Questions you should ask Your Doctor About Banking Amniotic Fluid

 

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How is amniotic fluid collected and stored?Will collecting amniotic fluid for banking affect my amniocentesis procedure or the test results?Is there any danger to my baby or me or drawback Questions to Ask Your Health Care Professional About Banking Amniotic Fluid | HealthyWomen. Collecting Your Amniotic Fluid Genetic amniocentesis is a prenatal test that removes a small amount of amniotic fluid from the sac around your baby to test for birth defects and chromosome problems. To remove the fluid for testing, your health care professional will insert a thin needle through your belly and uterus, using ultrasound imaging as. Questions to Ask Your Health Care Professional About Banking Amniotic Fluid 1. What are the potential benefits of storing amniotic fluid?

2. How is amniotic fluid collected and stored? 3. Will collecting amniotic fluid for banking affect my amniocentesis procedure or the test results? 4.

Preserving and storing your baby’s amniotic fluid stem cells could potentially offer your child, and other members of your immediate family, an opportunity to benefit from these advances in medical treatments. For more information, speak with your health care professional so that you may make an educated decision about banking amniotic fluid. If you have decided to have an amniocentesis, collecting amniotic fluid for banking during your procedure is easy.

Banking your fluid will not change the prenatal testing procedure in any way and will not have any impact on the tests results. Many health care professionals typically withdraw more fluid than necessary for the prenatal test. These amounts are then added up. If your AFI is less than 5 centimeters, you have oligohydramnios. The MPV measures the deepest area of your uterus to check the amniotic fluid level.

If your MPV is less than 2 centimeters, you have oligohydramnios. Ask your health provider if you have questions. Amniotic fluid volume assessment is a test all women get during pregnancy. It’s a standard way of checking on your baby’s health.

Your body starts producing amniotic fluid super early — about 12 days after conception. For the first half of pregnancy, amniotic fluid is made up of water from your body. In the early weeks of pregnancy, the amniotic fluid is mostly water that comes from your body.

After about 20 weeks of pregnancy, your baby’s urine makes up most of the fluid. Amniotic fluid also contains nutrients, hormones (chemicals made by the body) and antibodies (cells. Too little amniotic fluid is known as oligohydramnios.

This condition may occur with late pregnancies, ruptured membranes, placental dysfunction, or fetal abnormalities. Abnormal amounts of amniotic fluid may cause the health care provider to watch the pregnancy more carefully. Removing a sample of the fluid through amniocentesis can provide.

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Urinary: Ask about problems in the area such as cystitis, urinary tract infections, problems with urination, kidney disease, water retention.

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Other problems that you should ask your pregnant patient about include cardiac disorders, respiratory disorders, such as tuberculosis, sexually transmitted disorders, phlebitis, epilepsy, urinary tract infections, and gallbladder disorders.

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Inquire about any problems with the current pregnancy or prior pregnancies, including gestational diabetes, gestation hypertension, or preeclampsia.

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Using sensitivity in posing questions, ask about the biological mother’s use of alcohol, drugs, or cigarettes and any radiographs taken during pregnancy.

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Ask the woman about any symptoms of preterm labor, such as low back pain, uterine contractions, and increased pelvic pressure and vaginal discharge, and report them immediately.

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Four important questions to consider when determining resuscitation risk factors include: what is the expected gestational age of the infant, is the amniotic fluid clear, how many babies are expected, and does the mother know of any additional risk factors that she has discussed with her obstetrician.

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For example, “Can you tell me about any infections (or problems) you have had during this pregnancy?”

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Explain how to manage medical conditions that can exist during pregnancy, including hypertension complicating 8.

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Ask about change in voice (nasal voice), dysphagia, breathlessness, bladder fullness, constipation, or incontinence of urine or stool.

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Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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