Swaddling May Increase Chance of SIDS

 

Study: Swaddling babies may increase the risk of SIDS

Video taken from the channel: AltaViewHospital


 

Study links swaddling to heightened risk of SIDS

Video taken from the channel: WOOD TV8


 

New study says swaddling babies increases risk of SIDS

Video taken from the channel: WIVBTV


 

The Facts About SIDS and Swaddling

Video taken from the channel: Healthcare Triage


 

Swaddling May Increase Risk Of SIDS

Video taken from the channel: CBS Boston


 

Swaddling your baby may increase SIDS risk, new study says

Video taken from the channel: WRTV Indianapolis


 

Swaddling your baby may increase SIDS risk, new study says

Video taken from the channel: TMJ4 News


While the overall SIDS risk was increased with swaddling, the risk was even greater when swaddled babies were placed on their stomachs to sleep, Moon said. Those infants, compared to those not. The Findings Overall, the analysis showed an increased risk of SIDS when babies were swaddled for “all babies put together,” said co-author Dr. Rachel Y. Moon, division head of general pediatrics at the University of Virginia School of Medicine.

There was a slight increase in risk when infants were swaddled and placed on their backs, Moon said. Researchers pooled data from four observational studies of SIDS and swaddling that included 760 SIDS cases and 1,759 controls. Over all, swaddling increased the risk for SIDS by about one-third. New research finds the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) appears to increase when infants are swaddled while sleeping on their stomachs or sides.

The risk is low when they’re swaddled and. While the overall SIDS risk was increased with swaddling, the risk was even greater when swaddled babies were placed on their stomachs to sleep, Moon said. Those infants, compared to those not swaddled, had about 13 times the risk of dying from SIDS, also known as sudden infant death syndrome, she said. While the overall SIDS risk was increased with swaddling, the risk was even greater when swaddled babies were placed on their stomachs to sleep, Moon said.

Those infants, compared to those not swaddled, had about 13 times the risk of dying from SIDS, also known as sudden infant death syndrome, she said. As indicated above, prone swaddled infants are at greatly increased risk for SIDS 8. Particularly relevant here, is that two published studies found that swaddling actually reduces SIDS risk when infants sleep in the supine position 8, 10. However, the potential dangers of swaddling infants should not be entirely dismissed. Despite these unsurprising conclusions, media outlets seized upon the finding that swaddled babies placed on their back also have an increased risk of SIDS and that swaddled babies over 6 months. Swaddling as a risk seemed to vary according to sleep position and older age.

The significant risk of placing infants on their side or prone to sleep doubled when infants were swaddled, and the SIDS risk associated with swaddling increased with age. Overall, the analysis showed an increased risk of SIDS when babies were swaddled for “all babies put together,” said co-author Dr. Rachel Y. Moon, division head of.

List of related literature:

Among 12 incidents involving swaddling in blankets that resulted in death (median age at death 2 months), 58% of deaths were attributed to positional asphyxia related to prone sleeping, and 92% involved additional risk factors, most commonly soft bedding.

“Smith's Recognizable Patterns of Human Deformation” by John M. Graham, Jr. MD, ScD, Pedro A. Sanchez-Lara, MD. MSCE
from Smith’s Recognizable Patterns of Human Deformation
by John M. Graham, Jr. MD, ScD, Pedro A. Sanchez-Lara, MD. MSCE
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

EB: Swaddling increases the risk of SIDS twofold in infants 6 months or younger (Pease et al, 2016).

“Nursing Diagnosis Handbook E-Book: An Evidence-Based Guide to Planning Care” by Betty J. Ackley, Gail B. Ladwig, Mary Beth Makic, Marina Martinez-Kratz, Melody Zanotti
from Nursing Diagnosis Handbook E-Book: An Evidence-Based Guide to Planning Care
by Betty J. Ackley, Gail B. Ladwig, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Another risk factor for SIDS is the covering of the infant’s head by bedding.

“Midwifery: Preparation for Practice” by Sally Pairman, Sally K. Tracy, Carol Thorogood, Jan Pincombe
from Midwifery: Preparation for Practice
by Sally Pairman, Sally K. Tracy, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

Although the incidence of prone sleep position is currently 20 percent or less, 30–50 percent of infants with SIDS are still found in the prone position [Hauck and Tanabe, 2008; Mitchell et al., 2008].

“Swaiman's Pediatric Neurology E-Book: Principles and Practice” by Kenneth F. Swaiman, Stephen Ashwal, Donna M Ferriero, Nina F Schor
from Swaiman’s Pediatric Neurology E-Book: Principles and Practice
by Kenneth F. Swaiman, Stephen Ashwal, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

Risk for SIDS has been found to be increased after illness among prone sleepers, those who were heavily wrapped, and those whose heads were covered during sleep.

“Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics E-Book” by Robert M. Kliegman, Bonita F. Stanton, Joseph St. Geme, Nina F Schor, Richard E. Behrman
from Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics E-Book
by Robert M. Kliegman, Bonita F. Stanton, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

Before 1992 there was mounting epidemiologic evidence from around the world that infants placed in the prone sleeping position were at increased risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).30-39 Other potential risk factors were soft bedding, swaddling, and recent respiratory or gastrointestinal illnesses.

“Evidence-Based Public Health” by and Director of the Prevention Research Center Ross C. Brownson Professor of Epidemiology, Elizabeth A. Baker Associate Professor of Behavioral Science and Health Education, Terry L. Leet Assistant Professor of Epidemiology, Missouri Kathleen N. Gillespie Associate Professor of Health Management and Policy All at St.Louis University School of Public Health
from Evidence-Based Public Health
by and Director of the Prevention Research Center Ross C. Brownson Professor of Epidemiology, Elizabeth A. Baker Associate Professor of Behavioral Science and Health Education, et. al.
Oxford University Press, USA, 2002

• Expand the national campaign to reduce the risks of SIDS to include a major focus on the safe sleep environment and ways to reduce the risks of all sleep-related infant deaths, including SIDS, suffocation, and other accidental deaths.

“Encyclopedia of the Neurological Sciences” by Robert B. Daroff, Michael J. Aminoff
from Encyclopedia of the Neurological Sciences
by Robert B. Daroff, Michael J. Aminoff
Elsevier Science, 2014

Mitchell EA, Thach BT, Thompson JMD, Williams S, for the New Zealand Cot Death Study: Changing infants’ sleep position increases risk of sudden infant death syndrome.

“Pediatric Respiratory Medicine E-Book” by Lynn M. Taussig, Louis I. Landau
from Pediatric Respiratory Medicine E-Book
by Lynn M. Taussig, Louis I. Landau
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2008

Swaddling and putting a baby down to sleep in a prone position increases the risk of SIDS.

“Counseling the Nursing Mother” by Judith Lauwers, Anna Swisher
from Counseling the Nursing Mother
by Judith Lauwers, Anna Swisher
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2015

Swaddling is associated with a small but significant risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) when infants are placed on their backs for sleep, and swaddled infants placed prone have the highest risk of SIDS.

“Merenstein & Gardner's Handbook of Neonatal Intensive Care E-Book: An Interprofessional Approach” by Sandra Lee Gardner, Brian S. Carter, Mary I Enzman-Hines, Susan Niermeyer
from Merenstein & Gardner’s Handbook of Neonatal Intensive Care E-Book: An Interprofessional Approach
by Sandra Lee Gardner, Brian S. Carter, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2020

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

View all posts

2 comments

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  • While in his swaddled, my son rolled over for the first time and when I went to check on him, he was face down and suffocating. As I lifted him up he gasped for air and I fell to my knees and didn’t stop crying for hours. Please don’t swaddle if you can’t constantly watch your baby. I was very very lucky. I’ll actually call it a miracle because I had a nagging feeling to check on him although he was not fussing. My son is 3 yrs old and the very light of my life.

  • We swaddled both my girls as babies but only while they were REALLY small, two months or younger. Once they were older they didnt like it. Iris has always been able to self soothe and sleep on her back while sucking a pacifier. Ashlynn didnt like pacifiers and needed to be rocked to sleep on her belly but would be laid down on her back. So far, at 6 years for one and 7 months for thw other, were doing well!