Strategies for Speaking to Your Medical Provider

 

Speak Up: Tips for Talking to Your Doctor

Video taken from the channel: WACommunityHealth


 

How to Talk to Your Doctor About Depression

Video taken from the channel: Everyday Health


 

Dr Grant Blashki Tips for talking to your GP about anxiety and depression

Video taken from the channel: Beyond Blue Official


 

Webinar: Tips for talking with your doctor

Video taken from the channel: kidneyfund


 

Tips for Talking to Healthcare Providers About Older Adults

Video taken from the channel: Signe Gleeson


 

Tips for talking to your doctor Macmillan Cancer Support

Video taken from the channel: Macmillan Cancer Support


 

Talking With Your Doctor and Other Health Care Providers

Video taken from the channel: ICHPUF


Write down your goals for the visit and the things you most want to talk about with your provider, and bring it to your appointment. Try to keep your list to the 2-3 most important items. Also, create and maintain a personal health record. Write down all your past and current health problems, and any surgery or other treatments you’ve had. Only use the providers’ e-mail address for legitimate health reasons.

Don’t forward jokes, add to mass mailing lists, or use it for personal reasons. Don’t try to substitute e-mail consultations for in-office consultations. You still need to see your health care professional face-to-face.

Taking Control of Your Mental Health: Tips for Talking With Your Health Care Provider 1. Don’t know where to start for help? Talk to your primary care provider.. If you’re going to your primary care 2. Prepare ahead of your visit.. Health care providers have a limited amount of time for each.

1) Talk to your primary care provider Your mental health is part of your overall health. When you visit your doctor, they may ask you a lot of questions, but not about your mental health. Speak up! Tell them what you are experiencing. Your primary care provider will be able to direct you to mental health specialist.

2) Prepare for your visit. Regular asthma checkups help keep your asthma under control. This 2-page fact sheet offers tips for working closely with your health care provider and sample questions to ask at your next appointment.

4 Tips: Start Talking With Your Health Care Providers About Complementary Health Approaches. When patients tell their providers about their use of complementary health practices, they can better stay in control and more effectively manage their health. When providers ask their patients, they can ensure that they are fully informed and can help patients make wise health care decisions. Effective communication with your healthcare provider is paramount to getting healthy and staying healthy.

In addition to the positive ben-efits to overall health, finding a provider you can communicate with aids in improving the quality of your healthcare decisions by enabling you to make the most informed decisions necessary for proper treatment. Talk to Your Patients About Physical Activity. Start the conversation.

As a health care provider, you know it’s important to help your patients get more physical activity. But it can be challenging to motivate patients in the short time you spend together. Here are a few tips that can help you talk to your doctor and make the most of your appointment: Write down a list of questions and concerns before your appointment. Consider bringing a close friend or family member with you. Take notes about what the doctor says, or ask a friend or family member to take notes for you.

Be your own advocate. Try to call from a quiet, distraction-free place so you can focus on your conversation and communicate clearly. Remember, you are your own advocate when dealing with your health insurance company, so it’s important to do a little research on your own about your question or concern.

List of related literature:

Open questions ask the client to talk about what is important to him or her, whereas closed questions ask the client to talk about what is important to the health care provider.

“Integrative Medicine E-Book” by David Rakel
from Integrative Medicine E-Book
by David Rakel
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

Perhaps the provider will need to ask the patient to bring an advocate (spouse/family member/friend) to listen, take notes, and/or ask questions.

“Health Communication for Health Care Professionals: An Applied Approach” by Dr. Michael P. Pagano, PhD, PA-C
from Health Communication for Health Care Professionals: An Applied Approach
by Dr. Michael P. Pagano, PhD, PA-C
Springer Publishing Company, 2016

• Patient should discuss with their health care providers about the complementary health approach they are considering and ask any questions they may have.

“Sleep Disorders Medicine: Basic Science, Technical Considerations and Clinical Aspects” by Sudhansu Chokroverty
from Sleep Disorders Medicine: Basic Science, Technical Considerations and Clinical Aspects
by Sudhansu Chokroverty
Springer New York, 2017

Here are some tips for interacting with third-party representatives: • Before calling provider services, have all documents readily accessible to discuss the patient account.

“Kinn's Medical Assisting Fundamentals E-Book: Administrative and Clinical Competencies with Anatomy & Physiology” by Brigitte Niedzwiecki, Julie Pepper, P. Ann Weaver
from Kinn’s Medical Assisting Fundamentals E-Book: Administrative and Clinical Competencies with Anatomy & Physiology
by Brigitte Niedzwiecki, Julie Pepper, P. Ann Weaver
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

She should ask questions about what care is needed and the frequency of visits.

“Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women's Health Nursing” by Sharon Smith Murray, MSN, RN, C, Emily Slone McKinney, MSN, RN, C
from Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women’s Health Nursing
by Sharon Smith Murray, MSN, RN, C, Emily Slone McKinney, MSN, RN, C
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2013

Some providers will prompt the patient with a gentle command, “Tell me what you heard and what you plan to do,” to assemble all the essential facts of the discussion.

“Communication Skills for the Health Care Professional: Concepts and Techniques” by Gwen Marram Van Servellen
from Communication Skills for the Health Care Professional: Concepts and Techniques
by Gwen Marram Van Servellen
Aspen Publishers, 1997

Strategies to improve your communication with health care providers include addressing the colleague by name, having the patient and chart available when discussing patient issues, focusing on the patient problem, and being professional and assertive but not aggressive or confrontational.

“Fundamentals of Nursing E-Book” by Patricia A. Potter, Anne Griffin Perry, Patricia Stockert, Amy Hall
from Fundamentals of Nursing E-Book
by Patricia A. Potter, Anne Griffin Perry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

• Give the care provider receiving the referral as much information as possible about the patient.

“Fundamentals of Nursing E-Book” by Patricia A. Potter, Anne Griffin Perry, Patricia Stockert, Amy Hall
from Fundamentals of Nursing E-Book
by Patricia A. Potter, Anne Griffin Perry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2020

Health care professionals use the Internet and Skype to communicate with patients.

“Maternal Child Nursing Care E-Book” by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, Kathryn Rhodes Alden, Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Mary Catherine Cashion, David Wilson
from Maternal Child Nursing Care E-Book
by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

Ask open ended questions, not “Do you have any questions” or Negotiate next steps with the patient in regards to when they may be ready to talk about treatments or prognosis.

“Neuropalliative Care: A Guide to Improving the Lives of Patients and Families Affected by Neurologic Disease” by Claire J. Creutzfeldt, Benzi M. Kluger, Robert G. Holloway
from Neuropalliative Care: A Guide to Improving the Lives of Patients and Families Affected by Neurologic Disease
by Claire J. Creutzfeldt, Benzi M. Kluger, Robert G. Holloway
Springer International Publishing, 2018

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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