Speaking with Your Medical Provider

 

#4.4 Tips for You and Your Healthcare Provider to Follow: Patient/Doctor Communication (4 of 4)

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Talking with Your Health Care Provider

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Patient Safety Series: Talking With Your Health Care Team

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How to Talk to Your Health Care Provider About Rheumatoid Arthritis

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Talking Openly with Your Medical Provider

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Communicating with your Health Care Provider

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Side Effects and Talking with Your Healthcare Provider

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How to Talk to Your Healthcare Provider: Tips on Improving Communication Before your appointment. Make a list. Write down your goals for the visit and the things you most want to talk about During your appointment.

Answer questions honestly. Answer all of the questions your healthcare provider. Talking with your doctor or healthcare providers about your end-of-life wishes is a discussion to have before a crisis occurs. Chances are that he or she is waiting for you to start the conversation. When you discuss your concerns and choice.

An appointment with a healthcare provider usually means you will get a lot of information in a very short time. You can prepare by doing a little work beforehand: Think about what questions to ask your provider. Write them down and take them to your appointment. 4 Tips: Start Talking With Your Health Care Providers About Complementary Health Approaches.

When patients tell their providers about their use of complementary health practices, they can better stay in control and more effectively manage their health. When providers ask their patients, they can ensure that they are fully informed and can help patients make wise health care decisions. You shouldn’t be afraid to tell your provider anything,” says Mary Ellen Roberts, RN, APNC, MSN, FAANP, president of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, who practices in Belleville, NJ. Ms. Roberts suggests talking with neighbors, co-workers and friends for recommendations.

Talking to your healthcare provider can be a first step towards getting control of your smoking. Most people feel a little better right away, just from telling their healthcare provider about their smoking. The head care provider cannot make an accurate decision regarding your care unless he or she knows how you have been treating your problem. Ask specific questions about your condition. Ask your health professional to tell you what your diagnosis is; what caused it, what you should do about it and when it will improve.

Find out if you need to. One of the benefits of healthcare is being able to talk with your doctor regularly about your concerns. Prepare for your doctor visits with these tips Talking With Your Doctor: MedlinePlus.

Patients and health care providers share a very personal relationship. Doctors need to know a lot about you, your family, and your lifestyle to give you the best medical care. And you need to speak up and share your concerns and questions.

Talking openly with your doctor is one of the best ways to feel good about your breast cancer treatment decisions and your care. Bring a family member or friend to your appointments When meeting with your doctor, it’s a good idea to bring a family member or friend.

List of related literature:

Patient­ and family­centered health care is an approach to health care delivery that builds relationships among the health care provider, patients, and families.

“Fundamentals of Nursing E-Book” by Patricia A. Potter, Anne Griffin Perry, Patricia Stockert, Amy Hall
from Fundamentals of Nursing E-Book
by Patricia A. Potter, Anne Griffin Perry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

The health care providers and the patient will discuss and determine the plan of care together.

“Economics and Financial Management for Nurses and Nurse Leaders” by Susan J. Penner, RN, MN, MPA, DrPH, CNL
from Economics and Financial Management for Nurses and Nurse Leaders
by Susan J. Penner, RN, MN, MPA, DrPH, CNL
Springer Publishing Company, 2013

In health care, it is expected that providers will use health care terminology in their conversations about patients.

“Health Communication for Health Care Professionals: An Applied Approach” by Dr. Michael P. Pagano, PhD, PA-C
from Health Communication for Health Care Professionals: An Applied Approach
by Dr. Michael P. Pagano, PhD, PA-C
Springer Publishing Company, 2016

Health care professionals use the Internet and Skype to communicate with patients.

“Maternal Child Nursing Care E-Book” by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, Kathryn Rhodes Alden, Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Mary Catherine Cashion, David Wilson
from Maternal Child Nursing Care E-Book
by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

The health care provider invites the patient to participate: “I want to make sure that I’ve helped you understand everything you need to know about your illness.

“Fundamentals of Nursing E-Book” by Patricia A. Potter, Anne Griffin Perry, Patricia Stockert, Amy Hall
from Fundamentals of Nursing E-Book
by Patricia A. Potter, Anne Griffin Perry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2020

In many countries patients are able to access and control their care records, they are able to choose their care provider and they are able to leave their evaluative comments for all to read through on-line technologies, such abilities are changing the face of health and social care provision.

“Introduction to Nursing Informatics” by Kathryn J. Hannah, Pamela Hussey, Margaret A. Kennedy, Marion J. Ball
from Introduction to Nursing Informatics
by Kathryn J. Hannah, Pamela Hussey, et. al.
Springer London, 2014

The health plan can assist patients and their doctors to gather information, understand their treatment options, seek the best provider to address their circumstances, ensure that the providers involved in care have up-to-date patient information, and assist in navigating handoffs in the care cycle.

“Redefining Health Care: Creating Value-based Competition on Results” by Michael E. Porter, Elizabeth Olmsted Teisberg
from Redefining Health Care: Creating Value-based Competition on Results
by Michael E. Porter, Elizabeth Olmsted Teisberg
Harvard Business Review Press, 2006

So, beyond the one-on-one patient care are a range of services that are accessible to patients and providers, such as education, online discussion, and public health resources.

“Foundations of Health Information Management E-Book” by Nadinia A. Davis
from Foundations of Health Information Management E-Book
by Nadinia A. Davis
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Here, healthcare facilities need to show, that the chatbot is not necessarily replacing the physician but supporting him or her in her diagnosis and the patient will still see his physician.

“Chatbot Research and Design: Third International Workshop, CONVERSATIONS 2019, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, November 19–20, 2019, Revised Selected Papers” by Asbjørn Følstad, Theo Araujo, Symeon Papadopoulos, Effie Lai-Chong Law, Ole-Christoffer Granmo, Ewa Luger, Petter Bae Brandtzaeg
from Chatbot Research and Design: Third International Workshop, CONVERSATIONS 2019, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, November 19–20, 2019, Revised Selected Papers
by Asbjørn Følstad, Theo Araujo, et. al.
Springer International Publishing, 2020

Health information and even access to appointments are steadily shifting from face-to-face interaction to access by telephone via voice prompts and Internet-based formats.

“Health Promotion Throughout the Life Span E-Book” by Carole Lium Edelman, Carol Lynn Mandle, Elizabeth C. Kudzma
from Health Promotion Throughout the Life Span E-Book
by Carole Lium Edelman, Carol Lynn Mandle, Elizabeth C. Kudzma
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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