Teens Who Eat Plenty of Fruit May Lower Their Cancer Of The Breast Risk

 

Your Healthy Family: Can diet impact breast cancer risk?

Video taken from the channel: KOAA 5


 

Will Eating Vegetables and Fruits Lower My Cancer Risk?

Video taken from the channel: Breast Cancer Answers®


 

Healthwatch: Fruit May Help Lower Breast Cancer Risk

Video taken from the channel: CBS Miami


 

To reduce future risk of breast cancer, teen girls should eat more fruits, vegetables

Video taken from the channel: LOCAL 12


 

Teens Who Eat Fruit Have Lower Risks For Breast Cancer

Video taken from the channel: b/60


 

Could eating fruit help prevent breast cancer?

Video taken from the channel: CBSN


 

Eating More Fruit When You’re Young Could Lower Breast Cancer Risk

Video taken from the channel: Newsy


In the fruit study, consumption of apples, bananas and grapes during adolescence was strongly associated with a drop in breast cancer risk. Roughly. By Alan Mozes HealthDay Reporter.

WEDNESDAY, May 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) Teenage girls who consume large amounts of fruit may lower their future risk for breast cancer, a new study suggests.. Conversely, women who drink more alcohol over time might increase their breast cancer risk, although they could also lower their chances of heart disease, a second report found. In the fruit study, consumption of apples, bananas and grapes during adolescence was strongly associated with a drop in breast cancer risk. Roughly three daily servings of such fruits was linked to a 25 percent drop in risk by middle age, compared with consuming just a half-serving per day.

WEDNESDAY, May 11, 2016 Teenage girls who consume large amounts of fruit may lower their future risk for breast cancer, a new study suggests. A new study reveals that teens who eat 3 servings of fruit a day have a 25% decreased risk of breast cancer as an adult, compared to teens who eat less than one serving of fruit a day. The researchers found that more fruit consumption (2.9 servings versus 0.5 servings) during adolescence was linked to a 25 percent lower risk of breast cancer.

Interestingly, it was a greater consumption of apples, bananas, and grapes during adolescence (as well as oranges and kale during early adulthood) that was linked to a lower breast cancer risk. In the fruit study, consumption of apples, bananas and grapes during adolescence was strongly associated with a drop in breast cancer risk. Roughly.

Teenage girls who consume large amounts of fruit may lower their future risk for breast cancer, a new study suggests. Conversely, women who drink more alcohol over time might increase their breast cancer risk, although they could also lower their chances of heart disease, a second report found. Certain fruits seemed to confer the biggest protection against breast cancer — apples, bananas and grapes were associated with the greatest reduction in risk while kale and oranges in adulthood.

Certain fruits seemed to confer the biggest protection against breast cancer—apples, bananas and grapes were associated with the greatest reduction in risk while kale and oranges in adulthood also.

List of related literature:

There is no evidence linking fat intake and breast cancer, but consuming high levels of fruit and vegetables may lower the risk of breast cancer.

“Physical Examination and Health Assessment E-Book” by Carolyn Jarvis
from Physical Examination and Health Assessment E-Book
by Carolyn Jarvis
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

This study found a no significant protective role of fruit to breast cancer.

“Recent Advances in Environmental Science from the Euro-Mediterranean and Surrounding Regions: Proceedings of Euro-Mediterranean Conference for Environmental Integration (EMCEI-1), Tunisia 2017” by Amjad Kallel, Mohamed Ksibi, Hamed Ben Dhia, Nabil Khélifi
from Recent Advances in Environmental Science from the Euro-Mediterranean and Surrounding Regions: Proceedings of Euro-Mediterranean Conference for Environmental Integration (EMCEI-1), Tunisia 2017
by Amjad Kallel, Mohamed Ksibi, et. al.
Springer International Publishing, 2017

Those who consumed an average of 205 mg/day of vitamin C from foods had a 63% lower risk of breast cancer than those who consumed an average of 70 mg/day.

“Herbs and Natural Supplements, Volume 2: An Evidence-Based Guide” by Lesley Braun, Marc Cohen
from Herbs and Natural Supplements, Volume 2: An Evidence-Based Guide
by Lesley Braun, Marc Cohen
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

Neither type of study showed that fruit had a protective effect against breast cancer.

“Nutritional Oncology” by David Heber, George L. Blackburn, Vay Liang W. Go, John Milner
from Nutritional Oncology
by David Heber, George L. Blackburn, et. al.
Elsevier Science, 2011

A 63 percent lower risk of breast cancer was found in premenopausal women with an average intake of 205mg of vitamin C per day compared with similar women who consumed an average of 70mg each day.[35] These subjects had a family history of breast cancer.

“Vitamin C: the Real Story: The Remarkable and Controversial Healing Factor: Easyread Super Large 20pt Edition” by Steve Hickey
from Vitamin C: the Real Story: The Remarkable and Controversial Healing Factor: Easyread Super Large 20pt Edition
by Steve Hickey
CREATESPACE PUB, 2009

A study of women with a history of breast cancer concluded that a diet with increased vegetable and fruit intake was linked with a significantly reduced risk of cancer recurrence [127].

“Studies in Natural Products Chemistry” by Atta-urRahman
from Studies in Natural Products Chemistry
by Atta-urRahman
Elsevier Science, 2013

Several epidemiologic studies have examined the association between vegetable and fruit intake and risk for primary breast cancer.

“Principles of Gender-specific Medicine” by Marianne J. Legato, John P. Bilezikian
from Principles of Gender-specific Medicine
by Marianne J. Legato, John P. Bilezikian
Elsevier Academic Press, 2004

Hence, the results suggested that a modest reduction in fat intake and increase in fruit, vegetable, and grain intake do not alter the risk of benign proliferative breast disease.

“A Guide to Evidence-based Integrative and Complementary Medicine” by Vicki Kotsirilos, Luis Vitetta, Avni Sali
from A Guide to Evidence-based Integrative and Complementary Medicine
by Vicki Kotsirilos, Luis Vitetta, Avni Sali
Elsevier Health Sciences APAC, 2011

However, in one study, overweight women with an average vitamin C intake of 110 mg each day were found to have a 39 percent lower risk of breast cancer compared to similar women with an intake of 31 mg a day.34 The Nurses’ Health Study also suggests an association between low levels of vitamin C and breast cancer.

“Vitamin C: The Real Story: the Remarkable and Controversial Healing Factor” by Steve Hickey, Andrew W. Saul
from Vitamin C: The Real Story: the Remarkable and Controversial Healing Factor
by Steve Hickey, Andrew W. Saul
Basic Health Publications, 2008

“Specific to BRCA1 and BRCA2, a 2009 study featured in the journal Breast Cancer Research and Treatment demonstrated that women with the inherited mutation who ate more fruits and vegetables significantly reduced their risk of developing cancer compared to the women with the mutation who ate fewer fruits and

“Goddesses Never Age: The Secret Prescription for Radiance, Vitality, and Well-Being” by Christiane Northrup, M.D.
from Goddesses Never Age: The Secret Prescription for Radiance, Vitality, and Well-Being
by Christiane Northrup, M.D.
Hay House, 2015

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

View all posts

1 comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  • Will Eating Fruits & Vegetables Lower My Cancer Risk?

    All our life we’ve heard, “Make sure to eat your greens.” Maybe you’ve even heard, “An apple a day keeps the doctor away.” But how does the consumption of fruits and vegetables affect our cancer risk?

    This is a question 21st Century Oncology’s Dr. Brian Lawenda has been asked often. According to Dr. Lawenda, for the longest time doctors have been telling patients that eating fruits and vegetables can lower your cancer risk that this is true. But is this still true today?

    Dr. Lawenda talks about a recent, larger metaanalysis studies that tackles how fruits and vegetables really affect our cancer risk.

    #BreastCancer   #Cancer   #CancerRisk