Study Supports Annual Mammograms Beginning at 40

 

Health Alert: Mammograms: 40 or 50?

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Should Women Get Mammograms Starting at Age 40?

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Study adds support to mammograms starting at age 40 November 30, 2011 / 3:23 PM / WebMD In the latest findings to fuel the debate on when to start getting mammograms, new research adds support to. Otis Brawley, chief medical officer of the American Cancer Society, supports the mammography recommendations of his organization: starting at 45 instead of 40, unless 40 is preferred, and converting to every-other-year mammograms at age 55. “For a woman who is 40 years old of average risk, the chances that a mammogram is going to be important in her health over the. Guidelines differ, but a new study estimates thousands of U.S. lives could be saved if mammograms were done every year from age 40 to 84. “Screening annually starting at age 40 is the best strategy to avert an early breast cancer death,” said study co-author R. Edward Hendrick, a radiology professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. Guidelines differ, but a new study estimates thousands of U.S. lives could be saved if mammograms were done every year from age 40 to 84. “Screening annually starting at age 40 is the best strategy to avert an early breast cancer death,” said study co-author R. Edward Hendrick, a radiology professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

Between 1990 and 1997, more than 160,000 women aged 39 to 41 were randomly selected to receive either an annual mammogram or to wait until the age of 50 to begin such screening, as U.K. government. The American Cancer Society and the National Cancer Institute both continue to recommend annual screening beginning at age 40, however, leading to confusion among doctors and patients, Destounis. Trump tells rally: “This is not a crowd of a person who comes in second place” 4 Houston police officers fired after fatal shooting; Deadly wildfires level homes and decimate communities. Breastcancer.org stands by its recommendation that all women have mammograms annually starting at age 40, and the results of this study strongly support that recommendation.

We also believe that monthly breast self-exam and annual physical exams by a doctor are essential parts of an overall breast cancer screening strategy. Photo: Shutterstock UPI.com Adding to an ongoing debate over the timing of mammography, a new British study finds that screening women aged 40 to 49 for breast cancer saves lives, with only small increases in overdiagnosis. “This is a very long-term follow-up of a study which confirms that screening in women under 50 can save lives,” researcher Stephen Duffy, from. For many years, the American Cancer Society (ACS) recommended annual mammograms starting at age 40, but in October 2015, they issued new recommendations that moved in the direction of those of the medical experts.

List of related literature:

In Australia, women aged 70 years and older are also offered free screening mammogram every 2 years (Cancer Council Australia, Position statement, 2009).

“Jarvis's Physical Examination and Health Assessment E-Book” by Helen Forbes, Elizabeth Watt
from Jarvis’s Physical Examination and Health Assessment E-Book
by Helen Forbes, Elizabeth Watt
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

Advocates of mammography for women aged forty to forty-nine, including many politicians and radiologists, defended screening by arguing that it reduced mortality from breast cancer by 16 to 18 percent, at least half as much as did screening older women.

“The Breast Cancer Wars: Hope, Fear, and the Pursuit of a Cure in Twentieth-Century America” by Barron H. Lerner
from The Breast Cancer Wars: Hope, Fear, and the Pursuit of a Cure in Twentieth-Century America
by Barron H. Lerner
Oxford University Press, 2001

[Both groups recommended mammography for women aged 50–74 years (USPSTF B recommendation), but USPSTF concluded the current evidence was insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening mammography in women 75 years and older (I statement).]

“Essential Epidemiology: An Introduction for Students and Health Professionals” by Penny Webb, Chris Bain, Andrew Page
from Essential Epidemiology: An Introduction for Students and Health Professionals
by Penny Webb, Chris Bain, Andrew Page
Cambridge University Press, 2017

Recommendations for mammograms and CBE every other year are made up to age 85 by the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) [80].

“Principles of Gender-specific Medicine” by Marianne J. Legato, John P. Bilezikian
from Principles of Gender-specific Medicine
by Marianne J. Legato, John P. Bilezikian
Elsevier Academic Press, 2004

Most, but not all, studies indicate a mortality benefit for women undergoing mammography at ages 40 to 49 years, but the delay in observed benefit in women younger than age 50 years makes it difficult to determine the incremental benefit of beginning screening at age 40 years rather than at age 50 years.

“Swanson's Family Medicine Review E-Book” by Alfred F. Tallia, Joseph E. Scherger, Nancy Dickey
from Swanson’s Family Medicine Review E-Book
by Alfred F. Tallia, Joseph E. Scherger, Nancy Dickey
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

Clinical breast exams and monthly breast self-exams are recommended for women younger than age 40 and should supplement mammograms for women older than age 40.

“New Dimensions in Women's Health” by Linda Lewis Alexander, Judith H. LaRosa, Helaine Bader, Susan Garfield
from New Dimensions in Women’s Health
by Linda Lewis Alexander, Judith H. LaRosa, et. al.
Jones & Bartlett Learning, LLC, 2009

It also states that current evidence is insufficient to assess the benefits and harms of screening mammography in older women (aged 75 and older).

“Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2020 E-Book: 5 Books in 1” by Fred F. Ferri
from Ferri’s Clinical Advisor 2020 E-Book: 5 Books in 1
by Fred F. Ferri
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

While there is general agreement that screening mammography reduces mortality from breast cancer in women over 50 years of age, there has been considerable debate over the effectiveness of screening mammography for women aged 40–49 [7].

“Management of Breast Diseases” by Ismail Jatoi, Manfred Kaufmann
from Management of Breast Diseases
by Ismail Jatoi, Manfred Kaufmann
Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2010

Since older, postmenopausal women are the highest-risk group for breast cancer, that means that about 80—83 percent of the high-risk population of women do not get mammograms on a regu— larly scheduled basis.

“Screaming to be Heard: Hormonal Connections Women Suspect... and Doctors Still Ignore” by D. Lee D. Vliet
from Screaming to be Heard: Hormonal Connections Women Suspect… and Doctors Still Ignore
by D. Lee D. Vliet
M. Evans, 2005

Thus, in their 2009 revision, the USPSTF raised the age at which they recommended initiating mammographic screening from 40 to 50 and revised their recommendations to include screening mammograms only every 2 years for women between the ages of 50 and 74 years of age.

“Current Surgical Therapy E-Book” by John L. Cameron, Andrew M. Cameron
from Current Surgical Therapy E-Book
by John L. Cameron, Andrew M. Cameron
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • My Doctors warning me that I have do a mamogram annually, because I have a high potential
    probability to have in the future… I would prefer not to do it…

  • My wife’s last mammogram was a few years ago.  They saw something on one breast, but they were unable to get a clean result so what did they do?  They did SIX more “shots” of that breast in an attempt to see the result they were looking for!  When my wife told me this, I was furious!  She felted pressure to allow them to continue performing the procedure over and over again even though it was hurting her.  Her breast was very sore for better than a month!   My wife is still on the fence about getting mammograms for fear of cancer.  Luckily she continues to say NO.

  • My recent 3-D diagnostic mammogram is costing me after insurance $500, and the biopsy is near $3000. And I don’t have cancer! All the fear and money involved is sickening.

  • Let me see if I have this right: The harm that mammograms do is when someone is diagnosed with cancer when she actually doesn’t have cancer, right?

  • I am a woman with fibrous lumps. I have had CT scan, three biopsies, and a lump removed. All to find out no, yet again, I do NOT have cancer. I now refuse mammograms. When my doctor got pushy about them, I changed doctors to one who understands my plight. When I adopted a plant based diet I made the decision that if I found out I had cancer, I wouldn’t do anything differently. I would just use food to heal me! So why should I put myself through all that?

  • They tell you 80 percent of the time, biopsies are negative to make us less worried. But then I thought about it. 80 percent of the time the results of a mammogram are wrong?? That’s crazy! What other test is that inaccurate?

  • Stop all cancers by getting your kidneys to filter your lymphatic systems cellular waste. It took me 4 months of dry fasting, herbs and fruit only diet but after 47 years my kidneys are filtering for the first time that I can remember. Absolutely amazing, follow Dr Robert Morse Videos on YT.

  • Dr G, maybe you can do some more in-depth videos on colonoscopies too (I know you had the one video)…seems to be the same issue with mammographies and colonoscopies….($$)

  • This indirectly explains something else I’ve noticed, as well. I remember reading an article, over ten years ago, about a new procedure for detecting breast cancer. It was supposed to be far less invasive, and more accurate. It involved testing saliva samples. All any female patient would’ve needed to do was to spit into a cup. No disrobing required. This method would’ve been preferable, by far. I guess that probably got nixed, for the sake of mammography machine companies too. Figures! I was wondering whatever happened to that idea. ����

  • They tried mess with my mom about that. They chose to ignore the fact that they didn’t see any cancer in the mammograms, yet wanted to remove her breast anyway. The only reason she went was because she used to have a big ball in her breast for many years then it just disappeared, after diet Changes.