Optimism May Propel Women to some Longer Existence

 

Propel Conversation Series: Personal Leadership Video 1

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Christine Caine: Rediscover What Really Matters | TBN

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Propel Conversation Series: Passion Video 1

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Let’s talk about social progress and optimism….

Video taken from the channel: Beau of the Fifth Column


 

Propel Women PASSION Session 4

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Women’s Wellness: Can optimism boost women’s lives?

Video taken from the channel: Mayo Clinic


 

Optimism may be the key to living a longer life

Video taken from the channel: Inside The Story


Optimism May Propel Women to a Longer Life Upbeat outlook linked to lower risk of dying from cancer, heart disease and other causes, study says From the WebMD Archives. WEDNESDAY, Dec. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News)—Women who generally believe that good things will happen may live longer.

That’s the suggestion of a new study. Optimism May Propel Women to a Longer Life Upbeat outlook linked to lower risk of dying from cancer, heart disease and other causes, study says Please note: This article was published more than one year ago. The facts and conclusions presented may have since changed and may no longer be accurate. WEDNESDAY, Dec.

7, 2016 (HealthDay News) Women who generally believe that good things will happen may live longer. That’s the suggestion of a new study that. Women who generally believe that good things will happen may live longer.

That’s the suggestion of a new study that seems to affirm the power of positive thinking. “This study shows that optimism is associated with reduced risk of death from stroke, respiratory disease, infection and cancer,” said Eric Kim, co-lead author of the investigation. For the most optimistic women, for instance, the risk of dying from cancer was 16 percent lower; the risk of dying from heart disease, stroke or respiratory disease was almost 40 percent lower; and the risk of dying from infection was 52 percent lower, the study found. Women who generally believe that good things will happen may live longer. That’s the suggestion of a new study that seems to affirm the power of positive thinking. “This study shows that optimism is associated with reduced risk of death from stroke, respiratory disease, infection and cancer,” said Eric Kim, co-lead author of the investigation. The following navigation utilizes arrow, enter, escape, and space bar key commands.

Left and right arrows move through main tier links and expand / close menus in sub tiers. Upbeat outlook linked to lower risk of dying from cancer, heart disease and other causes, study says. WEDNESDAY, Dec.

7, 2016 (HealthDay News) — Women who generally believe that good things will happen may live longer. That’s the suggestion of a new study that seems to affirm the power of positive thinking. “This study shows that optimism is associated with reduced risk of death from strok. The resulting effects were smaller – although still pronounced – with the most optimistic group of women having a 9% longer lifespan than the least optimistic.

The most optimistic fifth of.

List of related literature:

Pessimism then can become her way of life.

“The Optimistic Child: A Proven Program to Safeguard Children Against Depression and Build Lifelong Resilience” by Martin E. P. Seligman
from The Optimistic Child: A Proven Program to Safeguard Children Against Depression and Build Lifelong Resilience
by Martin E. P. Seligman
HMH Books, 2007

In 1850, Colombat de L’Isere, when discussing the “Change of Life,” wrote the following: “Compelled to yield to the power of time, women now cease to exist as for the species, and henceforward live only for themselves.”3 Fortunately, this pessimistic outlook about menopause has become outdated.

“Endocrinology E-Book: Adult and Pediatric” by J. Larry Jameson, Leslie J. De Groot
from Endocrinology E-Book: Adult and Pediatric
by J. Larry Jameson, Leslie J. De Groot
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

You will recall that beginning nuns who wrote happy autobiographies when in their twenties lived longer and healthier lives than novices whose autobiographies were devoid of positive emotion, and also that optimists in the Mayo Clinic study lived significantly longer than pessimists.

“Authentic Happiness: Using the New Positive Psychology to Realize Your Potential for Lasting Fulfillment” by Martin E. P. Seligman
from Authentic Happiness: Using the New Positive Psychology to Realize Your Potential for Lasting Fulfillment
by Martin E. P. Seligman
Free Press, 2002

Along with the death of friends, family, and other relatives, most aging women will eventually cope with widowhood.

“Women's Health Care in Advanced Practice Nursing” by Catherine Ingram Fogel, PhD, RNC, FAAN, Nancy Fugate Woods, PhD, RN, FAAN
from Women’s Health Care in Advanced Practice Nursing
by Catherine Ingram Fogel, PhD, RNC, FAAN, Nancy Fugate Woods, PhD, RN, FAAN
Springer Publishing Company, 2008

Here, researchers found evidence suggesting that pessimists have a shorter life span than that of their more hopeful counterparts.

“Thanks!: How the New Science of Gratitude Can Make You Happier” by Robert A. Emmons
from Thanks!: How the New Science of Gratitude Can Make You Happier
by Robert A. Emmons
Houghton Mifflin Company, 2007

This is a good thing, considering that a woman’s life expectancy has dramatically increased; at the turn of the nineteenth century, most women entered menopause in their midforties and their average life expectancy was only 51.

“Women's Herbs, Women's Health” by Christopher Hobbs, Kathi Keville
from Women’s Herbs, Women’s Health
by Christopher Hobbs, Kathi Keville
Book Publishing Company, 2007

This reality of ageing must be normalized for mature women to provide comfort and reassurance as well as to avoid a self-fulfilling prophecy.

“An Introduction to Gerontology” by Ian Stuart-Hamilton
from An Introduction to Gerontology
by Ian Stuart-Hamilton
Cambridge University Press, 2011

Disillusionment can occur in young adulthood (late twenties), as women perceive that life has failed to meet their expectations (Gramling & McCain 1997; Levinson 1996).

“Psychiatric & Mental Health Nursing E-Book” by Ruth Elder, Katie Evans, Debra Nizette
from Psychiatric & Mental Health Nursing E-Book
by Ruth Elder, Katie Evans, Debra Nizette
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

Women now expect to live one-third of their lives after menopause.

“Health Promotion Throughout the Life Span E-Book” by Carole Lium Edelman, Carol Lynn Mandle, Elizabeth C. Kudzma
from Health Promotion Throughout the Life Span E-Book
by Carole Lium Edelman, Carol Lynn Mandle, Elizabeth C. Kudzma
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

In other words, menopause may be a time when a woman is able to reevaluate her life choices and to perceive these choices as new opportunities rather than negative life events.

“Human Behavior in the Social Environment: Perspectives on Development, the Life Course, and Macro Contexts” by Anissa Taun Rogers
from Human Behavior in the Social Environment: Perspectives on Development, the Life Course, and Macro Contexts
by Anissa Taun Rogers
Taylor & Francis, 2016

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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15 comments

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  • Thank You Beau!
    You get me thinking about hope!

    This is an thinking intelligent human being!
    We definitely need more people like this in the world…. Now!

  • How do you reconcile that optimistic view with the fact that there were more leftists in the prewar era, the 20s and 30s, than now and the fact that the global and local left trended towards centralization, authoritarianism, anti-democratism, and anti-internationalism? Is it enough that the consensus moved toward the center after 4 generations? It seems to me like the hope isn’t generational, but might take 5 or 6 generations and that the best ideas are lost to history. It’s incredibly sad the amount of material harm that gets caused in these long periods and the loss of the good the most radical ideas could bring about.

  • Unfortunately, the human race is running out of time. The next pandemic doesn’t care how progressive we are and neither does climate change. Imagine the effects if the next pandemic is 1000 times more lethal than Covid19. Look up the “dry corridor” in Central America and then ask yourself what happens if the entire equatorial region becomes too hot for human survival.

  • This guy didn’t learn Marxism well. One of the few things that are correct in Marxism is that social progress follows economic, not the other way around. Hence, while this guy is correct about growing liberty on a long run, and correct that government is not the answer for more progress, he is ignorant for the true engine of the human progress economic freedom which by default limits the role of the government in economic activities.
    Unfortunately for him, leftists are the major factor in growing role of government in all aspects, therefore leftists are in fact regressive force, not progressive. One of the many words stolen and voided by leftists is progress. Other such words are freedom and liberty. Isn’t it strange that the true progressives, true liberty and freedom supporters had to call themselves libertarian?
    What leftists crowds lack is real economic knowledge, not the Keynessian BS though at school by their leftists professors. Once they read and understand the writings of Ludwig von Mises and other prominent Austrian school founders, then they will be able to rethink what is really progressive and why social progress and justice may only grow as result of economic independence from government, about the only think this guy got right.

  • Good morning ��, Christine you are such an encouragement. Keep going for Jesus. Praying for you and your family. You are such a blessing to the Body of Christ. ������

  • Thing is though and love ur channel. Masks are a statement but should be common sense and respect. It’s so divided and the people at the top want their money no matter how much harm it does

  • It can happen even quicker for small changes. In UK the Anglican church had a vote for permitting women to become priests.
    It was defeated, 10 years later it passed.
    Not even a generation, just a little more time for discussion and a few younger people to come into the field of influence.
    There were also concessions to those who would not accept the female priests and later bishops.

  • So if we go by this logic, then Capitalism will finally fall after only about 400 years, and class injustice will be a thing of the past after oh, several thousand. We just might reach enlightenment some time before our sun explodes? Oh shit, climate change……so much for that.

  • Yes, I see this happening for transgender people like me. I feel it is my “calling” to be “visible” as a trans person so people can come to know people like me in a positive way. Prior generations of trans folk made this possible for me and my generation, and I am helping to make this easier for trans people (and other marginalized people) after me. ��❤

  • #StayAtHomeStrike

    You may hear these words before and you may have not.

    You may care or you may not.

    I hear you and I care.

    One for all and all for one.

    There are no companies and no government without we the people of the world.

    We are many, we are the people of the world.

  • beau is a great example of two things: people who learn from history and the smart man learns from his mistakes, the wise man learns from the mistakes of others.

  • Social Conservatives need to know that the only thing in the world that doesn’t change is the fact that everything always changes.

  • So true! We need to remind ourselves of this.
    Steven Pinkers book “The Better Angels Of Our Nature, why violence has declined”
    was a massive eye opener for me. I’ve always been kind of positive, but that book gave me a cause for being it.

  • “Limiting dependance on the government” is one of two main neoliberal talking points to excuse their austerity measures. (The other excuse is pretending we don’t have the resources rather than lack of the political will; “How are we going to pay for that?”) How would you explain your advocacy for being less dependant on the government and the need for a stronger safety net?

    Do you mean that with an effective safety net people can get back up and off the safety net?

  • Three weeks later, and so much has changed! As of today, tangibly and officially for the better!!! I heard a great quote today, a great thought to contemplate from an unwaveringly hopeful woman working tirelessly with others to change horrid conditions in her part of the world. She was asked, “How do you stay so optimistic?” Her reply, “We cannot afford the luxury of pessimism.”