Prescription Medication Abuse May Increase Teens’ Chance of THIS

 

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MONDAY, Dec. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News)—Teens who abuse prescription drugs such as narcotic painkillers are more likely to have sex or to participate in risky sexual behaviors, a new study suggests. Prescription Drug Abuse May Increase Teens’ Risk of THIS | HealthyWomen. blured, interior of drugstore for background Suicide is a leading cause of death for teens worldwide, and the odds of suicide attempts may be higher when adolescents abuse prescription drugs. Opioid abuse can lead to vomiting, mood changes, decrease in ability to think (cognitive function), and even decreased respiratory function, coma, or death.

This risk is higher when prescription drugs like opioids are taken with other substances like alcohol, antihistamines, and CNS depressants. CNS depressant abuse is risky too. Injection drug use places youth at direct risk for HIV, and drug use broadly places youth at risk of overdose. 2; Youth opioid use is directly linked to sexual risk behaviors.

2; Students who report ever using prescription drugs without a doctor’s prescription are more likely than other students to have been the victim of physical or sexual dating violence. 4. Young people are abusing prescription drugs at alarming rates. These drugs act on the same brain systems as illegal drugs and pose similar risks for dangerous health consequences, including later addiction.

As with any type of mind-altering drug, prescription drug misuse and abuse can affect judgment and inhibition, putting adolescents at heightened risk for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections, misusing other kinds of drugs, and engaging in additional risky behaviors. Risk factors can influence drug abuse in several ways. The more risks a child is exposed to, the more likely the child will abuse drugs.

Some risk factors may be more powerful than others at certain stages in development, such as peer pressure during the teenage years; just as some protective factors, such as a strong parent-child bond, can have a greater impact on reducing risks during the. Teenagers who have a tendency to seek thrills and adrenaline rushes may be at higher risk of abusing drugs due to the “high” feeling that is achieved from early substance use. While everyone enjoys a rush of feel-good chemicals from appropriate sources, some teens get a feeling from drugs that causes them to continue their use despite negative consequences. Someone misusing prescription drugs may overload their system or put themselves at risk for dangerous drug interactions that can cause seizures, coma, or even death. Opioid abuse can lead to vomiting, mood changes, decrease in ability to think (cognitive function), and even decreased respiratory function, coma, or death.

This risk is higher when prescription drugs like opioids are taken with other substances like alcohol, antihistamines, and CNS depressants. CNS depressant abuse is risky too.

List of related literature:

Extensive research on the risk and protective factors associated with adolescent drug use has been completed elsewhere (e.g., Hawkins et al.

“Encyclopedia of Adolescence” by Roger J.R. Levesque
from Encyclopedia of Adolescence
by Roger J.R. Levesque
Springer New York, 2014

“The authors of this study suggest that these trends may reflect ‘generational forgetting’ of the dangers of these drugs, leaving the newer cohorts vulnerable to a resurgence of use” (Center for Substance Abuse Research [CESAR] 2007, p. 7).

“Drugs and Society” by Hanson, Peter J. Venturelli, Annette E. Fleckenstein
from Drugs and Society
by Hanson, Peter J. Venturelli, Annette E. Fleckenstein
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2017

Nevertheless, older adults are at greater risk of abusing prescription drugs than are adolescents and young adults (Simoni-Wastila & Strickler, 2004).

“Essential Concepts for Healthy Living” by Sandra Alters, Wendy Schiff
from Essential Concepts for Healthy Living
by Sandra Alters, Wendy Schiff
Jones and Bartlett Publishers, 2005

Solutions to this problem can potentially begin at the regulatory level, by more strictly regulating the availability of risky medications to geriatric patients; by regulating drug advertisements and internet sales; and by stricter regulations on switching more risky medications to OTC status.

“Contemporary Perspectives on Ageism” by Liat Ayalon, Clemens Tesch-Römer
from Contemporary Perspectives on Ageism
by Liat Ayalon, Clemens Tesch-Römer
Springer International Publishing, 2018

They found that stimulant treatment increased the risk of subsequent drug use in young adults.

“Handbook of Resilience in Children” by Sam Goldstein, Robert B. Brooks
from Handbook of Resilience in Children
by Sam Goldstein, Robert B. Brooks
Springer US, 2012

Since regular drug taking starts less often in adulthood than in adolescence, and the developing brain is likely to be more vulnerable to the deleterious effects of Substance misuse, the limitation of drug taking among adolescents is an important aim.

“Shorter Oxford Textbook of Psychiatry” by Paul J. Harrison, Philip Cowen, Tom Burns, Mina Fazel
from Shorter Oxford Textbook of Psychiatry
by Paul J. Harrison, Philip Cowen, et. al.
Oxford University Press, 2017

Education to prevent adverse drug reactions may be required because of the prevalence of multiple drug therapies.7 Older adults may also be coping with end-of-life issues and are in need of information to make informed decisions.

“Priorities in Critical Care Nursing E-Book” by Linda D. Urden, Kathleen M. Stacy, Mary E. Lough
from Priorities in Critical Care Nursing E-Book
by Linda D. Urden, Kathleen M. Stacy, Mary E. Lough
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Abuse of prescription drugs is up 300 percent among youths.

“Successful Coaching” by Rainer Martens
from Successful Coaching
by Rainer Martens
Human Kinetics, Incorporated, 2012

These harms include withdrawal symptoms and an increase in suicidality in children and teenagers.

“Medical Nihilism” by Jacob Stegenga
from Medical Nihilism
by Jacob Stegenga
Oxford University Press, 2018

One third of all new prescription drug abusers are teenagers, and diverted pharmaceuticals are now the most frequently abused drugs for 12 to 13 year-olds.

“Forbidden Drugs” by Philip Robson
from Forbidden Drugs
by Philip Robson
OUP Oxford, 2009

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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2 comments

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  • You can get addicted to drugs even when you follow a doctors recommendation. This is what happens when doctors hand out long-term prescriptions for opiates and benzos

  • I only liked one thing the environmental factor. PLACES WHERE AVAILABILITY is in HUGE SCALE specially in this so called MODERN & POP CULTURE youth from ALL CLASSES run to such places as a fun or to show people how cool they are how popular they are how powerful they are simply how MODERN TRENDY POP CULTURED they are.

    MODERN MAINSTREAM POP CULTURE & MEDIA ALSO A HUGE FACTOR HERE WHEN IT COMES ABOUT SUBSTANCE ABUSE.