Researchers Concentrate on Risks for Leukemia After Cancer Of The Breast Treatment

 

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The scientists looked at 88 breast cancer survivors with treatment-related leukemia and found that many had a personal and family history of cancer, suggesting a genetic susceptibility to cancer. Also, 20 percent of the women had an inherited gene mutation that increases the risk of breast cancer, according to the study published Dec. 7 in the journal Cancer. MONDAY, Dec. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) Researchers say they’re zeroing in on factors that may increase the risk of leukemia after breast cancer treatment.

The findings are. Researchers Focus on Risk Factors for Leukemia After Breast Cancer Treatment. Family history of cancer, inherited gene mutation seem to raise chances of secondary malignancy. While the breast cancer treatments target malignant cells, they can also affect healthy cells and could increase the risk of leukemia later, the researchers said.

The scientists looked at 88 breast cancer survivors with treatment-related leukemia and found that many had a personal and family history of cancer, suggesting a genetic susceptibility to cancer. While the breast cancer treatments target malignant cells, they can also affect healthy cells and could increase the risk of leukaemia later, the researchers said. Read: Gene Mutation.

The excess risk (the excess number of cases of leukemia per 10,000 patients) within the first 10 years after the diagnosis of breast cancer was estimated by multiplying the relative risk minus. While the risk of developing leukemia after radiation therapy or chemotherapy to treat early-stage breast cancer is VERY small, a large study suggests that this risk is twice as high as has been reported. The research. Specific risk factors for leukemia include: Exposure to cancer-causing agents. People exposed to high doses of radiation (from the explosion of an atomic bomb, working in an atomic weapons plant, or a nuclear reactor accident.

Radiation treatment for cancer has also been linked to an increased risk of AML. The risk varies based on the amount of radiation given and what area is treated. The possible risks of leukemia from exposure.

There is a small increased risk of developing leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome after receiving certain chemotherapy (chemo) drugs for early breast cancer. The risk is higher if both chemo and radiation therapy.

List of related literature:

Acute myeloid leukemia after adjuvant breast cancer therapy in older women: understanding risk.

“Holland-Frei Cancer Medicine 8” by Waun Ki Hong, Robert C. Bast Jr, American Association for Cancer Research, William Hait, Donald W. Kufe, James F. Holland, Emil Frei Iii
from Holland-Frei Cancer Medicine 8
by Waun Ki Hong, Robert C. Bast Jr, et. al.
People’s Medical Publishing House, 2010

Increased risk of acute leukemia after adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer: a population-based study.

“The Chemotherapy Source Book” by Michael Clinton Perry
from The Chemotherapy Source Book
by Michael Clinton Perry
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2008

Risk of recurrence and chemotherapy benefit for patients with node-negative, estrogen receptor–positive breast cancer: recurrence score alone and integrated with pathologic and clinical factors.

“Abeloff's Clinical Oncology E-Book” by John E. Niederhuber, James O. Armitage, James H Doroshow, Michael B. Kastan, Joel E. Tepper
from Abeloff’s Clinical Oncology E-Book
by John E. Niederhuber, James O. Armitage, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

The distribution of women diagnosed with breast cancer who had a first-degree relative with a history of the disease was determined to be between 10 and 16 percent (Collaborative Group on Hormonal Factors in Breast Cancer, 2001).

“Biomarkers in Toxicology” by Ramesh C. Gupta
from Biomarkers in Toxicology
by Ramesh C. Gupta
Elsevier Science, 2014

Incidence risk factors and survival in breast cancer: Report on five years of followup observation.

“A Guide to Evidence-based Integrative and Complementary Medicine” by Vicki Kotsirilos, Luis Vitetta, Avni Sali
from A Guide to Evidence-based Integrative and Complementary Medicine
by Vicki Kotsirilos, Luis Vitetta, Avni Sali
Elsevier Health Sciences APAC, 2011

In fact, a 1997 study showed the risk of breast cancer for variations on the BRCA1 gene to be closer to 56 percent, and only 16 percent for ovarian cancer.

“Goddesses Never Age: The Secret Prescription for Radiance, Vitality, and Well-Being” by Christiane Northrup, M.D.
from Goddesses Never Age: The Secret Prescription for Radiance, Vitality, and Well-Being
by Christiane Northrup, M.D.
Hay House, 2015

One study, the meta-analysis from the Collaborative Group on Hormonal Factors in Breast Cancer (CGHFBC),18,18 examined data from 52,705 women with breast cancer and 108,411 without.

“Williams Textbook of Endocrinology” by Henry Kronenberg, Shlomo Melmed, Kenneth S. Polonsky, P. Reed Larsen
from Williams Textbook of Endocrinology
by Henry Kronenberg, Shlomo Melmed, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2007

Mutations in certain known genes such as BRCA1 and BRCA2, which are also a risk factor for ovarian cancer, account for less than 10 percent of breast cancers.

“Diseases and Disorders” by Marshall Cavendish Corporation
from Diseases and Disorders
by Marshall Cavendish Corporation
Marshall Cavendish, 2007

Acute myeloid leukemia after adjuvant breast cancer therapy in older women: understanding risk.J Clin Oncol.

“Clinical Trials: Study Design, Endpoints and Biomarkers, Drug Safety, and FDA and ICH Guidelines” by Tom Brody
from Clinical Trials: Study Design, Endpoints and Biomarkers, Drug Safety, and FDA and ICH Guidelines
by Tom Brody
Elsevier Science, 2011

Approximately 20%to 30% of patients with breast cancer will develop systemic recurrence, and approximately 10% of patients present with metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis.

“Cancer Nursing: Principles and Practice” by Connie Henke Yarbro, Yarbro, Debra Wujcik, Barbara Holmes Gobel
from Cancer Nursing: Principles and Practice
by Connie Henke Yarbro, Yarbro, et. al.
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2010

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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