Some Patients Having A-Fib Have Hidden Brain Damage

 

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In a new study of patients with the heart rhythm disorder atrial fibrillation (a-fib), 4 in 10 had previously undetected brain damage, though none had a history of stroke or mini-stroke. This brain damage could put them at risk for mental decline and. Study Finds Some Patients With A-Fib Have Hidden Brain Damage.

MONDAY, Aug. 27, 2018 In a new study of patients with the heart rhythm disorder atrial fibrillation (a-fib), 4 in 10 had previously undetected brain damage, though none had a history of stroke or mini-stroke. MONDAY, Aug. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) In a new study of patients with the heart rhythm disorder atrial fibrillation, 4 in 10 had previously undetected brain damage, though none had a history of stroke or mini-stroke.

This brain damage could put them at risk for mental decline and dementia, researchers said. MONDAY, Aug. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) In a new study of patients with the heart rhythm disorder atrial fibrillation (a-fib), 4 in 10 had previously undetected brain damage, though none had a history of stroke or mini-stroke. This brain damage could put them at risk for mental decline and dementia, researchers said.

MONDAY, Aug. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) In a new study of patients with the heart rhythm disorder atrial fibrillation (a-fib), 4 in 10 had previously undetected brain damage, though none had a history of stroke or mini-stroke. Study Finds Some Patients With A-Fib Have Hidden Brain Damage MONDAY, Aug.

27, 2018 In a new study of patients with the heart rhythm disorder atrial fibrillation (a-fib), 4 in 10 had previously undetected brain damage, though none. MONDAY, Aug. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) — In a new study of patients with the heart rhythm disorder atrial fibrillation (a-fib), 4 in 10 had previously undetected brain damage, though none had a history of stroke or mini-stroke.

This brain damage could put them at risk for mental decline and dementia, researchers said. This project is supported in part by the NIH Specialized Programs of Translational Research in Acute Stroke (SPOTRIAS) Network, and NINDS grant 3P50NS055977 to Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine and UT Southwestern Medical Center.

Afib meds frequently lead to brain fog, especially beta blockers, so that could be some of it. I know I suffered from terrible brain fog when I was on Toprol XL (metoprolol). I would think that the meds from a drug-induced coma could lead to a lot of subsequent cognitive issues. Researchers find further link between A-fib, brain injury, and possible neurodegeneration.

Targeted drug found effective in patients who have.

List of related literature:

The cause of new-onset A-fib in ICU patients is not always obvious, although it is almost always related to elevated catecholamine levels associated with physiologic or pathophysiologic stress.

“Trauma: Critical Care” by William C. Wilson, Christopher M. Grande, David B. Hoyt
from Trauma: Critical Care
by William C. Wilson, Christopher M. Grande, David B. Hoyt
CRC Press, 2007

of dextroamphetamine was associated with SAH in the presence of a small middle cerebral artery aneurysm.197 Most other reports of amphetamine-related ICH and SAH have not documented preexisting vascular malformations or mycotic aneurysms.

“Stroke E-Book: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Management” by J. P. Mohr, Philip A. Wolf, Michael A. Moskowitz, Marc R Mayberg, Rudiger Von Kummer, James C. Grotta
from Stroke E-Book: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Management
by J. P. Mohr, Philip A. Wolf, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

Sheldon RA, Partridge JC, Ferriero DM: Postischemic hyperglycemia is not protective to the neonatal rat brain, Pediatr Res 32:489-493, 1992.

“Neurology of the Newborn E-Book” by Joseph J. Volpe
from Neurology of the Newborn E-Book
by Joseph J. Volpe
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2008

The patient takes no regular medication, has no medical history of note, and has undergone an MRI brain, which has revealed normal brain structure, and an EEG soon after the second episode, which reveals focal epileptiform activity.

“250 Cases in Clinical Medicine E-Book” by Eirini Kasfiki, Ciaran W P Kelly, Anna Folwell
from 250 Cases in Clinical Medicine E-Book
by Eirini Kasfiki, Ciaran W P Kelly, Anna Folwell
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Some acute conditions like stroke (Chapter 414), brain infections (Chapters 420 and 422), and trauma (Chapter 406) can produce both acute symptomatic seizures and an enduring seizure tendency, so it would seem logical to use long-term antiepileptic drug treatment.

“Goldman's Cecil Medicine,Expert Consult Premium Edition Enhanced Online Features and Print, Single Volume,24: Goldman's Cecil Medicine” by Russell La Fayette Cecil, Lee Goldman, Andrew I. Schafer
from Goldman’s Cecil Medicine,Expert Consult Premium Edition Enhanced Online Features and Print, Single Volume,24: Goldman’s Cecil Medicine
by Russell La Fayette Cecil, Lee Goldman, Andrew I. Schafer
Elsevier/Saunders, 2012

There are many reports describing loss of brain parenchymal volume as the sequelae of TBI in particular

“Neuroradiology: The Requisites E-Book” by Rohini Nadgir, David M. Yousem
from Neuroradiology: The Requisites E-Book
by Rohini Nadgir, David M. Yousem
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

brain damage in Korsakoff patients is often rather widespread.

“Cognitive Psychology: A Student's Handbook” by Michael W. Eysenck, Mark T. Keane
from Cognitive Psychology: A Student’s Handbook
by Michael W. Eysenck, Mark T. Keane
Psychology Press, 2000

Halothane also produces EEG patterns similar to those of isoflurane, but dosages of halothane that would produce burst suppression in the EEG (3-4 MAC) are associated with profound cardiovascular toxicity.

“Miller's Anesthesia, 2-Volume Set E-Book” by Michael A. Gropper, Ronald D. Miller, Lars I. Eriksson, Lee A Fleisher, Jeanine P. Wiener-Kronish, Neal H Cohen, Kate Leslie
from Miller’s Anesthesia, 2-Volume Set E-Book
by Michael A. Gropper, Ronald D. Miller, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

In older people, who may also have experienced previous brain trauma or sustained damage from other drugs, toxins, or infection, the symptoms may become pronounced.

“Stop Alzheimer's Now!: How to Prevent and Reverse Dementia, Parkinson's, ALS, Multiple Sclerosis, and Other Neurodegenerative Disorders” by Bruce Fife, Russell L Blaylock
from Stop Alzheimer’s Now!: How to Prevent and Reverse Dementia, Parkinson’s, ALS, Multiple Sclerosis, and Other Neurodegenerative Disorders
by Bruce Fife, Russell L Blaylock
Piccadilly Books, 2016

Several studies have suggested the presence of brain edema in patients with IIH.

“Neurology in Clinical Practice” by Robert B. Daroff, Gerald M Fenichel, Joseph Jankovic, John C Mazziotta
from Neurology in Clinical Practice
by Robert B. Daroff, Gerald M Fenichel, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

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Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

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23 comments

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  • My husband had a heart attack 10 years ago and was taken to hospital but by the time all tests were done they couldn’t find that he had had a heart attack. They were going to send him home but while a doctor was talking to him he had a major attack. He was stabilised and admitted to hospital, they eventually put a stent in and a pacemaker/defibrillator. He was put on blood thinners and Amiodarone and a few other medications. He was doing well until his defibrillator fired off. Went back to hospital and got sent home. Two weeks later he had a vt storm,his defibrillator fired off 56 times in 40 minutes. The paramedics tried to get his heart back into rhythm but I got told to get the family because they didn’t think he would survive. At the hospital after they tried to get his rhythm back his defibrillator did it. After all tests they found out the Amiodarone attacked his thyroid and that in turn attacked his heart. It took months to get his thyroid back to normal and with different heart medication he is still here with us. The pacemaker is keeping him going because his heart is pretty bad. He only has 18% of his heart working by itself.

  • Doc, love your content. Amazing. You have multiple talents!! I learn a lot from these videos and love your bedside manner. Could you do a video on low blood pressure? What are some causes and how do you treat them?

  • 4 weeks after my open heart surgery I went into afib and they gave me cardizem and it worked really fast and brought my heart back into normal rhythm. It felt like my heart flipped lol. I’m on plavix and flecanide for blood clots and afib.

  • AFIB seems to run in my family my mom and two brothers and began having it after a triple bypass. Mom also had 3 out 5 sisters who had it. Is it normal for AFIB to run in families like that?

  • I wanted to ask I’m a 46 years young my question is my chest has been making it tight and it hurt but it comes and goes but when it come it really hurt my chest and I get really dizzy nauseas and my arm and my fact tiggle and my leg goes numb I just feel the doctors don’t listen to me idk what to do thank may you can talk about it

  • Is the end game of people with afib death? Like do they end up dying of a secondary issue caused by afib or can they live a full late age life.

  • Great talk Dr. Kneller! First time I’ve heard a heart specialist cover up to date appropriate lifestyle and diet recommendations! I’ve had Familial AFib for 40 yrs. and have studied it on and off for that length of time but no luck yet getting rid of it but you motivated me to try higher doses of my supplements and remain diligent with my exercise regimen!

  • Could you do a video about subventricular tachycardia? I was recently dx after suffering with it for about 3 years (38/F, mother). EMS used Adenosine after I was laying on their stretcher with a rate of over 180 bpm. How does the Adenosine work to reset the heart? I know it is curative with ablation, could you explain how they go in surgically and accomplish that? Is it similar to the way they go in to reopen arteries?

  • Will you check a BNP or Pro-BNP on someone presenting with A-Fib? Or will you only perform the BNP/Pro-BNP if they present with other symptoms related to CHF?

  • I know this is not this topic but I have a ganglin cyst on my left knee (Don’t know if I spelled that correct) and I was wondering how long they take to go away. I need to get back to practice yoga, flexibility, and contortion.
    It hurts if I do certain leg stretches.

  • Can u help me wit my ear idk if I have a earache or a ear infection but it’s hurts when I talk I can’t really hear in it and it hurts when I stretch and it sound like sum busting

  • What is your understanding of fibromyalgia? I was diagnosed but most doctors look at me like I’m a hypochondriac what do you think

  • Great information, I have chf and the atrial fibrillation. I learn so much from you. Thank you again for the video, love you bunches!

  • I enjoyed the video and I also have AFIB off and on and I have been cardioverted more times than I can count. I have also had ablation surgery twice and am going in again for a third. That seems to work for a while but over time it starts coming back and happening more frequently. I am wondering why it is happening so much now when it used to be hardly ever. Even my cardiologist and surgeon are still tryin to figure it out.

  • Thanks for all the AF info. I’ve had episodes for 30 years and haven’t ever been given procainamide. Usually I get the ‘nap and the zap’.

  • Excellent video on afib and tx. I wish these kind of videos had been around when I was in nursing school. You are a great teacher, and I think that you’re easy to understand, both for me as an RN, and to people who present with various illnesses. Your videos would be an excellent resource to help them understand their condition. Keep up the awesome work, and thanks for taking the time to teach us!

  • Great presentation. You may have alleviated some of the fear for many people. I would like to hear about other conditions, common ones, that are seen in the E. R., in, “what happens”? Thanks Dr. Oller.

  • If I have a patient with CHF on metoprolol etc… with right plueral effusion from ascites. I want to drain the effusion with a needle, not a tube, what sedative would you recommend for the pain?

  • I have had 3 NSTEMI heart attacks, but with angina. I have 5 stents now and by the way I’m feeling I’ll need a stress test soon to see what’s going on.
    You always have such good videos, very informative.

  • Excellent presentation. You covered all the bases beautifully. I’ve found that quite a few patients presenting with shortness of breathe, difficulties with breathing and they are dehydrated. That said, ALWAYS go to the ER with any chest pain, difficulty breathing, etc. I’ve been zapped in the ER after a Grand Mal seizure, it’s not fun!! The CPR in the ambulance broke three ribs but I’m not complaining…I’m alive and all who kept me alive get gifts throughout the year. So thankful for your videos, you are an absolutely amazing doctor. Cheers

  • My Mom had AFib. Was on Eliquis and a blood pressure medication. She had stroke in August 2018. Nov 14 2018 she suffered a subdural hemorrhage and passed on Nov 17 2018. She was in a no win situation I believe.

  • I am one of the pioneers of Open Heart Surgery for the U.S. I was born with V.S.D. (Ventricular Septal Defect) it was repaired in 1956, I was 15 months old. As a result I was left with Ventricular Arrhythmia I am checked regularly by my Cardiologist and P.C.P. but I have never gotten a straight answer on how dangerous is this condition!

  • My local ER told me to suck it up and sent me home. I have weekly episodes. I’m 37 with 2 small kids. I have all my paperwork together for their guardianship should I die.