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July 20, 2015 / 7:08 AM / HealthDay It’s still very early, but scientists say a test based on a patient’s saliva might someday help detect Alzheimer’s disease. Scientists have long sought to find accurate, easier methods of detecting the disease, and now a promising new study shows that a simple saliva test might just do the trick. Researchers from the University of Alberta say they’ve identified three biomarkers that indicate Alzheimer’s, as well as mild cognitive impairment, a more common condition with minimal impairment compared to Alzheimer’s.

Very small study shows some promise, but much more research will be needed, experts say. (HealthDay)—It’s still very early, but scientists say a test based on a patient’s saliva might someday help. Simple Saliva Test Could Show Risk for Alzheimer’s A study from Canada suggests that a simple saliva test may be able to detect Alzheimer’s disease before symptoms occur. The study was presented at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Washington D.C. earlier this year. Newly developed saliva test can now help in detecting Alzheimer’s disease, reveals a new study.

Scientists have identified biomarkers for identifying Alzheimer’s and mild cognitive impairment in. SUNDAY, July 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) It’s still very early, but scientists say a test based on a patient’s saliva might someday help detect Alzheimer’s disease. “Saliva is easily obtained, safe and affordable, and has promising potential for predicting and tracking cognitive decline, but we’re in the very early stages of this work and much more research is needed,” study author Shraddha Sapkota, a. CNN reports that new research was presented at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference this week, showing that proteins in the saliva can reflect changes in the brain. It’s still in. SUNDAY, July 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) It’s still very early, but scientists say a test based on a patient’s saliva might someday help detect Alzheimer’s disease. “Saliva is easily obtained, safe and affordable, and has promising potential for predicting and tracking cognitive decline, but we’re in the very early stages of this work and much more research is needed,” study author Shraddha Sapkot.

It’s still very early, but scientists say a test based on a patient’s saliva might someday help detect Alzheimer’s disease. Saliva is easily obtained, safe and affordable, and has promising potential for predicting and tracking cognitive decline, but we’re in the very. A new study suggests that an individual’s risk of Alzheimer’s disease could be predicted through a saliva test. The findings were presented by a team of researchers at the 2015 Alzheimer’s Association International Conference (AAIC).

The study’s lead author, Shraddha Sapkota, and her colleagues used liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry ( LCMS) to study saliva samples from 22.

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I thought this will have an impact on neurodegenerative diseases Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Sjogren’s and aging because saliva production is low in these disease conditions.

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However, numerous neurologic studies show that adults with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia perform poorly on tests of smell detection and identification as a result of cell death in the olfactory bulb (Vance, 2002).

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Studies have also linked the loss of smell to Alzheimer’s dementia and

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viral hepatitis A, B, and C. Saliva has been used as a diagnostic aid for Alzheimer’s disease, cystic fibrosis, diabetes, and diseases of the adrenal cortex.

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We do not know whether or not the quantity or quality of saliva in healthy individuals is disturbed by age, but we do know that that elders take a vast array of potentially xerostomic medications for depression, sleeping disorders, hypertension, allergies, heart problems, and many other troubles of old age.

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Several experimental studies are under way assessing whether this will work in people who have Alzheimer disease.

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These reports suggest that the brain of patients with Alzheimer disease is associated with inadequate antioxidant status and/or increased oxidative stress.

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Indeed, diminished odor recognition both correlates with cognitive decline in nondemented older people (Swan and Carmelli, 2002) and may indicate the progression of Alzheimer’s dementia.

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Vitamin B12 levels in serum and cerebrospinal fluid of people with Alzheimer’s disease.

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Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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2 comments

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  • I had no idea about Alzheimer’s, till one of my friend shared with me that he had to live with its early stage, at his thirties. Seriously, it made me quiver with fear. I thought, what I should do if I were in his condition. I dug around and coincidentally stumbled on the web site reported the effective prevention method.

  • Smell is just one symptom which indicates that it might be worth looking at other possible symptoms more closely. It is not an open and shut diagnosis. There are cognitive tests, dexterity tests, psychological tests… I suspect the peanut butter test is just one part of a process, and if it helps a doctor make an earlier diagnosis, more power to them.