Take care of Caregivers

 

Self-Care and Managing Expectations for Parents and Caregivers

Video taken from the channel: UCLACART


 

Caring for the Caregivers: 3 Tools for Self-Care | Cristol Barrett O’Loughlin | TEDxLuxembourgCity

Video taken from the channel: TEDx Talks


 

Care for caregivers: Being a caregiver to someone with breast cancer | CNA Lifestyle

Video taken from the channel: CNA


 

Care for Caregivers

Video taken from the channel: Electronic Caregiver


 

Caring for YOU, the Caregiver

Video taken from the channel: havethattalk


 

Self-Care as a Caregiver: Protecting Yourself from Burnout

Video taken from the channel: Psych Hub Education


 

Caring for the caregivers | Frances Lewis | TEDxSnoIsleLibraries

Video taken from the channel: TEDx Talks


If you’re an “at home” Caregiver, Professional Caregiver or you operate a community that cares for individuals with Alzheimer’s dementia, this web site and all of the information and services it provides are here for you. There are over 15 Million unpaid caregivers at home providing care to loved ones with Alzheimer’s and sadly 30% of those “at home” caregivers will pre-decease the people they are caring for. Most in-home caregivers help seniors with their daily tasks while keeping them company.

In general, they can help them get around the house safely, prepare meals, clean the house and give medication reminders. Most caregivers can also help with taking seniors to doctor appointments and running errands if. About Care For CareGivers This site is a place to help support the people that support us. Designed specifically for professional caregivers, this website represents a partnership between the Canadian Mental Health Association in BC and Safecare BC, and is proudly supported the BC Ministry of Mental Health and Addictions. A caregiver is anyone who provides help to another person in need, such as an ill spouse or partner, a disabled child, or an aging relative.

However, family members who are actively caring for an older adult often don’t self-identify as a “caregiver.” Recognizing this role can help caregivers receive the support they need. Here are some of the common tasks caregivers do: Buy groceries, cook, clean house, do laundry, provide transportation Help the care receiver get dressed, take a shower, take medicine Transfer someone out of bed/chair, help with physical therapy, perform medical interventions—injections, feeding tubes, wound treatment, breathing treatments. Caregivers should stay home and monitor their health for COVID-19 symptoms while caring for the person who is sick.

Symptoms include fever, cough, and shortness of breath but other symptoms may be present as well. Trouble breathing is a more serious warning sign that you need medical attention. A caregiver helps a person with special medical needs in performing daily activities. Tasks include shopping for food and cooking, cleaning the house, and giving medicine.

Many government programs allow family members of veterans and people with disabilities to get paid for caring for them. About 53 million Americans provide care without pay to an ailing or aging loved one, and they do so for an average of nearly 24 hours per week, according to the “Caregiving in the U.S. 2020” report by AARP and the National Alliance for Caregiving (NAC). That unpaid commitment can make it hard for caregivers to make ends meet. Adult Day Health Care Centers (ADHC) ADHC Centers are a safe and active environment with constant supervision designed for Veterans to get out of the home and participate in activities.

It is a time for the Veteran you care for to socialize with other Veterans while you, the Family Caregiver, get some time for yourself. Caring for a loved one with a chronic illness is one of the most difficult tasks a family caregiver can master. If you add that to the demands of child care and a job, it becomes even more of a challenge.

List of related literature:

Caregivers may include spouses, partners, family members, friends, hired attendants, and other health care workers such as nurses and nurse’s aides.

“Occupational Therapy with Elders E-Book: Strategies for the Occupational Therapy Assistant” by Helene Lohman, Rene Padilla, Sue Byers-Connon
from Occupational Therapy with Elders E-Book: Strategies for the Occupational Therapy Assistant
by Helene Lohman, Rene Padilla, Sue Byers-Connon
Elsevier Health Sciences, 1920

Most home visits focus on helping the patient and caregiver achieve independence with care in the home, including home care by therapists, home infusion teaching by nurses, and care management, instead of providing direct physical care.

“Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book” by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Lisa Keenan-Lindsay, David Wilson, Cheryl A. Sams
from Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book
by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

Most home visits now focus on helping the patient and caregiver achieve independence with care in the home, including home care by therapists, home infusion teaching by nurses, and care management, rather than direct provision of physical care.

“Wong's Nursing Care of Infants and Children Multimedia Enhanced Version” by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson, Donna L. Wong, Annette Baker, R.N., Patrick Barrera, Debbie Fraser Askin
from Wong’s Nursing Care of Infants and Children Multimedia Enhanced Version
by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson, et. al.
Mosby/Elsevier, 2013

In addition to providing a protective and therapeutic environment for those needing care, the day care centers offer family caregivers respite from the burden of caregiving and allow employed caregivers to continue to work and care for their loved ones at home.

“Encyclopedia of Social Work” by Harry L. Lurie, National Association of Social Workers
from Encyclopedia of Social Work
by Harry L. Lurie, National Association of Social Workers
National Association of Social Workers, 1965

Typically the home care nurse can assess the degree of involvement of family-unit caregiver roles in such areas as financial contribution, housekeeping, childcare, child socialization, recreation, kinship (maintaining contact with family members), and therapeutic administration (meeting family member affective needs).

“Home Care Nursing Practice: Concepts and Application” by Robyn Rice
from Home Care Nursing Practice: Concepts and Application
by Robyn Rice
Mosby Elsevier, 2006

The home care nurse may need to assist patients of multiple age groups to learn selfcare and assist caregivers to support patients’ efforts or actively participate in diabetes management.

“Clinical Drug Therapy for Canadian Practice” by Kathleen Marion Brophy, Heather Scarlett-Ferguson, Karen S. Webber, Anne Collins Abrams, Carol Barnett Lammon
from Clinical Drug Therapy for Canadian Practice
by Kathleen Marion Brophy, Heather Scarlett-Ferguson, et. al.
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2010

Most caregivers are involved in coordinating health and allied health care and taking people with IDD to and from appointments.

“Health Care for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities across the Lifespan” by I. Leslie Rubin, Joav Merrick, Donald E. Greydanus, Dilip R. Patel
from Health Care for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities across the Lifespan
by I. Leslie Rubin, Joav Merrick, et. al.
Springer International Publishing, 2016

Caregivers are individuals who provide home-based, uncompensated care including assistance with activities of daily living (e.g., eating, bathing, dressing) and the performance of medical and nursing tasks (e.g., administering medication, changing bandages).

“Abeloff's Clinical Oncology E-Book” by John E. Niederhuber, James O. Armitage, James H Doroshow, Michael B. Kastan, Joel E. Tepper
from Abeloff’s Clinical Oncology E-Book
by John E. Niederhuber, James O. Armitage, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

First, there is direct caring for the person, which includes physical care (e.g., feeding, bathing, grooming), emotional care (e.g., listening, talking, offering reassurance), and services to help people meet their physical and emotional needs (e.g., shopping for food, driving to appointments, going on outings).

“Forced to Care: Coercion and Caregiving in America” by Evelyn Nakano Glenn
from Forced to Care: Coercion and Caregiving in America
by Evelyn Nakano Glenn
Harvard University Press, 2010

Home Care • Assess the client and caregiver at every visit for the quality of their relationship, and for the quality and safety of the care provided.

“Mosby's Guide to Nursing Diagnosis E-Book” by Gail B. Ladwig, Betty J. Ackley, Mary Beth Makic
from Mosby’s Guide to Nursing Diagnosis E-Book
by Gail B. Ladwig, Betty J. Ackley, Mary Beth Makic
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • Being a willing caregiver to my wife, ( of 48 years) diagnosed with AD i feel that after 6 months I am becoming a Jekyll and Hyde having to live in two different worlds in real time. Now I am at the stage of exhaustion and losing interest in trying to slow the progression. Being totally exhausted each day, and having to plan for the tomorrows, along with producing meals, and still running our business, my main worry is that I will not be around to give her the love and care she needs as she progresses.

  • Anger, resentment, and frustration are conditions of caregiving. It doesn’t mean we don’t love those to whom we provide care; we have to recognize that these emotions are perfectly normal. Dedicating time to ourselves helps mitigate these feelings.

  • What about the daughter…the caregiver to their parent. What about, that, plus the fact the other 2 siblings abandoned her.
    Why is there a focus on a spouse as caregiver.
    I felt so alone and isolated, nobody understands how hard it was.

  • Caregiving kills the caregiver way to early. Its absolutely not right for a married couple taking care of wifes grandmother because other family is nonexistent. It’s not right to give up your house, life and putting marriage on hold to move in with grandma who can still physically do things but is used to things always being done by grandpa who passed. I feel so alone and worried about wifes wellbeing. We live to serve grandma and no longer live for us anymore. I’m tired of the people who get to live their own life in their own house say you’re doing a good thing and it will be alright. It’s a sentence to servitude and absolutely wears you down mentally and financially. I’m working to keep her retirement lifestyle going by using our future retirement. Just so sad for our life and what it has become.

  • Every emergency response system has a “BUTTON.”  Don’t be fooled by old technology that leaves you stranded when you need help in an emergency. The ECG Alert System provides a comprehensive monitoring system that protects the user by advanced technology that help the users even if they can’t press a “BUTTON.”

    If you would like to learn how to protect yourself or a loved one from the consequences of poor planning, contact Shane Ownbey at 801.554.4142. He is the area rep for Eastern Washington, but would assist you regardless of where you are in the USA! http://www.electroniccaregiver.com 

  • 30 yrs old and took care of both my grandparents alone until they both passed last year. Dad has had ALZ 5 years. I gave up opportunities and relationships. I loved them dearly and do not regret it, but i feel very lost and lonely. Lost all my friends in the process. I feel old.

  • for others who believe that a care giver should swallow there feelings,to me that’s just an easy way to distance them selves from your reality un till its becomes there turn.,,,,,