Racial and Ethnic Gaps Stay in Sudden Infant Deaths

 

Discrimination and Disparities with Thomas Sowell

Video taken from the channel: Hoover Institution


 

Infant mortality rate higher for black mothers than any other race

Video taken from the channel: CBS News


 

Why are black mothers and infants far more likely to die in U.S. from pregnancy-related causes?

Video taken from the channel: PBS NewsHour


 

Sudden Unexpected Infant Death Syndrome: Statistics for Concern

Video taken from the channel: Professor LaMarr


 

America’s Maternal Nightmare | Dr. Monique Rainford | TEDxWilmington

Video taken from the channel: TEDx Talks


 

Sudden Infant Death syndrome, Causes and Prevention

Video taken from the channel: Medical Centric


 

Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, pathology

Video taken from the channel: Osmosis


MONDAY, May 15, 2017 (HealthDay News)—Fewer U.S. babies are dying from SIDS, but certain minorities remain at greater risk, a new study finds. Researchers who tracked cases of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) from 1995 through 2013 found that American Indian/Alaska Natives and blacks had double the rate in 2013 compared to whites. MONDAY, May 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) Fewer U.S. babies are dying from SIDS, but certain minorities remain at greater risk, a new study finds. Researchers who tracked cases of Sudden Infant. Immediately after the 1994 Back-to-Sleep campaign, sudden unexpected infant death (SUID) rates decreased dramatically, but they have remained relatively stable (93.4 per 100 000 live births) since 2000.

In this study, we examined trends in SUID rates and disparities by race/ethnicity since the Back-to-Sleep campaign. Significant Racial, Ethnic Gaps Still Remain Despite Efforts To Broadly Reduce Sudden Infant Deaths It’s not clear why American Indian and Alaska Native infants experience a higher rate of SIDS. American Indians and Alaska Natives had a rate of 177.6 sudden unexplained infant deaths per 100,000 live births in 2013 (down from 237.5 per 100,000 in 1995) compared with 172.4 for non-Hispanic blacks (down from 203), 84.5 for non-Hispanic whites (down from 93), 49.3 for Hispanics (down from 62.7) and 28.3 for Asians and Pacific Islanders (down from 59.3). American Indian and Alaska Native families are much more likely to have an infant die suddenly and unexpectedly, and that risk has remained higher than in other ethnic groups since public health. Nearly two-thirds of infant deaths occur during the first month after birth, often from congenital abnormalities and complications from preterm births.8Preterm birth is a significant contributor to.

Infographic: Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Pregnancy-Related Deaths — United States, 2007–2016 Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options Skip directly to A-Z link Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Actual and predicted infant mortality rate gaps are shown in Figure 1. The overall actual infant mortality rate of whites in our sample was 5.35 per 1,000 live births. Three groups had a substantially higher rate: blacks at 12.35, Native Americans at 8.31, and Puerto Ricans at 7.61.

Deaths due to SIDS accounted for the largest proportion of SUID for most racial/ethnic groups, ranging from 39% of SUID among non-Hispanic black infants to 44% of SUID among American Indian/Alaska Native infants and non-Hispanic white infants.

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Hence, the size of gap between black and white infant mortality rates has remained relatively constant, even though infant deaths from both racial groups have fallen.

“Medical Sociology” by William C. Cockerham
from Medical Sociology
by William C. Cockerham
Taylor & Francis, 2015

Hence, the size of the gap between black and white infant mortality rates has remained relatively constant, even though infant deaths from both racial groups have significantly decreased over the years.

“Medical Sociology” by William C. Cockerham
from Medical Sociology
by William C. Cockerham
Taylor & Francis, 2017

While there have been dramatic decreases in infant mortality rates for whites, ethnic minority groups have not experienced similar decreases.

“Policy and Politics in Nursing and Healthcare Revised Reprint E-Book” by Diana J. Mason, Judith K. Leavitt, Mary W. Chaffee
from Policy and Politics in Nursing and Healthcare Revised Reprint E-Book
by Diana J. Mason, Judith K. Leavitt, Mary W. Chaffee
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2013

In recent years, this ethnic and racial disparity has widened because the rate of decline in infant mortality has been higher among white infants than among African-American infants.

“Fanaroff and Martin's Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine: Diseases of the Fetus and Infant” by Richard J. Martin, Avroy A. Fanaroff, Michele C. Walsh
from Fanaroff and Martin’s Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine: Diseases of the Fetus and Infant
by Richard J. Martin, Avroy A. Fanaroff, Michele C. Walsh
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

There remains a significant racial disparity in the incidence of extreme preterm birth, with the African-American ELBW birth rate being nearly double that of the Hispanic and non-Hispanic white populations.

“Avery's Diseases of the Newborn E-Book” by Christine A. Gleason, Sandra E Juul
from Avery’s Diseases of the Newborn E-Book
by Christine A. Gleason, Sandra E Juul
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

Infant mortality rates for Hispanics and Asian–Pacific Islanders have decreased dramatically during the past 2 decades (Heron, Sutton, Xu, et al, 2010).

“Wong's Nursing Care of Infants and Children Multimedia Enhanced Version” by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson, Donna L. Wong, Annette Baker, R.N., Patrick Barrera, Debbie Fraser Askin
from Wong’s Nursing Care of Infants and Children Multimedia Enhanced Version
by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson, et. al.
Mosby/Elsevier, 2013

According to the latest Healthy People 2010 progress report, racial and ethnic disparities persist as a significant problem, and Black women continue to have the highest maternal death rate and the highest infant mortality rate (United States Department of Health and Human Services, 2007).

“Nursing Research” by Patricia Munhall
from Nursing Research
by Patricia Munhall
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2012

Although infant deaths occur more frequently among low-income groups of all race/ethnicities, these birth outcome disparities by race/ ethnicity are found also in blacks with higher socioeconomic status (SES).

“Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics E-Book” by Robert M. Kliegman, Joseph St. Geme
from Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics E-Book
by Robert M. Kliegman, Joseph St. Geme
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Although the infant mortality of all racial groups increased slightly between 2001 and 2002, the gap has remained constant, with the infant mortality rate expressed as a ratio of African-American to Caucasian deaths being relatively unchanged (Hamilton, Hoyert, Martin, et al., 2013).

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from Maternal Child Nursing Care
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U.S. infant mortality rates have decreased since 2005 for the overall population and within each racial and ethnic group; however, sharp racial and ethnic disparities persist.

“Communities in Action: Pathways to Health Equity” by National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Health and Medicine Division, Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice, Committee on Community-Based Solutions to Promote Health Equity in the United States, Alina Baciu, Yamrot Negussie, Amy Geller, James N. Weinstein
from Communities in Action: Pathways to Health Equity
by National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Health and Medicine Division, et. al.
National Academies Press, 2017

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
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  • I’d differ with Mr Sowell in that natural genius always finds a way. Intellectualism is often just another crutch, or conformity anxiety.

  • The remedy for this problem is a very simple one? That is that, American Black women should become more of a Virtuous woman ya-think? This woman-type, thanks to Feminism mind-you, for she knows not, and haven’t a clue to the Powers of the Virtuous woman in the slightest, especially as it pertains to her Over-all health that’s contained within the Powers of the Virtuous woman, no? As the saying goes, “You Can’t Teach What You Don’t Know,” right? With that, why won’t there-be a Study or Research done in support of the Virtuous woman, its Lifestyle and All Of Its Benefits? Well we all know that’s, “To Much Like Right” and therefore Shall Never-be, no?

  • I’ve heard physicians with suspicions that many if not most cases of SIDS are truthfully infanticide. The risk factors and increases during times of alcohol consumption seem to indicate that is a possibility. What is your take on that theory?

  • sudden infant death syndrome is caused by a mother who is tired from the baby’s crying so she holds the baby a little too tight and the cries stop.

  • Isn’t it followed up sfter BBS/Blue Baby Symdrome which is a combination of Cyanosis and Hypoxia preterm birth defect which can lead to Hypotonia,early on set Cardiovascular disease,asthma,nerve dqmage and other peripheral Neurological disorders in your later life