Polypharmacy An Entirely Modern Epidemic

 

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Polypharmacy

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The problem of people taking multiple medications is called polypharmacy. Many people and their caregivers are aware of the problem, but, too often, their health care professionals are not If you google the keywords, taking too many medications, chances are. Polypharmacy.

A Totally Modern Epidemic. If you google the keywords, taking too many medications, chances are you will come across a term called Polypharmacy. The word has been used for a long time to describe the problem of patients are taking multiple medications. Although the elderly are most likely to “suffer” from polypharmacy, people with psychiatric conditions and many other chronic.

Medication Overload: America’s Other Drug Problem, a report released in April 2019 by the Lown Institute, chronicles the epidemic of polypharmacy in. “And as this edition shows, we know more than ever about the current state of polypharmacy, a modern epidemic which has the potential to blight the lives of millions of older people. Yet progress is slow,” Goodwin and Kaskie state. Societies should be measured by the way their most vulnerable citizens are treated.

Similar to the international effort required to deal with an epidemic, the International Group for Reducing Inappropriate Medication Use and Polypharmacy (IGRIMUP) was founded to combat the iatrogenic epidemic of inappropriate medication use and polypharmacy. Polypharmacy is a growing public health problem which could be greatly reduced by the integration of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) into health care systems. Defined as the use of five or more drugs at one time, polypharmacy affects up to 40% of US seniors, while 12% of those over age 65 take ten or more daily drugs. Nevertheless, successful reduction of ‘the epidemic’ has tremendous, potentially beneficial economic consequences representing a triple win–win game: improved health and QoL for millions, and reduced costs of drugs, superfluous evaluations and hospitalizations. 79 Health economists may evaluate the impact of de-prescribing an average of 6–7 drugs in older adults with polypharmacy, on health expenditures.

The problem of polypharmacy, as the multitude of drugs is called, and the side effects they cause is largely a result of our fragmented health care system, rushed doctor visits, and direct. Multiple studies point to the dangers of polypharmacy use among older adults, including potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs), anticholinergic burden, drug–drug interaction-related adverse drug reactions. 26 – 30 The prevalence of polypharmacy use and inappropriate prescribing in the elderly is a global phenomenon reported in multiple countries. 4, 31, 32 The consequential. Struggle with music licensing for video, film or YouTube?

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List of related literature:

One of the more dire prophecies of the 21st century is that the world, now accustomed to global travel and interaction, will be struck by a particularly virulent form of influenza or infections (such as tuberculosis or other bacillary diseases) that are resistant to drug treatments.

“Africa 2019-2020” by Francis Wiafe-Amoako
from Africa 2019-2020
by Francis Wiafe-Amoako
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2019

Influenza A may also change abruptly by ‘antigenic shift’ leading to the circulation of a new subtype to which there is little existing population immunity and causing a major pandemic, usually with severe disease in all ages: these have occurred in 1918 (causing 20–40 million deaths worldwide), 1957 and 1968.

“Communicable Disease Control and Health Protection Handbook” by Jeremy Hawker, Norman Begg, Iain Blair, Ralf Reintjes, Julius Weinberg, Karl Ekdahl
from Communicable Disease Control and Health Protection Handbook
by Jeremy Hawker, Norman Begg, et. al.
Wiley, 2012

The type and magnitude of the epidemic was unlike anything the Marians had encountered before.

“Anthropology and Epidemiology: Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Study of Health and Disease” by C. Janes, R. Stall, S.M. Gifford
from Anthropology and Epidemiology: Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Study of Health and Disease
by C. Janes, R. Stall, S.M. Gifford
Springer Netherlands, 1986

Eradication of measles is feasible in the second decade of this century, if a two-dose policy is used and sustained with high priority globally, supplemented by catch-up campaigns for older children and young adults, and outbreak control.

“The New Public Health” by Theodore H. Tulchinsky, Elena A. Varavikova
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Swenson (1988) suggests the outbreaks of the influenza epidemics occurring in the US and Western Europe in the twentieth century resulted initially in high levels of denial, which progressed to blame, among the western countries.

“Cambridge Handbook of Psychology, Health and Medicine” by Andrew Baum, Stanton Newman, John Weinman, Robert West, Chris McManus
from Cambridge Handbook of Psychology, Health and Medicine
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In industrialized countries, epidemics still occur from time to time, and clinical severity increases with age, leading to the paradoxical effect of greater morbidity and mortality in older age groups and increasing economic costs (14).

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Pandemics, on the other hand, spread globally and may persist through months, years, or decades; these include such historic scourges as bubonic plague in the Middle Ages, influenza in 1918 and 1919, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in the 20th and 21st centuries.

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Epidemic bacterial meningitis, for reasons that remain unexplained, has virtually ceased to be a public health problem in industrialized countries since World War II, although small clusters of cases or hyperendemic disease can still be a vexing problem.

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Pandemics of disease have been uncommon in developed countries since World War II.

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Indeed, the last outbreaks in the United States in the epidemic pre-vaccine era included parents in more advantaged families whose children carried wild poliovirus into the home [305].

“Viral Infections of Humans: Epidemiology and Control” by Richard A. Kaslow, Lawrence R. Stanberry, James W. Le Duc
from Viral Infections of Humans: Epidemiology and Control
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Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
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Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
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5 comments

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  • At 69 I feel this information is very important. I take a big bag of medication everyday.
    Thank you for taking the time to help others at this time in our, Golden Years.
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  • Excellent video. I do telepsychiatry for nursing homes. My record so far is a patient wit 46 medications. I have observed that when patients enter hospice and their drugs are reduced their medical and psychiatric condition will improve. I have started to spread the word to the nurses and PCPs I work with about ‘deprescribing’ in the care of the elders. Thanks for your work.

  • This is a work of non-fiction and fiction and solely the property of the original creator(s). Any names or characters, businesses or places, events or incidents, are factual to the best of the author’s knowledge, at the time of the recording. Any resemblance to actual persons, living or dead, or actual events is purely coincidental. We do not take responsibility for decisions taken by the viewer based solely on the information provided in this virtual application. We do not take responsibility for decisions taken by the viewer based solely on the information provided in this video. ‘We’ do not take responsibility for decisions taken by the viewer based solely on the information provided in this virtual application.

  • Great information. With so many older adults taking multiple medications, it’s also important to take time to talk with the pharmacist to get answers to the questions provided in this checklist: http://livefreehomehealthcare.com/senior-safety-pharmacist/

  • My mom’s stop eating / talking in last 2 months ( up and down) she live in Manorecare rehab for 7 years, her last doctor Dr Mery Manavalan was very good with her for many years, even her last American Doctor was the best ( i forgot his name) unfortunatly this days her Dr is Mr Wood! He is most negative Dr ever i see, over 20 times i called him in emergency and leave messaged ( in 20 days).. nothing! after some arguments with Nursing station, they called him and same day he called me, without any excuse, he said i cannot visit or do anything for your mom’s except if you want order for hospital! i said Dr excuse me, but in last 3 months your her dr even one time 1 min you did not meet her!… can i switch you to Dr Ayati ( another Dr here) and he shut down the phone to me!!!!!!… I talk Dr Ayati directly he said after chrismass i come to visit her but just for one time as i cannot be her Dr!. time passed and over 10 time Ayati told me i will come next week… but 3 months passed and nothing happened by them!!!… i talk two time with this Mrs Hussain and she was so polite but refused to visit or talk!!… even for a mins…. really they need to go to first class to learn about meaning and act of responsibility. unfortunately i see a lot in this area.