Strategies for Keeping The Children Safe When Travelling to School

 

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Map out safe routes to school with your children before they head out on their own. Kids should hold a grown-up’s hand when they cross the street or are in parking lots. Always cross the street at a corner or at a crosswalk and obey traffic signals; cross with a crossing guard if there is one. Walk on a sidewalk. Pedestrian Safety Tips.

Make sure your child has a safe route before allowing him or her to walk to school. Always cross at a crosswalk. Avoid dashing out between cars. Do not cross the street alone if you are younger than 10 years old.

Stop at the curb before crossing the street. Walk, don’t run, across the street. Look LEFT, RIGHT and LEFT again before crossing. Keep these tips in mind when walking with your child to and from school: When crossing streets, hold your child’s hand and always observe the traffic safety laws. Observe all traffic signals and let the school crossing guard help you.

Be sure to look all ways before crossing the street, and continue to watch for vehicles. Get our top tips for walking safety for children. One of the most effective ways to prepare children is to start young and practice through real experience, like walking to school, the park or the playground. Children who develop road awareness in primary school are in a much better position when they make the transition to secondary school. Here are some tips to make sure your child safely travels to school: Walkers » Review your family’s walking safety rules and practice walking to school with your child.

Walk on the sidewalk, if one is available; when on a street with no sidewalk, walk facing the traffic. Ask your child’s school if they’ve prepared any videos, factsheets or letters for children about changes to expect. These might explain changes to the school and what children need to do differently – like signs for walking around buildings, where to keep belongings and changes in using the toilet. Virtual learning, in-person instruction, or somewhere in between – it’s likely you or your child will be a pedestrian at some point in the day.

Remind them to: Use the sidewalk whenever possible, and if there isn’t a sidewalk, walk on the edge of the street facing traffic. Five Tips to Keep Your Children Safe on Their Way to and from School Strengthen your traffic safety knowledge: Teach and reinforce your children’s pedestrian safety habits. A Kid’s Guide to Safe Walking (PDF, 3.04 MB) This colorful pamphlet will help you teach young children safety tips for crossing the street and things to remember when walking. Tips for Preteens & Teens: Prevent Pedestrian Crashes.

If a child is walking or biking to school, make sure that they know and obey all of the traffic laws. Walkers should use a sidewalk, when available, cross in crosswalks, and never push or shove or play near the road. Bikers should always wear a well-fitted helmet.

Refer to Placement of Equipment and Furnishings from Caring for Our Children from the National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education (CFOC) for additional information. Create centers or zones for specific purposes, like reading, science, cozy areas, and floor play, away from areas designated for active play.

List of related literature:

Teach the child pedestrian safety: “Stop, Look, Listen” at crosswalks; use sidewalks; wear light-colored clothing at night.!

“Foundations of Nursing E-Book” by Kim Cooper, Kelly Gosnell
from Foundations of Nursing E-Book
by Kim Cooper, Kelly Gosnell
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

Teach name, address, and phone number and emphasize that child should ask for help from appropriate people (e.g., cashier, security guard, police) if lost; have identification on child (e.g., sewn in clothes, inside shoe).

“Wong's Nursing Care of Infants and Children E-Book” by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson
from Wong’s Nursing Care of Infants and Children E-Book
by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

Make sure that children wear an item of bright clothing and carry a whistle that they know to blow if they are frightened or lost.

“Medicine for the Outdoors E-Book: The Essential Guide to Emergency Medical Procedures and First Aid” by Paul S. Auerbach
from Medicine for the Outdoors E-Book: The Essential Guide to Emergency Medical Procedures and First Aid
by Paul S. Auerbach
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2009

Encourage parents to establish set routines with their children, provide safety checklists, know their children’s friends, monitor the use of technology, and keep open the lines of communication so children feel free to raise their concerns and feelings about staying alone.

“The Elementary / Middle School Counselor's Survival Guide” by John J. Schmidt, Ed.D.
from The Elementary / Middle School Counselor’s Survival Guide
by John J. Schmidt, Ed.D.
Wiley, 2010

Teach children to walk in the opposite direction of traffic when walking alone.

“Child Protection: The Essential Guide for Teachers and Other Professionals whose Work Involves Children” by Freda Briggs
from Child Protection: The Essential Guide for Teachers and Other Professionals whose Work Involves Children
by Freda Briggs
JoJo Publishing, 2018

• Teach preschoolers to stay away from street and to cross the street only when holding the hand of an adult to prevent pedestrian injury.

“Maternity and Pediatric Nursing” by Susan Scott Ricci, Terri Kyle
from Maternity and Pediatric Nursing
by Susan Scott Ricci, Terri Kyle
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2009

Obey safety rules when walking during the day or at night.

“Encyclopedia of Special Education: A Reference for the Education of Children, Adolescents, and Adults with Disabilities and Other Exceptional Individuals” by Cecil R. Reynolds, Elaine Fletcher-Janzen
from Encyclopedia of Special Education: A Reference for the Education of Children, Adolescents, and Adults with Disabilities and Other Exceptional Individuals
by Cecil R. Reynolds, Elaine Fletcher-Janzen
Wiley, 2007

Again, working with the school authorities and using appropriate research reviewed protocols, you might be able to send questions home with children, identify children as they arrive at or leave school as walkers and bikers, and then do a phone, online, or in-person survey with their parents.

“Essentials of Public Health Communication” by Claudia Parvanta, David E. Nelson, Sarah A. Parvanta, Richard N. Harner
from Essentials of Public Health Communication
by Claudia Parvanta, David E. Nelson, et. al.
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2010

Teach children what areas are safe in and around the house.

“Introduction to Maternity and Pediatric Nursing E-Book” by Gloria Leifer
from Introduction to Maternity and Pediatric Nursing E-Book
by Gloria Leifer
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

Teach the child his or her name, address, and phone number and to ask for help from appropriate people (cashier, security guard, police) if lost; have identification on child (sewn in clothes, inside shoe).

“Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book” by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Lisa Keenan-Lindsay, David Wilson, Cheryl A. Sams
from Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book
by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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