Recognizing Postpartum Depression

 

Early identification essential to treat postpartum depression | Vital Signs

Video taken from the channel: UCLA Health


 

Postpartum Depression

Video taken from the channel: Medical Centric


 

How to recognize the symptoms of postpartum depression

Video taken from the channel: Howdini


 

Postpartum Depression

Video taken from the channel: National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)


 

Recognizing Postpartum Depression (AUDIO) Laura E. Riley, MD

Video taken from the channel: ACOG


 

Postpartum Depression: What You Need to Know

Video taken from the channel: Mayo Clinic


 

“Baby Blues” or Postpartum Depression?

Video taken from the channel: National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)


Recognizing Postpartum Depression Most new moms experience the “baby blues,” but some experience something much more severe: postpartum depression. If you think you might have postpartum depression, it’s important to seek help. Beth Battaglino, RN-C, CEO of HealthyWomen.

Recognizing Postpartum Depression Postpartum depression is very different from the “baby blues,” a heightened emotional state that can hit 80% or more of new moms in the first days after the baby. PPD is a type of major depression that affects about one in 10 new mothers within the first year after childbirth. Postpartum depression has the potential to negatively impact a new mother’s health and her ability to care for and nurture her infant.

New mothers most commonly experience what. This program teaches staff to recognize the signs of postpartum depression (PPD) and demonstrates a variety of helpful treatment methods, as well as when to intervene in high-risk situations. Symptoms include: Persistent feelings of sadness, hopelessness and helplessness Inability or lack of desire to take care of yourself and/or your baby Feelings of failure as a mother, and guilt about your feelings Extreme fatigue Eating problems Insomnia Memory problems Feelings of panic. If you can’t decide whether or not to get out of bed, take a shower, change your baby’s diaper, or take her for a walk, these may be early signs of postpartum depression. You worry you won’t.

Approximately 15% of new mothers will experience what is classified as postpartum depression (PPD). Symptoms may occur a few days after delivery or sometimes as late as a year later. Women who experience postpartum depression will have alternating good days and bad days. Symptoms can be mild or severe, usually lasting for over 2 weeks.

In 700 BC Hippocrates wrote about women suffering from emotional difficulties during their postpartum period, but it was not until the 1850s that medical professionals. Recognizing postpartum depression symptoms. A woman should get as much information on postpartum depression from her doctor as she can. Asking questions about what’s normal to feel and what isn’t will help in knowing if postpartum depression is actually present.

A recent University of California, San Francisco, study reports that 10 to 20. Postpartum depression (PPD) is the term for any downswings in mood that women may suffer after giving birth. While a supportive partner and network of friends can help with normal depression, serious PPDs are hormonally induced and require a doctor’s attention.

List of related literature:

They should be able to distinguish the symptoms of depression from normal postpartum adjustment such as the blues and be able to assess their severity and impact on mother and baby.

“Oxford Textbook of Primary Medical Care” by Roger Jones (Prof.)
from Oxford Textbook of Primary Medical Care
by Roger Jones (Prof.)
Oxford University Press, 2005

• Postpartum depression must be detected as soon as possible so that treatment can begin; untreated postpartum depression may last for a year or longer.

“Kinn's The Clinical Medical Assistant E-Book: An Applied Learning Approach” by Deborah B. Proctor, Brigitte Niedzwiecki, Julie Pepper, P. Ann Weaver, Martha (Marti) Garrels, Helen Mills
from Kinn’s The Clinical Medical Assistant E-Book: An Applied Learning Approach
by Deborah B. Proctor, Brigitte Niedzwiecki, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Postpartum depression is seen during the 3 months after delivery, and diagnostic criteria are the same as for depression.

“Conn's Current Therapy 2020, E-Book” by Rick D. Kellerman, KUSM-W Medical Practice Association, David Rakel
from Conn’s Current Therapy 2020, E-Book
by Rick D. Kellerman, KUSM-W Medical Practice Association, David Rakel
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Observe for postpartum blues, which may be caused by a drop in hormonal levels and psychologic factors; if discharged early, mother and support persons should be alerted to signs and symptoms; mothers with a history of depression are more likely to have postpartum depression 16.

“Mosby's Comprehensive Review of Nursing for NCLEX-RN® Examination” by Judith S. Green, Mary Ann Hellmer Saul, Dolores F. Saxton, Patricia M. Nugent, Phyllis K. Pelikan
from Mosby’s Comprehensive Review of Nursing for NCLEX-RN® Examination
by Judith S. Green, Mary Ann Hellmer Saul, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2008

• Postpartum depression can be diagnosed a month to a year after childbirth.

“Kinn's Medical Assisting Fundamentals E-Book: Administrative and Clinical Competencies with Anatomy & Physiology” by Brigitte Niedzwiecki, Julie Pepper, P. Ann Weaver
from Kinn’s Medical Assisting Fundamentals E-Book: Administrative and Clinical Competencies with Anatomy & Physiology
by Brigitte Niedzwiecki, Julie Pepper, P. Ann Weaver
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

When it’s not postpartum blues: Recognizing postpartum depression.

“Maternity and Pediatric Nursing” by Susan Scott Ricci, Terri Kyle
from Maternity and Pediatric Nursing
by Susan Scott Ricci, Terri Kyle
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2009

Postpartum depression (PPD; previously called postnatal depression, PND) is depression in the year after birth.

“Psychiatry P. R. N” by Specialty Doctor in Learning Disabilities Sarah Stringer, Laurence Church, Roxanne Keynejad, Consultant Psychiatrist Juliet Hurn, Clinical Research Training Fellow and St4 Higher Trainee in General Adult Psychiatry Roxanne Keynejad
from Psychiatry P. R. N
by Specialty Doctor in Learning Disabilities Sarah Stringer, Laurence Church, et. al.
Oxford University Press, 2020

Postpartum depression may resemble postpartum blues at first.

“Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women's Health Nursing” by Sharon Smith Murray, MSN, RN, C, Emily Slone McKinney, MSN, RN, C
from Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women’s Health Nursing
by Sharon Smith Murray, MSN, RN, C, Emily Slone McKinney, MSN, RN, C
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2013

Postpartum depression must be differentiated from postpartum blues.

“Differential Diagnosis and Management for the Chiropractor: Protocols and Algorithms” by Thomas A. Souza
from Differential Diagnosis and Management for the Chiropractor: Protocols and Algorithms
by Thomas A. Souza
Jones & Bartlett Publishers, 2009

See page 456 for signs of postpartum depression.

“What to Expect When You're Expecting 4th Edition” by Heidi Murkoff, Sharon Mazel
from What to Expect When You’re Expecting 4th Edition
by Heidi Murkoff, Sharon Mazel
Simon & Schuster UK, 2010

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

View all posts

2 comments

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  • I had it with my first born I was always scared to leave him alone or sleep or imagine things bad could happen to him I needed sleep I needed to see family until 3 or 4 weeks of my bf helping out and going over to my parents I felt extremely better ��with my second it was less than it was before.but my 2nd born has heart defect and a lot went on before and after so it ate me alive and I started having anxiety and I still do but I try my best to control my emotions lol they’re a bit older now and more manageable but I love them so much. My second was not planned very un expected I didn’t know I was pregnant until I was close to 5 months and I had 2 miscarriages before my second child and 1 before my first born

  • Here’s my story:
    I worked up until June 13th. Then my water broke 1:30am on the 14th. Boyfriend’s mom rushed us to the hospital where they confirmed my water broke then proceeded to put me in a delivery room. I wasn’t contracting fast enough so they gave me petocin. Once the rest of my water broke it was already early afternoon of the 14th, then the unbearable contractions started and I was allowed an epidural. Evening came and I was only 6cm dilated. I was feeling numb, shaky, and nauseous. Drinking water was hard, as a result I was dehydrated. around midnight I was 8cm. The next morning I was checked by my doctor at 6 something in the morning. I was 9 and a half centimeters dilated but my baby’s head wasn’t all the way down. Had to get a c-section at 7am. My beautiful daughter was born at 7:40am. I was fine for a few days emotionally despite already losing sleep. I used to open a lot during the pregnancy so lost sleep wasn’t a big deal to me. The depression kicked in when I began to have trouble nursing her. She has nipple confusion so I ended up crying a lot and blamed myself. Nursing her was the one thing that made me feel useful to her since I’m unable to do much right now. So I pump to feed her, but it hurts me knowing she won’t eat directly off me because of the early introduction of the binky. I know I shouldn’t beat myself up over it, but just typing this out now the tears r coming and I’m shaking so much. I sincerely can’t wait until I can do more so I can do more for her