, and Bifidobacterium.

“Food Microbiology: Fundamentals and Frontiers” by Michael P. Doyle, Francisco Diez-Gonzalez, Colin Hill
from Food Microbiology: Fundamentals and Frontiers
by Michael P. Doyle, Francisco Diez-Gonzalez, Colin Hill
Wiley, 2020

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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