Safeguard Your Son Or Daughter From Accidental Poisoning

 

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How to protect your child from accidental poisoning (HealthDay)—Young children are at high risk for accidental poisoning, so parents and other caregivers need to take precautions, a pediatric. Because they look the same and are sometimes in bottles that are very, very similar, a young child tends not to be able to tell the difference.” What should you do if your child comes into contact with one of these potential toxins? Call 911 if a child stops breathing or responding after consuming a poison. Otherwise, call the national 24-hour Poison Control Hotline, 1-800-222-1222, which will connect you to. Call 911 if a child stops breathing or responding after consuming a poison.

Otherwise, call the national 24-hour Poison Control Hotline, 1-800-222-1222, which will connect you to your regional poison control specialists, Rangan said. More information. The U.S.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on poisoning prevention. Given enough time, kids can break into tamper-resistant bottles. Parents must keep medications up high and locked away so that they are “out of sight, out of reach, out of mind,” said Rangan, who is also assistant medical director of the California Poison Control System. If there any type of poisons in your house keep all those in a place where children could not reach. They drink or eat those without understanding what are they.

If there is any accidental inserting bring the child to the nearest hospital as soon as possible. Given enough time, children can break into tamper-resistant bottles. Parents must keep medications up high and locked away so that they are”out of sight, out of reach, out of mind,” said Rangan, who is also assistant medical director of the California Poison Control System. Do not feed the child or administer liquids. This will make the object lodge farther down.If your child ingests a poisonous substance, call the Palmetto Poison Center (PPC) immediately at 1-800-222-1222.

The PPC offers assistance 24 hours a day, seven days a week. What should you do if your child comes into contact with one of these potential toxins? Call 911 if a child stops breathing or responding after consuming a poison.

Otherwise, call the national 24-hour Poison Control Hotline, 1-800-222-1222, which will connect you to your regional poison control specialists, Rangan said. More information. Keep medicines and toxic products, such cleaning solutions and detergent pods, in their original packaging where children can’t see or get them.

Know the number. Put the nationwide poison control center phone number, 1-800-222-1222, on or near every telephone in your home and program it into your cell phone. Here are some safe practices parents, grandparents and caregivers can adopt to greatly reduce the risk of accidental poisoning: Poison‐Proof Your Home. Children act fast and so do poisons. It is important to have layers of poison prevention protection inside the home.

Keep all products closed and in their original bottles or containers.

List of related literature:

Using child-resistant caps, placing medications and cleaning fluids and powders out of the reach of children, leaving potentially poisonous materials in original containers, and removing poisonous plants from the home can prevent accidental ingestion of poisonous materials.

“Potter & Perry's Fundamentals of Nursing Australian Version E-Book” by Jackie Crisp, Catherine Taylor
from Potter & Perry’s Fundamentals of Nursing Australian Version E-Book
by Jackie Crisp, Catherine Taylor
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

Simple ways to prevent poisoning include using child-resistant pill bottle caps.

“Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2019 E-Book: 5 Books in 1” by Fred F. Ferri
from Ferri’s Clinical Advisor 2019 E-Book: 5 Books in 1
by Fred F. Ferri
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

It is essential to prevent poisoning by: • ensuring medicines and chemicals are stored safely out of reach of children in locked or childproof cupboards • never leaving medicines unattended or within reach of children • leaving medicines and chemicals in the original containers (and not decanted

“Havard's Nursing Guide to Drugs Mobile optimised site” by Adriana P. Tiziani
from Havard’s Nursing Guide to Drugs Mobile optimised site
by Adriana P. Tiziani
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

Assist the parents in identifying their home and child’s risk factors for accidental poisoning (see reduction of risk potential).

“Lippincott's Content Review for NCLEX-RN” by Diane M. Billings
from Lippincott’s Content Review for NCLEX-RN
by Diane M. Billings
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2008

Prevention All parents must be educated to prevent accidental poisoning.

“Foundations of Nursing E-Book” by Kim Cooper, Kelly Gosnell
from Foundations of Nursing E-Book
by Kim Cooper, Kelly Gosnell
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

In the home accidental poisoning is a greater risk for toddlers, preschoolers, and young school-age children, who often ingest household cleaning solutions, medications, or personal hygiene products.

“Potter and Perry's Fundamentals of Nursing: Second South Asia Edition E-Book” by Sharma Suresh
from Potter and Perry’s Fundamentals of Nursing: Second South Asia Edition E-Book
by Sharma Suresh
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

There is good evidence that child-resistant containers and packaging prevent childhood poisoning.

“A Textbook of Children's and Young People's Nursing E-Book” by Edward Alan Glasper, Dr Jim Richardson, James Richardson
from A Textbook of Children’s and Young People’s Nursing E-Book
by Edward Alan Glasper, Dr Jim Richardson, James Richardson
Elsevier Health Sciences UK, 2010

It is not uncommon in cases of childhood poisoning that parents are unaware that the material was potentially poisonous, that they took no special precautions because their child had been no problem previously, or that they thought the material was inaccessible to the child.

“Remington: The Science and Practice of Pharmacy” by David B. Troy, Joseph Price Remington, Paul Beringer
from Remington: The Science and Practice of Pharmacy
by David B. Troy, Joseph Price Remington, Paul Beringer
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2006

The only certain way to prevent poisoning is to remove toxic agents, which means placing containers out of the infant’s reach or contact.

“Wong's Nursing Care of Infants and Children Multimedia Enhanced Version” by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson, Donna L. Wong, Annette Baker, R.N., Patrick Barrera, Debbie Fraser Askin
from Wong’s Nursing Care of Infants and Children Multimedia Enhanced Version
by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson, et. al.
Mosby/Elsevier, 2013

Preventive measures that should be observed by all caregivers of small children are listed in Family Teaching Tips: Preventing Poisoning.

“Broadribb's Introductory Pediatric Nursing” by Nancy T. Hatfield
from Broadribb’s Introductory Pediatric Nursing
by Nancy T. Hatfield
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2003

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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