The Center and Oestrogen

 

Dr. Eleanor Kennedy on Estrogen and Heart Disease

Video taken from the channel: CHI St. Vincent


 

How Does Estrogen Affect The Heart?

Video taken from the channel: EmpowHER


 

Mayo Clinic Minute: Women, estrogen and heart disease

Video taken from the channel: Mayo Clinic


 

Mayo Clinic Minute: The estrogen and blood pressure connection

Video taken from the channel: Mayo Clinic


 

Taking Estrogen After Menopause: What You and Your Heart Need to Know

Video taken from the channel: Banner Health


 

What We Know About Estrogen and Cardiovascular Health

Video taken from the channel: MenopauseSociety


 

Hormones and the Heart

Video taken from the channel: AHAScienceNews


Estrogen has a plethora of effects in the cardiovascular system. Studies of estrogen and the heart span human clinical trials and basic cell and molecular investigations. Greater understanding of cell and molecular responses to estrogens can provide further insights into the findings of clinical studies. Starting to take estrogen after a few years doesn’t reverse that, and it widens blood vessels, increasing blood flow to the heart.

What does all this mean to you? If you are under the age of 60 or within 10 years of entering menopause (when you haven’t had a period for 12 consecutive months), then talk to your doctor about whether the health benefits of HRT/ERT outweigh any. Estrogen and the female heart. Estrogen has a plethora of effects in the cardiovascular system. Studies of estrogen and the heart span human clinical trials and basic cell and molecular investigations.

Greater understanding of cell and molecular responses to estrogens can provide further insights into the findings of clinical stu. The Heart and Estrogen/ Progestin Replacement Study (HERS) Synopsis: A secondary prevention trial with daily, continuous combined estrogen-progestin treatment reports no reduction in myocardial infarctions or coronary deaths. The hers trial was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial supported by Wyeth-Ayerst for $40. Because of a hormonal problem, the body has too much blood glucose, and too much blood glucose can cause type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular problems — like high cholesterol, high blood pressure and heart disease.

Major Cardiometabolic Risk Factors for Heart Disease. High blood glucose is only one of the big risk factors for cardiovascular problems. To help lower your risk of heart disease after menopause, your doctor may prescribe estrogen-based hormone therapy. Estrogen supplementation can lower your risk of heart disease as well as protect against osteoporosis— a bone loss that increases with age—especially after menopause.

The Heart and Estrogen/progestin Replacement Study (HERS) was a randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled secondary prevention trial of estrogen plus progestin for secondary prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD) in postmenopausal women. Before menopause, women have a lower risk of heart disease than men do. But as women age, and their estrogen levels decline after menopause, their risk of heart disease increases. In the 1980s and 1990s, experts advised older women to take estrogen and. Heart Health: Estrogen helps protect against heart disease.

The hormone does a lot of good things in your body to help keep your blood vessels healthy, including decreasing inflammation and controlling your cholesterol levels. Glycemic effects of postmenopausal hormone therapy: the Heart and Estrogen/progestin Replacement Study. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

Kanaya AM(1), Herrington D, Vittinghoff E, Lin F, Grady D, Bittner V, Cauley JA, Barrett-Connor E; Heart and Estrogen/progestin Replacement Study.

List of related literature:

of estrogen receptor (ER) in some tissues (bone, liver, and the cardiovascular system), inhibitors in other tissues (brain and breast), and mixed activator/inhibitors in the uterus.

“Medical Phisiology: Principles for Clinical Medicine” by Rodney A. Rhoades, David R. Bell
from Medical Phisiology: Principles for Clinical Medicine
by Rodney A. Rhoades, David R. Bell
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2012

It follows that estrogen protects us against heart attack and stroke, as both are dependent on atherosclerosis of the vessels (hardening of the arteries) to occur.

“The Secret Female Hormone: How Testosterone Replacement Can Change Your Life” by Kathy C. Maupin, M.D.
from The Secret Female Hormone: How Testosterone Replacement Can Change Your Life
by Kathy C. Maupin, M.D.
Hay House, 2014

Heart and Estrogen/

“Principles of Gender-specific Medicine” by Marianne J. Legato, John P. Bilezikian
from Principles of Gender-specific Medicine
by Marianne J. Legato, John P. Bilezikian
Elsevier Academic Press, 2004

It acts as an estrogen receptor agonist in certain tissues (e.g., bone, uterus) but as an estrogen antagonist at other tissues (e.g., breast).

“USMLE Step 1 Secrets E-Book” by Thomas A. Brown, Sonali J Bracken
from USMLE Step 1 Secrets E-Book
by Thomas A. Brown, Sonali J Bracken
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

There are sites for estrogen activity in the cardiovascular system, liver, immune system, bone, kidney, lung, and thymus.

“Encyclopedia of Women and Gender, Two-Volume Set: Sex Similarities and Differences and the Impact of Society on Gender” by Judith Worell
from Encyclopedia of Women and Gender, Two-Volume Set: Sex Similarities and Differences and the Impact of Society on Gender
by Judith Worell
Elsevier Science, 2001

Estrogens and androgens are normally produced from cholesterol through a series of chemical conversions involving the hypothalamus, anterior pituitary, adrenal glands, and ovaries in females and testes in males.

“Clinical Drug Therapy for Canadian Practice” by Kathleen Marion Brophy, Heather Scarlett-Ferguson, Karen S. Webber, Anne Collins Abrams, Carol Barnett Lammon
from Clinical Drug Therapy for Canadian Practice
by Kathleen Marion Brophy, Heather Scarlett-Ferguson, et. al.
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2010

There are estrogen receptors in the skin, the brain, the heart, the bones, the genitourinary tract, and the intestines.

“Invitation to Holistic Health: A Guide to Living a Balanced Life” by Charlotte Eliopoulos, American Holistic Nurses' Association
from Invitation to Holistic Health: A Guide to Living a Balanced Life
by Charlotte Eliopoulos, American Holistic Nurses’ Association
Jones and Bartlett, 2004

Estrogen works in concert with progesterone to nourish and support the growth and regeneration of the female reproductive tissues—the breasts, ovaries, and uterus—so the body will create eggs.

“A New Way to Age: The Most Cutting-Edge Advances in Antiaging” by Suzanne Somers
from A New Way to Age: The Most Cutting-Edge Advances in Antiaging
by Suzanne Somers
Gallery Books, 2020

Estrogen receptors (ERs) have been demonstrated in female sex organs, breast, pituitary, liver, bone, blood vessels, heart, CNS and in certain hormone responsive breast carcinoma cells.

“Essentials of Medical Pharmacology” by KD Tripathi
from Essentials of Medical Pharmacology
by KD Tripathi
Jaypee Brothers,Medical Publishers Pvt. Limited, 2018

Estrogen protects the heart and blood vessels.

“Population and Society: An Introduction to Demography” by Dudley L. Poston, Jr., Leon F. Bouvier
from Population and Society: An Introduction to Demography
by Dudley L. Poston, Jr., Leon F. Bouvier
Cambridge University Press, 2010

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • I have too much Estrogen…and it caused my blood pressure to go up..:( But the Progesterone lowered it…Sooo I guess it can go both ways?:)