Selecting an Obstetrician or Midwife What Questions Must I Be Asking

 

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Before interviewing a potential OB/GYN, write down questions so you won’t forget them, such as: Does this doctor practice at the hospital or facility where you’d like to give birth? Does the practice accept your insurance plan?About the Care Provider Your first meeting with your ob-gyn or certified nurse-midwife is not only an opportunity for you to introduce yourself it’s your chance to learn more about her too. Some 8 out of 10 women choose an obstetricianOB for short to monitor their pregnancies and deliver their babies. The OB is a medical doctor with. If you have already selected a healthcare provider, ask where he or she delivers babies.

If it is a hospital, your questions might include the following: Is the hospital a reasonable driving distance? When should I sign up to take childbirth education classes and take a tour of the hospital?How important is the hospital where the obstetrician attends births? Ideally, you should be comfortable with the hospital where you give birth as well as with your provider.

Most obstetricians have admitting privileges to just one hospital. So when you choose a care provider, you’re usually choosing the place where you’ll give birth. Ask questions – lots of them!

You wouldn’t hire a new employee, or a babysitter for your children without asking lots of questions. Nor shold you hire an obstetrician without asking questions. You are hiring your obstetrician to be with you during the most intimate, vulnerable and special moments of. When deciding who to choose, start by asking your doctor or OB if they can make a recommendation. You also may want to talk with any friends who have worked with a midwife to see what their.

Once you’ve decided what type of practitioner you want — doctor or certified nurse-midwife — the next step is to find the one who best fits the bill. It sounds like you’ve got your heart set on an obstetrician, so if you’ve already been seeing an OB-GYN for your gynecological care and have a great relationship with him or her, there’s. If you choose to use a private obstetrician or midwife, ask about how they work and the fees they charge when you meet them so you can make an informed decision. The following checklist suggests questions that you might ask your obstetrician or midwife.

The important thing when choosing an obstetrician is that the patient feels comfortable with her doctor and talk about their Caesarean section rate, episiotomy, & postpartum care.

List of related literature:

Third, so that the obstetrician or midwife may have better contact with the mother, to get to know her and answer her questions.

“Parenthood in America: An Encyclopedia” by Lawrence Balter, Robert B. McCall
from Parenthood in America: An Encyclopedia
by Lawrence Balter, Robert B. McCall
ABC-CLIO, 2000

They may ask about the provider’s usual practices and the provider’s beliefs about areas that are important to them, such as medication, episiotomies, or aspects of infant care.

“Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women's Health Nursing E-Book” by Sharon Smith Murray, Emily Slone McKinney
from Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women’s Health Nursing E-Book
by Sharon Smith Murray, Emily Slone McKinney
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

They will often require specific information from the midwife, and will frequently be dependent upon guidance from her; they often don’t know what they need to know, in order to make an informed decision.

“Joints and Connective Tissues: General Practice: The Integrative Approach Series” by Kerryn Phelps, Craig Hassed
from Joints and Connective Tissues: General Practice: The Integrative Approach Series
by Kerryn Phelps, Craig Hassed
Elsevier Health Sciences APAC, 2012

Throughout her prenatal care, all tests and options are explained and she is asked how she is feeling, what questions she may have, and any issues she wishes to discuss.

“Advanced Practice Nursing E-Book: An Integrative Approach” by Ann B. Hamric, Judith A. Spross, Charlene M. Hanson
from Advanced Practice Nursing E-Book: An Integrative Approach
by Ann B. Hamric, Judith A. Spross, Charlene M. Hanson
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2008

The best obstetricians are those who had midwives as teachers of normal birth, who gave them a good grounding in the normal process of labor and birth before they entered the part of their training pertaining to obstetrical pathology.

“Birth Matters: How What We Don't Know About Nature, Bodies, and Surgery Can Hurt Us” by Ina May Gaskin, Ani DiFranco
from Birth Matters: How What We Don’t Know About Nature, Bodies, and Surgery Can Hurt Us
by Ina May Gaskin, Ani DiFranco
Seven Stories Press, 2011

For example, if the woman has small children with her, the nurse can ask about her plans for child care during the time of labor and birth.

“Maternity and Women's Health Care E-Book” by Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Shannon E. Perry, Mary Catherine Cashion, Kathryn Rhodes Alden
from Maternity and Women’s Health Care E-Book
by Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Shannon E. Perry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2014

Some perceptions of midwives and obstetricians of the role of the midwife.

“Midwifery and the Medicalization of Childbirth: Comparative Perspectives” by Edwin R. Van Teijlingen, George W. Lowis, Peter McCaffery, Maureen Porter
from Midwifery and the Medicalization of Childbirth: Comparative Perspectives
by Edwin R. Van Teijlingen, George W. Lowis, et. al.
Nova Science Publishers, Incorporated, 2004

The research midwife’s job is important and diverse.

“Myles' Textbook for Midwives E-Book” by Jayne E. Marshall, Maureen D. Raynor
from Myles’ Textbook for Midwives E-Book
by Jayne E. Marshall, Maureen D. Raynor
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2020

Many patients report the midwives ask more questions and try to get them to talk more about their pregnancies.

“Reproducing Race: An Ethnography of Pregnancy as a Site of Racialization” by Khiara Bridges
from Reproducing Race: An Ethnography of Pregnancy as a Site of Racialization
by Khiara Bridges
University of California Press, 2011

They may ask about the provider’s usual practices and the provider’s beliefs about areas that are important to them, such as medication, use of episiotomies, or aspects of infant care.

“Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women's Health Nursing” by Sharon Smith Murray, MSN, RN, C, Emily Slone McKinney, MSN, RN, C
from Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women’s Health Nursing
by Sharon Smith Murray, MSN, RN, C, Emily Slone McKinney, MSN, RN, C
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2013

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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23 comments

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  • I m a doctor. I m conducting normal delieveries, antenatal checkups, postnatal checkups. From last 5 years. M I eligible to work and get registration in Australia

  • Probably sound stupid but whats the difference between an ob doctor, midwife, or doula? Do they all accept insurance? I am not a fan of my ob doctor and for my next baby i would like someone more helpful in answering my questions.

  • Seriously!! The first video that’s been SUPER helpful in all of this. I’m 9 weeks now and I’m looking for a good obstetrician in Melbourne Australia, and I’m freaking out because even though I have insurance it’s still gonna cost so much out of pocket expenses, it’s been a bit stressful to be honest! I feel really reassured watching your video. Thank you so much ��

  • Sarah, thank you! You have helped me beyond belief I’m watching all of your videos I wish I had known about you sooner but I just discovered you. Hearing it all from a professional puts me at ease and I feel more equipped to choose my Dr/midwife. I’ve taken notes on multiple of your videos to help me choose a doctor/midwife/ hospital, and tons of questions that have come to mind as I watch.
    You’re so helpful I’m so thankful for you!

  • Im 38 weeks pregnant today and i was wondering what’s the best position and push when you have an epidural? Plus anxiety prior to birth?

  • I live in a small place,almost all doctors have super high csection rates.I want to try for a vbac.I am now almost 30 weeks pregnant and between 2 doctors.One has experience with vbac and is pro natural but our chemistry is awful.I am not feeling comfortable at all and believe he lacks motivation and encouragement.The other one has been my obg for many years,I feel comfortable with him.But… he has just started to have women with vbac,he has experience with only 1 or 2.Also I am afraid he will make up excuses for a new csection at the last minute.I am thinking about having a doula at home before getting to the hospital with my doctor in order to increase my chances for a vbac.What do you think?
    Thank you!

  • Do pregnancy health care providers who do not force you to do pelvic exams exist? I am burdened so deeply with the thought I having to go through that with a stranger &I worry this distressing experience will effect my long term mental health. I can’t help but think I’d feel violated. Which I would.

  • Would a midwife see me if I have sch I’m so tired of the er and how awful the doctors are when something does come up. I need someone who is more involved with my pregnancy and my baby and not someone who looks at her like a medical problem.

  • I wish i seen this video before I chose my doctor because I honestly don’t like them! It wasnt a planned pregnancy but next time I definitely will choose better

  • Thanks for this! Is is common practice to be able to set up a meet and greet/initial interview? I have been trying to set these up and some people seem like that is not something that people normally do/I have to set up an actual appt.

  • Do pregnancy health care providers who do not force you to do prenatal exams exist? I am burdened so deeply with the thought I having to go through that with a stranger &I worry this distressing experience will effect my long term mental health. I can’t help but think I’d feel violated. Which I would.

  • I changed my doctor my last doctor really upset me and actually made me cry and the nurse that was in there didn’t even stop him from making me upset he also completely shot down my whole idea of what I wanted my labor to be like but now that I’ve switched this new doctor is the best anyone who lives in the Nashville area should visit baby co birthing center and ask work with Doctor Thigpen he’s been making my husband and my birth experience so much better we always leave the center in the best mood afterwards and it’s so comfortable

  • Oh man this hits close to home… I wish I could switch but once I realized I should it was too late and no one in the area who is a better fit would take me. It’s so hard to make these decisions because doctors don’t really welcome “labor and delivery” talk early on in pregnancy so you may not find out how they honestly feel about stuff until later on, even if you ask. Frustrating.

    I also wish I’d switched doulas earlier when I started getting red flags. Now I’m basically stuck with someone who doesn’t respond to my texts and I’m only a month away from my due date �� ugh

  • I give birth to my daughter at Massachusetts general hospital, I was pushing for almost 4 hours, it was about 10 doctors in my room �������� plus 3 students and one angel nurse, they are all great
    , all patients have the right to fire anyone who disrespect or miss treated them

  • I 100% plan on using a midwife.

    I just saw my sister and sister-in-law go through having babies at hospitals. They treat it more like a “disease” or “medical condition” than the natural course of life. It seemed like everything they were allowed to charge you for, they did it.

    My sister-in-law went 2 days over her due date and the doctor basically forced her into getting induced. The labor went way too fast as soon as the IV was administered. She ended up having a C-section because the pitocin made the contractions too strong, they worried they were stressing the baby and other complications started happening. Her baby was born very underweight and slightly underdeveloped (he caught up right away and is perfectly healthy now.) The doctor even said if they waited at least a week more, everything probably would have went smoother and he could have been a little more developed. She had to stay in the hospital for 5 days after that.

    My sister was lucky enough to be in labor for about 7 hours, had a relatively small but healthy baby. She kept telling them she wanted to do it without an epidural and she was doing AMAZING until one nurse came in and guilted her into getting one because “when you’re stressed, the baby is stressed. We can get this over with sooner if you get the epidural.” She still had to stay in the hospital for 4 days. She had zero complications, the baby has zero complications; she still had to stay in the hospital almost as long as my sister-in-law who had major surgery and her baby had to be in an incubator for 2 days. My sister was going stir crazy but they refused to release her even though they only checked on her or the baby a handful of times.

    My best friend used a midwife a few years ago and that process seemed way less stressful. She was considered “high risk” for a few reasons and still had to do less tests and ultrasounds than my perfectly healthy sisters. Even with her bleeding disorder, the delivery went a lot smoother with a midwife who cared more about her patients than her paycheck. There were only a few times her midwife had her go to a doctor’s office during her pregnancy, but only because she had some preexisting problems before getting pregnant.

  • I just found your channel and your content is incredible! Dumb YouTube algorithm. I’m almost 30 weeks pregnant and all of your videos cover all of my questions. This is the exact type of content I’ve been needing!

  • That’s a good point you made about asking what the C-section rate for each doctor vs. hospital is. Good to know! I just found your channel and am enjoying the videos.

  • What a great video! I find so many people are still confused about the topic and find it hard to make an informed decision. Keep up the great work on your channel:)

  • I’m currently in labor. I have been seeing this midewife throughout my entire pregnancy. I didn’t like her day one but she was the only midwife close to us who did the natural thing I was looking for. I’m seriously regretting it. She is unsupportive and treats me like an inconvenience. I’m scared to call or text her. I’ve been in labor close to 24 hours and only talked to her twice. Please ladies make a good decision, if you don’t like them GO TO SOMEONE ELSE! Your midwife can make or break this experience for you

  • I have an OB, in my country you have to have an OB it’s illegal to have a midwife up to a couple years ago. But I chose an OB because I have tachycardia and genital herpes and would feel safer in the hands of an OB because of the tachycardia and the possibility for needing a C section since I have genital herpes. But had I not had those things I’d def go with a midwife.

  • I would also find out what the hospital will provide (diapers, pads, mesh underwear, lanolin cream, nipple pads, etc.). Most hospitals provide a lot, but not all.

  • How can I ask the hospital if they have plus size mom biases without sounding rude? I don’t want to be forced into a c section or unnecessary interventions based solely on my size.

  • Here are the questions I had written down

    Is low lighting an option?
    What positions am I allowed to push in?
    Do you provide birth balls? Squatting bars?
    Can I eat and drink during labor?
    How many medical staff members will be present, assuming there are no complications?
    How long can I delay cord cutting?