Stopping and Dealing with Gynecologic Cancer

 

Knowledge is Power: Gynecologic Cancer Symptoms

Video taken from the channel: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


 

Gynecologic Cancer: Risks, Screenings, and Treatment

Video taken from the channel: BayCare


 

Gynecologic Cancer Awareness: Mayo Clinic Radio

Video taken from the channel: Mayo Clinic


 

Overview of Gynecologic Cancers

Video taken from the channel: University of California Television (UCTV)


 

Gynecologic Cancer Prevention, Screening and Treatment

Video taken from the channel: NYU Langone Health


 

Gynecologic Cancer Prevention, Screening and Treatment

Video taken from the channel: NYU Langone Health


 

Gynecologic Cancer Prevention

Video taken from the channel: University of California Television (UCTV)


Here are a few coping tips to consider: First, recognize that these feelings are perfectly normal. Also recognize that now, more than during any other time in Try to reframe your diagnosis in a positive manner. Use it as a reason to find a new meaning and focus in life. One Bottom line: turn. Some gynecologic cancers are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), a very common sexually transmitted infection.

The HPV vaccine protects against the types of HPV that most often cause cervical, vaginal, and vulvar cancers. HPV vaccination is recommended for preteens aged 11 to 12 years, but can be given starting at age 9. Cancer is a disease in which cells in the body grow out of control. When cancer starts in a woman’s reproductive organs, it is called gynecologic cancer.

The five main types of gynecologic cancer are: cervical, ovarian, uterine, vaginal, and vulvar. (A sixth type of gynecologic cancer is the very rare fallopian tube cancer.). It is estimated that this year 98,000 women will be diagnosed with a gynecologic cancer and some 30,000 will die from the disease. Gynecological Cancer Awareness Month provides an important opportunity to draw attention to this important women’s health issue and offer vital information on risk cancers, warning signs, and prevention strategies.

The Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group conducts and fosters the development of research on the prevention and early detection of breast cancer, cervix and human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers, endometrial cancers, ovarian cancers, and precursor conditions related to these cancers.. Read more About the Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group. different types of gynecologic cancer. These are. cancers that affect the female reproductive organs.

They include cervical, ovarian, uterine, vaginal, and vulvar cancers. You will find information on: • Signs, symptoms, and risk factors related to each gynecologic cancer. • What you can do to help prevent gynecologic cancer. Gynecological cancer has many psychological effects on women’s health. For example, treatment interventions for gynecological cancer have negative impacts on patients’ body images, sexuality, fertility and family, and professional and social lives, and can reduce the overall quality of life (Pinar, Algier, Colak, & Ayhan, 2008). A diagnosis of cancer can be psychologically and emotionally.

Surviving gynecologic cancer and coping with sexual morbidity: an international problem. it is clear that they cannot prevent the majority of the significant sexual problems, as 50 years of retrospective data and 10 years of prospective data from around the world demonstrate. Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Month is recognized each year in September and is a perfect time to encourage women to learn more about cancers of the cervix, vagina, vulva, ovaries, and uterus including early detection and prevention. Every year in the United States, about 89,000 women are diagnosed with and more than 29,000 die from a gynecologic cancer.

REGISTER NOW Description. Connect with others in our free, 15-week online support group for people diagnosed with a gynecologic and/or reproductive cancer who are currently receiving treatment. In this group led by an oncology social worker, members can share their personal experiences, ways of coping and helpful resources..

Our group: Reduces feelings of loneliness, anxiety and distress.

List of related literature:

Your chance of recovery (prognosis) and choice of treatment depend on the stage of your cancer (whether it is just in the endometrium or has spread to other parts of the uterus or other parts of the body) and your general state of health.

“Consumer Health USA” by Alan M. Rees
from Consumer Health USA
by Alan M. Rees
Oryx Press, 1997

Patients with locally advanced or recurrent gynecologic malignant tumors have relatively few treatment options.

“Clinical Radiation Oncology E-Book” by Leonard L. Gunderson, Joel E. Tepper
from Clinical Radiation Oncology E-Book
by Leonard L. Gunderson, Joel E. Tepper
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

It has been demonstrated that many patients with stage IB2 or IIA cervical cancer, treated with radical hysterectomy, will go on to require adjuvant radiation and chemotherapy, based on either high-risk factors or on a combination of intermediate risk factors.

“Perry's The Chemotherapy Source Book” by Michael Clinton Perry, Donald C. Doll, Carl E. Freter
from Perry’s The Chemotherapy Source Book
by Michael Clinton Perry, Donald C. Doll, Carl E. Freter
Wolters Kluwer Health, 2012

Treatment options depend on the nature of the cancer, stage of pregnancy and most importantly the mother’s wishes.

“Joints and Connective Tissues: General Practice: The Integrative Approach Series” by Kerryn Phelps, Craig Hassed
from Joints and Connective Tissues: General Practice: The Integrative Approach Series
by Kerryn Phelps, Craig Hassed
Elsevier Health Sciences APAC, 2012

A phase II study of multimodality treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer: neoadjuvant carboplatin and paclitaxel followed by radical hysterectomy and adjuvant cisplatin chemoradiation.

“The Chemotherapy Source Book” by Michael Clinton Perry
from The Chemotherapy Source Book
by Michael Clinton Perry
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2008

Refer the patient and partner to agencies or support groups, many of which can be found on the Internet through respected cancer organizations or government sites.

“Clinical Companion for Medical-Surgical Nursing E-Book: Patient-Centered Collaborative Care” by Donna D. Ignatavicius, M. Linda Workman, Chris Winkelman
from Clinical Companion for Medical-Surgical Nursing E-Book: Patient-Centered Collaborative Care
by Donna D. Ignatavicius, M. Linda Workman, Chris Winkelman
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

The second approach advocates similar surgical therapy, but to decrease and prevent metastases and recurrences, radiotherapy is administered to the abdominal lymph nodes on the ipsilateral side while the remaining ovary is shielded.

“Blaustein's Pathology of the Female Genital Tract” by Robert J. Kurman
from Blaustein’s Pathology of the Female Genital Tract
by Robert J. Kurman
Springer New York, 2013

Treatment options for a woman with stage IA cervical cancer may include cervical conization, total hysterectomy, radical hysterectomy, or intracavitary radiation therapy.

“The Johns Hopkins Manual of Gynecology and Obstetrics” by The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, K. Joseph Hurt, Matthew W. Guile, Jessica L. Bienstock, Harold E. Fox, Edward E. Wallach
from The Johns Hopkins Manual of Gynecology and Obstetrics
by The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, K. Joseph Hurt, et. al.
Wolters Kluwer Health, 2012

However, treatment for atypical hyperplasia or invasive disease usually includes surgical intervention, such as curettage for carcinoma in situ, total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and lymphadenectomy.141 Chemotherapy and radiation also may be used.

“Pathophysiology: The Biologic Basis for Disease in Adults and Children” by Kathryn L. McCance, RN, PhD, Sue E. Huether, RN, PhD
from Pathophysiology: The Biologic Basis for Disease in Adults and Children
by Kathryn L. McCance, RN, PhD, Sue E. Huether, RN, PhD
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2014

Whole abdominal radiotherapy in the adjuvant treatment of patients with stage III and IV endometrial cancer: a gynecologic oncology group study.

“Abeloff's Clinical Oncology E-Book” by John E. Niederhuber, James O. Armitage, James H Doroshow, Michael B. Kastan, Joel E. Tepper
from Abeloff’s Clinical Oncology E-Book
by John E. Niederhuber, James O. Armitage, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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