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Air Pollution, Asthma and Pregnancy

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Here’s more bad news associated with climate change: Pregnant women exposed to air pollution or heat waves face a greater risk of having a preterm or. Pregnant women with asthma may be at greater risk of preterm birth when exposed to high levels of certain traffic-related air pollutants, according to a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and other institutions. The researchers observed an increased risk associated with both ongoing and short-term exposure to nitrogen oxides. Pregnant women with asthma may be at greater risk of preterm birth when exposed to high levels of certain traffic-related air pollutants, according to a study by researchers at NICHD and other institutions.

Pregnant women with asthma may be at greater risk of preterm birth when exposed to high levels of certain traffic-related air pollutants, according to a study by researchers at the National. Exposure to high levels of small particle air pollution during pregnancy was associated with a 19 percent increased risk of preterm birth. The risk was greatest when high levels of exposure occurred during the third trimester, the study found. Exposure to high levels of small particle air pollution during pregnancy was associated with a 19 percent increased risk of preterm birth. The risk was greatest when high levels of exposure occurred during the third trimester, the study found. “Although the risk increase is modest, the potential impact is robust, as all pregnant women are potentially at risk,” study author Dr.

Emily DeFranco, a physician-researcher at. Ambient ozone linked to increased risk of preterm birth and stillbirth. Exposure to air pollution in pregnancy has been associated with risk of premature, or preterm, birth by increasing toxic chemicals in the blood and causing immune system stress, which can weaken the placenta surrounding the fetus and lead to preterm birth.

Air pollution has been identified as a potential risk factor for preterm birth, but research to date has had several limitations. Nonetheless, the U.S. Institute of Medicine, based on a 2007 review of 21 published studies on air pollution and preterm birth, acknowledged.

Africa and south Asia bear a disproportionate burden of premature births, accounting for 60% of all premature births globally. That region also dominated SEI’s.

List of related literature:

Nonetheless, given the number of studies that have found significant relationships between exposures to air pollution and preterm birth, the epidemiological findings suggest that air pollution contributes to a woman’s risk for preterm birth.

“Preterm Birth: Causes, Consequences, and Prevention” by Institute of Medicine, Board on Health Sciences Policy, Committee on Understanding Premature Birth and Assuring Healthy Outcomes, Adrienne Stith Butler, Richard E. Behrman
from Preterm Birth: Causes, Consequences, and Prevention
by Institute of Medicine, Board on Health Sciences Policy, et. al.
National Academies Press, 2007

Environmental exposure to benzene and a mixture of associated traffic-related air pollution was associated with decreases in birth weight and head circumference during pregnancy and at birth (Slama et al., 2009).

“Reproductive and Developmental Toxicology” by Ramesh C. Gupta
from Reproductive and Developmental Toxicology
by Ramesh C. Gupta
Elsevier Science, 2011

Finally, some evidence suggests that air pollution may play a role in adverse birth outcomes, such as low birth weight and preterm birth.

“Urban Sprawl and Public Health: Designing, Planning, and Building for Healthy Communities” by Howard Frumkin, Lawrence Frank, Richard J. Jackson
from Urban Sprawl and Public Health: Designing, Planning, and Building for Healthy Communities
by Howard Frumkin, Lawrence Frank, Richard J. Jackson
Island Press, 2004

Women exposed to increased CO in their last 6 weeks of pregnancy have been found to experience more preterm births; in this study, CO was due to air pollution from automobile traffic (Ritz et al, 2007).

“Pediatric Primary Care E-Book” by Catherine E. Burns, Ardys M. Dunn, Margaret A. Brady, Nancy Barber Starr, Catherine G. Blosser, Dawn Lee Garzon Maaks
from Pediatric Primary Care E-Book
by Catherine E. Burns, Ardys M. Dunn, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

Air pollution may cause more health problems during pregnancy, as ciliary clearance of the bronchial tree is slowed and mucus more abundant.

“CDC Yellow Book 2020: Health Information for International Travel” by CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION. (CDC), Gary W. Brunette
from CDC Yellow Book 2020: Health Information for International Travel
by CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION. (CDC), Gary W. Brunette
OXFORD University Press, 2019

Previous studies have found associations between particulate air pollution and IUGR (Bobak et al., 2001; Dejmek et al., 1999).

“Handbook of Toxicology of Chemical Warfare Agents” by Ramesh C. Gupta
from Handbook of Toxicology of Chemical Warfare Agents
by Ramesh C. Gupta
Elsevier Science, 2009

Exposure of pregnant women to air pollution may lead to other adverse birth outcomes such as preterm delivery, intrauterine growth retardation, small head circumference, and increased rate of malformations (Dejmek et al., 1999; Bobak, 2000).

“Air Pollution: Health and Environmental Impacts” by Bhola R. Gurjar, Luisa T. Molina, C.S. P. Ojha
from Air Pollution: Health and Environmental Impacts
by Bhola R. Gurjar, Luisa T. Molina, C.S. P. Ojha
CRC Press, 2010

The observations that maternal asthma may increase the risk of perinatal complications is confirmed by one of the largest studies to date6 which described the outcomes of pregnancy in 36,985 women identified as having asthma in either the Swedish Medical Birth Registry and/or the Swedish Hospital Discharge Registry.

“Clinical Asthma E-Book” by Mario Castro, Monica Kraft
from Clinical Asthma E-Book
by Mario Castro, Monica Kraft
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2008

Finally, some studies suggest that transport-related air pollution has adverse outcomes on pregnancy, such as premature birth and low birth weight, but the available evidence is inconsistent.

“Health Effects of Transport-related Air Pollution” by Michal Krzyzanowski, Birgit Kuna-Dibbert, World Health Organization, Jürgen Schneider, World Health Organization. Regional Office for Europe
from Health Effects of Transport-related Air Pollution
by Michal Krzyzanowski, Birgit Kuna-Dibbert, et. al.
World Health Organization Europe, 2005

The risks of reproductive problems from exposure to pollutants are very important because the time between conception and a child’s birth is arguably the most vulnerable lifestage threatened by air pollution.

“Fundamentals of Air Pollution” by Daniel A. Vallero
from Fundamentals of Air Pollution
by Daniel A. Vallero
Elsevier Science, 2014

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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