Opioids More and more Associated with Deaths of Women That Are Pregnant

 

The Opioid Crisis

Video taken from the channel: Demystifying Medicine


 

Opioid Addiction during Pregnancy

Video taken from the channel: All Health TV


 

ME: 5 More Deaths Linked To Potent Opioid

Video taken from the channel: WCCO CBS Minnesota


 

Synthetic opioids drive spike in U.S. fatal drug overdoses

Video taken from the channel: MDedge: news and insights for busy physicians


 

Opioid Use in Pregnancy: A Community’s Approach, The CHARM Collaborative

Video taken from the channel: SAMHSA


 

Opiate Addiction in Pregnancy Jonathan Weeks, M.D., DABAM

Video taken from the channel: Norton Healthcare


 

Opioid Use in Pregnancy and Neonatal Opioid Withdrawal

Video taken from the channel: Children’s Healthcare Canada


Opioids Increasingly Tied to Deaths of Pregnant Women. TUESDAY, Nov. 20, 2018 As the U.S. opioid epidemic rages unchecked, new research shows that pregnancy-related deaths due to opioid misuse more than doubled between 2007 and 2016.

Deaths during or soon after pregnancy rose 34 percent during that time, and the percentage involving heroin, fentanyl or prescription painkillers (such as. The vast majority of opioid-related deaths in the study group (70 percent) occurred either during pregnancy or within 42 days after terminating a pregnancy, according to the new report. Also, the underlying class of drugs implicated in a pregnant woman’s death shifted over the decade, with fewer fatalities involving methadone. Opioids increasingly tied to deaths of pregnant women by Alan Mozes, Healthday Reporter (HealthDay)—As the U.S. opioid epidemic rages unchecked, new research shows that pregnancy-related deaths due.

Across the country, the number of pregnant women addicted to opioids more than quadrupled from 1999 to 2014, according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The analysis, published. As an example, for mothers, opioid use disorder has been linked to maternal death 1,2; for babies, opioid use disorder or long-term opioid use has been linked to poor fetal growth, preterm birth, stillbirth, specific birth defects, and neonatal abstinence syndrome (see below) 3,4. The effects of prenatal opioid exposure on children over time are largely unknown.

In some cases, pregnant women with opioid use disorder may also be prescribed opioids. “Buprenorphine or methadone is prescribed as medication for opioid use disorder. Methadone and Buprenorphine Can Effectively Treat Opioid Use Disorder During Pregnancy. Methadone has been used to treat pregnant women with opioid use disorder since the 1970s and was recognized as the standard of care by 1998. 1,4 Since then, studies have shown that buprenorphine is also an effective treatment option. 10 The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the.

Opioid medications, commonly called narcotics, are derived from the poppy plant. Some opioids are available as prescription medications. While these medications are an important option for managing pain, repetitive use can lead to dependence, physical tolerance, craving, inability to control use and continued use despite harmful consequences (opioid use disorder). Opioid use disorder during pregnancy has been linked with serious negative health outcomes for pregnant women and developing babies, including preterm birth, stillbirth, maternal mortality, and neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS).

Opioids Increasingly Tied to Deaths of Pregnant Women “Overdose deaths continue to be unacceptably high, and targeted efforts are needed to reduce the number of deaths.

List of related literature:

Women who take chronic opioids during pregnancy are at risk for tolerance, and the neonate is at risk for opioid withdrawal syndrome.

“Chestnut's Obstetric Anesthesia E-Book” by David H. Chestnut, Cynthia A Wong, Lawrence C Tsen, Warwick D Ngan Kee, Yaakov Beilin, Jill Mhyre, Brian T. Bateman, Naveen Nathan
from Chestnut’s Obstetric Anesthesia E-Book
by David H. Chestnut, Cynthia A Wong, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Medical withdrawal of the pregnant patient from opioids is not recommended because of the high rate of relapse, which exposes the mother to increased risk and also increases the likelihood of fetal intrauterine death.

“Pain Medicine Board Review” by Marc A. Huntoon
from Pain Medicine Board Review
by Marc A. Huntoon
Oxford University Press, 2017

Opioids During pregnancy, 1% of women report opiate use and as many as 4% test positive for opiates.138 Because there is no known teratogenic effect of maternal opiates on the fetus, the goals of treating opiate dependence during pregnancy are to minimize maternal and neonatal morbidity.

“Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies E-Book” by Steven G. Gabbe, Jennifer R. Niebyl, Henry L Galan, Eric R. M. Jauniaux, Mark B Landon, Joe Leigh Simpson, Deborah A Driscoll
from Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies E-Book
by Steven G. Gabbe, Jennifer R. Niebyl, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

Although some of the direct effects of opiates remain unclear, what is clear is that opiate use in pregnancy causes neonatal abstinence syndrome and that a majority of neonates born to regular opiate users will go through some form of withdrawal (Hayes & Brown, 2012; Ko et al.,

“Handbook of Infant Mental Health, Fourth Edition” by Charles H. Zeanah
from Handbook of Infant Mental Health, Fourth Edition
by Charles H. Zeanah
Guilford Publications, 2018

Pregnancy outcome in women who use opiates.

“Handbook of Pediatric Neuropsychology” by Andrew S. Davis, PhD, Rik Carl D'Amato
from Handbook of Pediatric Neuropsychology
by Andrew S. Davis, PhD, Rik Carl D’Amato
Springer Publishing Company, 2010

Opioid abuse or dependence reportedly affects 0.4% to 1.0% of all pregnancies.

“Faust's Anesthesiology Review E-Book” by Mayo Foundation for Medical Education
from Faust’s Anesthesiology Review E-Book
by Mayo Foundation for Medical Education
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

The opioids are also distributed to the fetus in pregnant women, accounting for the respiratory depression produced in the fetus when the mother is given opioids near term.

“Applied Pharmacology for the Dental Hygienist E-Book” by Elena Bablenis Haveles
from Applied Pharmacology for the Dental Hygienist E-Book
by Elena Bablenis Haveles
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2014

Regular use of opioids during pregnancy may

“Saunders Comprehensive Review for the NCLEX-RN® Examination E-Book” by Linda Anne Silvestri, Angela Elizabeth Silvestri
from Saunders Comprehensive Review for the NCLEX-RN® Examination E-Book
by Linda Anne Silvestri, Angela Elizabeth Silvestri
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Regular use of opioids during pregnancy may produce neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.

“Mosby's Drug Reference for Health Professions E-Book” by Mosby
from Mosby’s Drug Reference for Health Professions E-Book
by Mosby
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

This study has led to increased use of buprenorphine to treat opiate dependence in pregnancy.

“Creasy and Resnik's Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Principles and Practice” by Robert Resnik, MD, Robert K. Creasy, MD, Jay D. Iams, MD, Charles J. Lockwood, MD, MHCM, Thomas Moore, MD, Michael F Greene, MD
from Creasy and Resnik’s Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Principles and Practice
by Robert Resnik, MD, Robert K. Creasy, MD, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2013

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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3 comments

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  • I have chronic pain in my back. I’ve served my country in the military and now I suffer every day. I’m not saying that nothing needs to be done however coming down on doctors is not the answer. Why should I suffer because others that don’t need the drugs I take abuse them. I’m being punished for their actions. I used to be on oxycodone 30s. I stopped using them long enough for my tolerance to drop and now I’m on 15s. However my doctor has told me due to government involvement he cannot up my dose to 20s so I am suffering because it’s time for my medication to be increased and my doctor can’t because some asshole in a high paying government position has decided what’s best for my healthcare. It’s rediculose at best. It’s criminal at the least. Please find another way to deal with drug abusers. My suffering isn’t the answer. It’s not fair to me or millions of others

  • Do you want viable patients in horrifying pain to now have to use heroin? Well then you Quacks are getting your wish! Cut with Chinese Fentanyl!

  • So, why’s that in North America. There are people in ohter parts of the world too but no one talks about a Russian or European opioid crisis. What’s so special about those places that there is none?