Questions you should ask Following a Cancer Of The Breast Diagnosis

 

Questions to Ask After a Breast Biopsy

Video taken from the channel: Breast Cancer Answers®


 

Breast Cancer Q & A: What to Ask Your Doctor

Video taken from the channel: HealthONE


 

Questions You Should Ask After Receiving a Cancer Diagnosis The Doctors

Video taken from the channel: The Doctors


 

Ask the Expert: Questions About Breast Cancer Surgery

Video taken from the channel: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute


 

Questions to Ask After Your Breast Cancer Surgery

httpv://youtu.be/GyFIcKkm_c?rel=0&modestbranding=1

Video taken from the channel: Breast Cancer Answers®


 

Questions Breast Cancer Patients Should Ask Their Oncologist

Video taken from the channel: Breast Cancer Answers®


 

Questions to ask after Breast Cancer Diagnosis

Video taken from the channel: Pink Lotus Power Up


When you’re told you have breast cancer. Exactly what type of breast cancer do I have? How big is the cancer?

Where exactly is it? Has the cancer spread to my lymph nodes or other organs? What’s the stage of the cancer?

What does that mean? Will I need any other tests. 11 Important Questions to Ask After a Breast Cancer Diagnosis 11 Important Questions to Ask After a Breast Cancer Diagnosis Navigating life after a breast cancer diagnosis can be challenging, but knowing the right questions to ask your care team can be a big help. After you receive a breast cancer diagnosis, your doctor will order various diagnostic tests that provide important details about your type and stage of breast cancer. *We are here to support you.

If you are applying for financial assistance, all correspondence must. They should also order a biopsy, which will remove a core tissue sample of the lump for testing in a laboratory; biopsy is the only definitive method for making a breast cancer diagnosis, so if the mammogram and/or ultrasound indicate you possibly have a cancerous mass, this will be the final step. Doctors understand that a breast cancer diagnosis is much more than tumors and treatment options.

It can be very emotional and many people need help dealing with it. Two examples of websites that can connect you with support services are Susan G. Komen and CancerCare. Is this breast cancer invasive, non-invasive, or both invasive and non-invasive? Is the breast cancer more aggressive or less aggressive? Are the surgical margins negative or positive? Are there any cancer cells present in lymph channels or blood vessels?

What do the hormone receptor tests show?No matter which type of cancer patient you are, asking your health care team the right questions about your disease and cancer treatment can play an important part in managing your care. I recommend the following questions for newly diagnosed cancer patients.

Being diagnosed with cancer or any major illness is overwhelming and confusing. You don’t know what questions to ask when you walk into a doctor’s office. Here are seven questions to ask. Questions to ask your breast surgeon after your first surgery. What type of breast cancer do I have?

What is the size of the tumor? What is the grade and stage of this disease? What are my biomarkers?

What do these mean? What are the chances that the breast cancer will return? Can you explain my pathology report (laboratory test results) to me?Try the links below to see examples of questions you may want to ask your doctor.

You should use the questions that fit your situation, adding your own questions and skipping any that don’t apply. Questions to Ask about Your Diagnosis; Questions to Ask about Your Treatment; Questions to Ask.

List of related literature:

Ask about a prior history of cancer, no matter how remote; some malignancies such as breast cancer may recur more than 15 years after original treatment.

“Chapman's Comprehensive Orthopaedic Surgery: Five Volume Set” by Michael W Chapman, Michelle A James
from Chapman’s Comprehensive Orthopaedic Surgery: Five Volume Set
by Michael W Chapman, Michelle A James
Jaypee Brothers,Medical Publishers Pvt. Limited, 2019

Ask the client, ‘Since your diagnosis and treatment of cancer, what physical changes or symptoms have you had?’ and ‘Tell me how these changes affect you now’.

“Potter & Perry's Fundamentals of Nursing AUS Version E-Book” by Jackie Crisp, Catherine Taylor, Clint Douglas, Geraldine Rebeiro
from Potter & Perry’s Fundamentals of Nursing AUS Version E-Book
by Jackie Crisp, Catherine Taylor, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

Talk with a woman who has had breast cancer about her feelings upon learning the diagnosis and during the wait between diagnosis and treatment.

“Study Guide for Maternal-Child Nursing E-Book” by Emily Slone McKinney, Sharon Smith Murray
from Study Guide for Maternal-Child Nursing E-Book
by Emily Slone McKinney, Sharon Smith Murray
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2014

A. What tests should be done to confirm the presence or absence of breast cancer?

“Porth's Pathophysiology: Concepts of Altered Health States” by Sheila Grossman
from Porth’s Pathophysiology: Concepts of Altered Health States
by Sheila Grossman
Wolters Kluwer Health, 2013

As you explore the patient’s history of cancer and the treatment received in the past, ask questions such as, “How did that come about?” vs. why or yes/no questions.

“Fundamentals of Nursing E-Book” by Patricia A. Potter, Anne Griffin Perry, Patricia Stockert, Amy Hall
from Fundamentals of Nursing E-Book
by Patricia A. Potter, Anne Griffin Perry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

In addition to breast symptoms, the history should include questions concerning changes in general health and questions specifically relating to symptoms possibly due to metastases (e.g., bone pain, respiratory complaints, or change in neurological status).

“Gunderson & Tepper’s Clinical Radiation Oncology, E-Book” by Joel E. Tepper
from Gunderson & Tepper’s Clinical Radiation Oncology, E-Book
by Joel E. Tepper
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

If patient reports a breast mass, ask about length of time since she first noticed the lump.

“Potter and Perry's Fundamentals of Nursing: Second South Asia Edition E-Book” by Sharma Suresh
from Potter and Perry’s Fundamentals of Nursing: Second South Asia Edition E-Book
by Sharma Suresh
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

Shocked and afraid upon learning that you have breast cancer, Chapter 4 answers all those nagging questions about the various types of breast cancer, whether it’s remained where it started or invaded other cells, and how these factors affect your treatment options and projected outcome.

“Breast Cancer For Dummies” by Ronit Elk, Monica Morrow
from Breast Cancer For Dummies
by Ronit Elk, Monica Morrow
Wiley, 2011

She asks you how likely they are to be a recurrence of her previous breast cancer.

“Mayo Clinic Internal Medicine Board Review” by Amit K. Ghosh
from Mayo Clinic Internal Medicine Board Review
by Amit K. Ghosh
OUP USA, 2010

How have your family, friends and the healthcare workers helped you in coping and adapting to your diagnosis of leukaemia?’

“Watson's Clinical Nursing and Related Sciences E-Book” by Mike Walsh, Alison Crumbie, Anna Walsh, Angela McKeane
from Watson’s Clinical Nursing and Related Sciences E-Book
by Mike Walsh, Alison Crumbie, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2007

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • Questions Breast Cancer Patients Should Ask Their Oncologist

    Cancer is a serious and complicated disease. Dr. Jiaxin Niu shares some advice on what newly diagnosed breast cancer patients should ask their medical oncologists. 

    Watch the video below to find out.

    #BreastCancer   #Cancer  

  • Excellent Video Post-Biopsy! I just had my biopsy this morning and while I’m waiting for the result… I have a basis for some solid research re: markers, additional tests and I would not have known to ask about the multidisciplinary team! A little empowerment goes a long way… Thank you!