‘Superbug’ MRSA Infections Aren’t Shedding in youngsters CDC

 

New CDC data on The Importance of Staph Aureus & MRSA

Video taken from the channel: Health Watch USA


 

Fighting Super Bugs: Overcoming Antibiotic Resistance

Video taken from the channel: University of California Television (UCTV)


 

Doctors: MRSA Infections Common In Kids

Video taken from the channel: WLKY News Louisville


 

Science Bulletins: MRSA—The Evolution of a Drug-Resistant Superbug

Video taken from the channel: American Museum of Natural History


 

Superbug, MRSA, Part 2: Kids

Video taken from the channel: CHItvHealth


 

MRSA Bacteremia and CDI LabID Event Reporting with Case Studies (Part I)

Video taken from the channel: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


 

Superbugs: CDC’s 2013 List of the Biggest Drug-Resistant Threats

Video taken from the channel: Paul Cochrane


MONDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) Although rates of infection with methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are declining among American adults, the rates among children. MONDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) Although rates of infection with methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus ( MRSA) are declining among American adults, the rates among children remain largely unchanged, a new government study finds.

In addition, MRSA disproportionately affects infants less than 3 months old and black children, according to the report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control. To better identify how this super bug is affecting infants and children, Iwamoto and her colleagues reviewed reports of MRSA infections across the United States from 2005 to 2010.

‘Superbug’ MRSA infections aren’t dropping in children: CDC (HealthDay)—Although rates of infection with methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. ‘Superbug’ MRSA Infections Aren’t Dropping in Children: CDC. While overall rates still low for kids, study finds infants and black children face higher risk. Please note: This article was published more than one year ago. The facts and conclusions presented may have since changed and may no longer be accurate.

‘Superbug’ MRSA infections aren’t dropping in children: CDC 23 September 2013, by Serena Gordon, Healthday Reporter While overall rates still low for kids, study finds infants. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) identifies the following superbugs as two of the top threats to the U.S.: Clostridium Difficile (C. diff) According to the Mayo Clinic, “Each year, more than a half million people get sick from C. difficile, and in recent years, C. difficile infections have become more frequent, severe, and difficult to treat.”.

MRSA, a staph infection, is on the rise among children, often sending them to the hospital. WebMD explains how children catch MRSA and which symptoms to look for. But in the late 1990s, a second type of MRSA infection was identified, mostly among children and adults who had no existing medical conditions.

A MRSA infection is. The CDC figure only includes deaths in hospitals, ignoring deaths among folks like my dad who might die from MRSA or another superbug infection at their homes or in a senior facility.

List of related literature:

Reports on MRSA bacteraemia in the UK indicate the problem is increasing among children less than 15 years of age (Khairulddin et al 2004).

“Practices in Children's Nursing E-Book” by Ethel Trigg, Toby Mohammed, Louise Ford, Hermione Montgomery, Vicky Vidler
from Practices in Children’s Nursing E-Book
by Ethel Trigg, Toby Mohammed, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

The same group performed a prevalence study in 240 children attending a day-care center, using nasopharyngeal swabs.”)

“Bacterial Infections of Humans: Epidemiology and Control” by Alfred S. Evans, Philip S. Brachman
from Bacterial Infections of Humans: Epidemiology and Control
by Alfred S. Evans, Philip S. Brachman
Springer US, 2013

A few infants become infected by direct extension from the sites of colonization (e.g., otitis media from nasopharyngeal colonization).

“Infectious Diseases of the Fetus and Newborn E-Book” by Jack S. Remington, Christopher B. Wilson, Victor Nizet, Jerome O. Klein, Yvonne Maldonado
from Infectious Diseases of the Fetus and Newborn E-Book
by Jack S. Remington, Christopher B. Wilson, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

In the last decade, the drug resistant superbug MRSA has become a major cause of a highly infectious disease around the world, leading to alarming increases in patient fatalities and healthcare costs [33].

“Handbook of Proteolytic Enzymes” by Alan J. Barrett, Neil D. Rawlings, J. Fred Woessner
from Handbook of Proteolytic Enzymes
by Alan J. Barrett, Neil D. Rawlings, J. Fred Woessner
Elsevier Science, 2012

CDC estimates that as many as 80,000 hospital patients are infected with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) each year in the United States.

“Microbial Threats to Health: Emergence, Detection, and Response” by Institute of Medicine, Board on Global Health, Committee on Emerging Microbial Threats to Health in the 21st Century, Joshua Lederberg, Margaret A. Hamburg, Mark S. Smolinski
from Microbial Threats to Health: Emergence, Detection, and Response
by Institute of Medicine, Board on Global Health, et. al.
National Academies Press, 2003

Within several years, though, methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates were described as well.

“Modern Infectious Disease Epidemiology: Concepts, Methods, Mathematical Models, and Public Health” by Alexander Krämer, Mirjam Kretzschmar, Klaus Krickeberg
from Modern Infectious Disease Epidemiology: Concepts, Methods, Mathematical Models, and Public Health
by Alexander Krämer, Mirjam Kretzschmar, Klaus Krickeberg
Springer New York, 2010

Outbreaks of MRSA infections have occurred in pediatric residential care facilities as well.

“Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control” by C. Glen Mayhall
from Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control
by C. Glen Mayhall
Wolters Kluwer Health, 2012

Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in hospitalized adults and children without known risk factors.

“Principles and Practice of Pediatric Infectious Diseases E-Book” by Sarah S. Long, Larry K. Pickering, Charles G. Prober
from Principles and Practice of Pediatric Infectious Diseases E-Book
by Sarah S. Long, Larry K. Pickering, Charles G. Prober
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

An outbreak of disease in South African children in 1978 as a result of penicillin-resistant pneumococci signaled that S. pneumoniae would henceforth require routine susceptibility testing by microbiology laboratories.

“Pediatric Respiratory Medicine E-Book” by Lynn M. Taussig, Louis I. Landau
from Pediatric Respiratory Medicine E-Book
by Lynn M. Taussig, Louis I. Landau
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2008

Changes in the epidemiology of nosocomial infections and outbreaks of MRSA (Boyce et al. 2005), ampicillin-resistant E. coli, vancomycin-resistant enterococci and multiresistant Gram-negative bacilli are increasingly being reported from neonatal units.

“Rennie & Roberton's Textbook of Neonatology E-Book” by Janet M. Rennie
from Rennie & Roberton’s Textbook of Neonatology E-Book
by Janet M. Rennie
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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7 comments

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  • I cannot believe the 1% is still getting away with pumping antibiotics into all mass produced livestock as this clip says ->a drug resistant microbe started as a new NON drug resistant mutation in humans, was passed to livestock where it became drug resistant then got passed back into humans

  • The U.S. Center for Disease Control needs a Dept. of Bacteriophage Research which connects with experienced Russians (Tiblisi, Georgia). The correct bacteriophage can KILL ANY BACTERIA KNOWN TO MAN! And the Russians used these medicines effectively while fighting Germans in WW2, defeating many infections while the Germans only had sulfa drugs.

  • Ebola virus! He said that anybody, somebody saw on electronic microscope. Nobody saw any virus, stupid dr!
    Liar! Medical Dr are Liar, parasites.
    Health Care is #1 killer.

  • Well colloidal silver cures superbugs because bacteria eat antibiotics for lunch not silver. The best brand is sovereign because it’s the smallest particle size and purest form of the silver 99.999% and pharmaceutical grade water when talking purity. Don’t be scared people they scare you and give you no option making u feel less empowered when the power to heal is ours and yours.

  • Thats some badass music to go along with some badass bugs! Great job, great info graphics…..we will help direct people and clinicians to this sight….211 views?? Our general public knowledge of these potentially apocalyptic organisms, is scant at best. I guess its not an apocalypse until it is….its a shame if we have to wait until bodies are piling up in the streets…..

  • What we need is a virus which is genetically modified to hunt the decease causing bacteria. Currently there are regulatory issues and problems with the way treatments are tested for human use but some companies have moved offshore to get around these issues. One of these facilities may have a cure or be working on one already.

  • Praise the HOLY LORD, FORGIVE THO NOT SHALT FOLLOW CHIRISTANTIY FAITH, THIS IS NOT A BACTERIAL INFECTION INFACT IT IS THE DEVILsigning off from Pope Francis 17th