Selecting an Obstetrician or Midwife What Questions Must I Be Asking

 

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Before interviewing a potential OB/GYN, write down questions so you won’t forget them, such as: Does this doctor practice at the hospital or facility where you’d like to give birth? Does the practice accept your insurance plan?About the Care Provider Your first meeting with your ob-gyn or certified nurse-midwife is not only an opportunity for you to introduce yourself it’s your chance to learn more about her too. Some 8 out of 10 women choose an obstetricianOB for short to monitor their pregnancies and deliver their babies. The OB is a medical doctor with. If you have already selected a healthcare provider, ask where he or she delivers babies.

If it is a hospital, your questions might include the following: Is the hospital a reasonable driving distance? When should I sign up to take childbirth education classes and take a tour of the hospital?How important is the hospital where the obstetrician attends births? Ideally, you should be comfortable with the hospital where you give birth as well as with your provider.

Most obstetricians have admitting privileges to just one hospital. So when you choose a care provider, you’re usually choosing the place where you’ll give birth. Ask questions – lots of them!

You wouldn’t hire a new employee, or a babysitter for your children without asking lots of questions. Nor shold you hire an obstetrician without asking questions. You are hiring your obstetrician to be with you during the most intimate, vulnerable and special moments of. When deciding who to choose, start by asking your doctor or OB if they can make a recommendation. You also may want to talk with any friends who have worked with a midwife to see what their.

Once you’ve decided what type of practitioner you want — doctor or certified nurse-midwife — the next step is to find the one who best fits the bill. It sounds like you’ve got your heart set on an obstetrician, so if you’ve already been seeing an OB-GYN for your gynecological care and have a great relationship with him or her, there’s. If you choose to use a private obstetrician or midwife, ask about how they work and the fees they charge when you meet them so you can make an informed decision. The following checklist suggests questions that you might ask your obstetrician or midwife.

The important thing when choosing an obstetrician is that the patient feels comfortable with her doctor and talk about their Caesarean section rate, episiotomy, & postpartum care.

List of related literature:

Third, so that the obstetrician or midwife may have better contact with the mother, to get to know her and answer her questions.

“Parenthood in America: An Encyclopedia” by Lawrence Balter, Robert B. McCall
from Parenthood in America: An Encyclopedia
by Lawrence Balter, Robert B. McCall
ABC-CLIO, 2000

They may ask about the provider’s usual practices and the provider’s beliefs about areas that are important to them, such as medication, episiotomies, or aspects of infant care.

“Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women's Health Nursing E-Book” by Sharon Smith Murray, Emily Slone McKinney
from Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women’s Health Nursing E-Book
by Sharon Smith Murray, Emily Slone McKinney
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

They will often require specific information from the midwife, and will frequently be dependent upon guidance from her; they often don’t know what they need to know, in order to make an informed decision.

“Joints and Connective Tissues: General Practice: The Integrative Approach Series” by Kerryn Phelps, Craig Hassed
from Joints and Connective Tissues: General Practice: The Integrative Approach Series
by Kerryn Phelps, Craig Hassed
Elsevier Health Sciences APAC, 2012

Throughout her prenatal care, all tests and options are explained and she is asked how she is feeling, what questions she may have, and any issues she wishes to discuss.

“Advanced Practice Nursing E-Book: An Integrative Approach” by Ann B. Hamric, Judith A. Spross, Charlene M. Hanson
from Advanced Practice Nursing E-Book: An Integrative Approach
by Ann B. Hamric, Judith A. Spross, Charlene M. Hanson
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2008

The best obstetricians are those who had midwives as teachers of normal birth, who gave them a good grounding in the normal process of labor and birth before they entered the part of their training pertaining to obstetrical pathology.

“Birth Matters: How What We Don't Know About Nature, Bodies, and Surgery Can Hurt Us” by Ina May Gaskin, Ani DiFranco
from Birth Matters: How What We Don’t Know About Nature, Bodies, and Surgery Can Hurt Us
by Ina May Gaskin, Ani DiFranco
Seven Stories Press, 2011

For example, if the woman has small children with her, the nurse can ask about her plans for child care during the time of labor and birth.

“Maternity and Women's Health Care E-Book” by Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Shannon E. Perry, Mary Catherine Cashion, Kathryn Rhodes Alden
from Maternity and Women’s Health Care E-Book
by Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Shannon E. Perry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2014

Some perceptions of midwives and obstetricians of the role of the midwife.

“Midwifery and the Medicalization of Childbirth: Comparative Perspectives” by Edwin R. Van Teijlingen, George W. Lowis, Peter McCaffery, Maureen Porter
from Midwifery and the Medicalization of Childbirth: Comparative Perspectives
by Edwin R. Van Teijlingen, George W. Lowis, et. al.
Nova Science Publishers, Incorporated, 2004

The research midwife’s job is important and diverse.

“Myles' Textbook for Midwives E-Book” by Jayne E. Marshall, Maureen D. Raynor
from Myles’ Textbook for Midwives E-Book
by Jayne E. Marshall, Maureen D. Raynor
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2020

Many patients report the midwives ask more questions and try to get them to talk more about their pregnancies.

“Reproducing Race: An Ethnography of Pregnancy as a Site of Racialization” by Khiara Bridges
from Reproducing Race: An Ethnography of Pregnancy as a Site of Racialization
by Khiara Bridges
University of California Press, 2011

They may ask about the provider’s usual practices and the provider’s beliefs about areas that are important to them, such as medication, use of episiotomies, or aspects of infant care.

“Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women's Health Nursing” by Sharon Smith Murray, MSN, RN, C, Emily Slone McKinney, MSN, RN, C
from Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women’s Health Nursing
by Sharon Smith Murray, MSN, RN, C, Emily Slone McKinney, MSN, RN, C
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2013

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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3 comments

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  • I m a doctor. I m conducting normal delieveries, antenatal checkups, postnatal checkups. From last 5 years. M I eligible to work and get registration in Australia

  • Probably sound stupid but whats the difference between an ob doctor, midwife, or doula? Do they all accept insurance? I am not a fan of my ob doctor and for my next baby i would like someone more helpful in answering my questions.

  • Seriously!! The first video that’s been SUPER helpful in all of this. I’m 9 weeks now and I’m looking for a good obstetrician in Melbourne Australia, and I’m freaking out because even though I have insurance it’s still gonna cost so much out of pocket expenses, it’s been a bit stressful to be honest! I feel really reassured watching your video. Thank you so much ��