Presenting Particular Foods to Babies Earlier May Really Cut Allergy Risk

 

Introducing peanut-containing foods to prevent peanut allergy

Video taken from the channel: American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology


 

Peanut-allergy prevention in infants Dr. Maria Garcia-Lloret | UCLA Mattel Children’s Hospital

Video taken from the channel: UCLA Health


 

Preventing Food Allergies: Recommendations for Pregnancy and Infancy

Video taken from the channel: Kids With Food Allergies, a division of AAFA


 

5 foods to feed your children that may help them avoid allergies

Video taken from the channel: PBS NewsHour


 

Should parents feed infants allergenic foods earlier to prevent allergies?

Video taken from the channel: Global News


 

Children’s Allergy: 3 Tips for new parents to help prevent allergies from developing

Video taken from the channel: Telethon Kids Institute


 

Updated guidance on the early introduction of allergens to prevent the development of food allergies

Video taken from the channel: Food Allergy Canada


The new report highlights new studies that have shown that introducing these foods early can help prevent allergies. The report suggests introducing peanut protein as early as 4 months to 6 months. The researchers found that early introduction of any of the allergic foods was linked to a lower risk of sensitization for that food. Giving a child egg before age 1 also reduced the odds of sensitization to any of the three tested foods, the study found. The most recent research did show that introducing eggs and peanut butter to infants between 4 to 11 months old decreased the risk of allergies to those two foods by anywhere from 40 to 70%.

Notice I said “peanut butter,” you do not want to be giving actual peanuts which are choking hazards to young babies. Same goes for no chunky peanut butter. The researchers found that early introduction was linked to a lower risk of sensitization for that food. Giving a child egg before age 1 also reduced the odds of sensitization to any of the three.

The NIH also recommended that babies with mild or moderate eczema have peanuts incorporated into their diets at around 6 months, while those who show no allergy risk can have peanuts introduced to. The researchers found that early introduction of any of the allergic foods was linked to a lower risk of sensitization for that food. Giving a child egg before age 1 also reduced the odds of sensitization to any of the three tested foods, the study found.

The American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI) says that highly allergic foods including dairy products, egg, soy, wheat, peanut and tree nuts (in the form of powder or butter. In addition to exclusive breastfeeding and avoidance of solid foods for six months, the ACAAI committee recommended that: Staple foods, such as fruits, vegetables, meats, soy, and cereal. Recent research has found that babies who are at a higher risk of food allergy may benefit from earlier introduction of egg and then peanut to prevent allergies to these foods developing. A discussion with a health professional (GP/Health Visitor/Dietitian) for further.

These foods include infant cereals, meat or other proteins, fruits, vegetables, grains, yogurts and cheeses, and more. If your child is eating infant cereals, it is important to offer a variety of fortified infant cereals such as oat, barley, and multi-grain instead of only rice cereal.

List of related literature:

There is also no evidence to support the theory that avoiding certain foods during this time will prevent allergies in children (Chan, Cummings, & CPS, Community Paediatrics Committee, 2013/2016).

“Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book” by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Lisa Keenan-Lindsay, David Wilson, Cheryl A. Sams
from Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book
by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

Lowered Risk of Allergy Introducing complementary foods too early may increase the risk of food allergy in the infant.

“Counseling the Nursing Mother” by Judith Lauwers, Anna Swisher
from Counseling the Nursing Mother
by Judith Lauwers, Anna Swisher
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2010

Many pediatricians recommend holding off on certain foods, because studies have shown allergies may be caused by introducing them too soon, causing the body to prematurely develop antibodies against them.

“Your Baby's First Year For Dummies” by James Gaylord, Michelle Hagen
from Your Baby’s First Year For Dummies
by James Gaylord, Michelle Hagen
Wiley, 2011

Introducing complementary foods too early may increase the risk of food allergy in the infant.

“Counseling the Nursing Mother” by Judith Lauwers, Anna Swisher
from Counseling the Nursing Mother
by Judith Lauwers, Anna Swisher
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2015

Allergy experts now say that for infants with no family history of food allergy, there is no reason to delay introducing these foods, and in fact introducing these foods before the infant’s first birthday may have protective effects against developing food allergies later in life (Fleischer et al, 2013).

“Krause and Mahan’s Food and the Nutrition Care Process E-Book” by Janice L Raymond, Kelly Morrow
from Krause and Mahan’s Food and the Nutrition Care Process E-Book
by Janice L Raymond, Kelly Morrow
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2020

However, for infants who are at high risk for food allergy (e.g., children with AD and multiple food allergies), it is recommended that they avoid eggs, peanuts, tree nuts, fish, and shellfish in the first 3 years, unless there are major issues such as nutrition or social hindrance.

“Conn's Current Therapy 2015 E-Book” by Edward T. Bope, Rick D. Kellerman
from Conn’s Current Therapy 2015 E-Book
by Edward T. Bope, Rick D. Kellerman
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2014

New recommendations from the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAA) state that infants can safely tolerate highly allergenic foods, such as cow milk, egg, peanuts and tree nuts, soy, wheat, fish, and shellfish, when they are as young as 4 months.

“Breastfeeding and Human Lactation” by Karen Wambach, Jan Riordan
from Breastfeeding and Human Lactation
by Karen Wambach, Jan Riordan
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2016

Indeed, the opposite is probably true and delayed introduction of these foods actually increases the risk of allergy.

“Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics, 2-Volume Set” by Robert M. Kliegman, MD, Bonita F. Stanton, MD, Joseph St. Geme, MD, Nina F Schor, MD, PhD
from Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics, 2-Volume Set
by Robert M. Kliegman, MD, Bonita F. Stanton, MD, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

Now that solid foods tend to be introduced from six months—later than before—allergic reactions to foods in young infants is not seen as often as was previously the case.

“Top 100 Baby Purees: 100 Quick and Easy Meals for a Healthy and Happy B” by Annabel Karmel
from Top 100 Baby Purees: 100 Quick and Easy Meals for a Healthy and Happy B
by Annabel Karmel
Atria Books, 2009

Food allergy guidelines based on current research have shown that early introduction of allergenic foods, such as strained peanuts or egg powder, before 11 months of age may prevent the development of childhood allergies in high-risk children (Togias, 2017).

“Introduction to Maternity and Pediatric Nursing E-Book” by Gloria Leifer
from Introduction to Maternity and Pediatric Nursing E-Book
by Gloria Leifer
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • Great info because my 4 year old son was one of those babies. He has had a life-threatening peanut allergy since birth. He is so allergic to peanut that he was even reacting to my breast milk every time I nursed him because he was reacting to the peanut proteins that passed from my milk to him. And he had SEVERE eczema all over his body that would weep. He has had 20+ food allergies, most of the foods to which he is allergic are high allergies for him. He just had more blood testing and I’ll find out the results for if he has outgrown anything soon. I’m sure hoping because food allergies like this are really tough to manage. ��

  • Everyone says to introduce foods when baby can sit unassisted. What does that mean? Most babies can’t sit alone straight up before 6, 7 months.