Opioid Addiction some risk After Weight-Loss Surgery

 

Former addict hammers home dangers of opioid painkillers

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Bariatric Surgery after Drug & Alcohol Abuse Webinar

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Cross Addiction after Weight Loss Surgery

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REGAINING WEIGHT AFTER WEIGHT LOSS SURGERY ● VSG & RNY GASTRIC SLEEVE SURGERY TIPS

Video taken from the channel: My Level 10 Life


 

ALCOHOLISM AFTER WEIGHT LOSS SURGERY

Video taken from the channel: Kimberly H


 

ALCOHOL AFTER WEIGHT LOSS SURGERY ● CROSS ADDICTION ● VSG & RNY

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‘Opioid-Sparing Strategy’ For Surgery Lowers Risk For Addiction

Video taken from the channel: CBS Boston


Opioid Addiction a Risk After Weight-Loss Surgery Patients were 46 percent more likely than after general surgery to take painkillers a year later From the WebMD Archives. TUESDAY, Oct. 24, 2017 People who turn to surgery in their struggle with obesity may be more vulnerable to opioid dependence after their procedure, new research suggests. Long-term use of these powerful yet highly addictive painkillers is more common after weight-loss surgery than after general surgery. TUESDAY, Oct.

24, 2017 (HealthDay News) People who turn to surgery in their struggle with obesity may be more vulnerable to opioid dependence after their procedure, new research suggests. Long-term use of these powerful yet highly addictive painkillers is more common after weight-loss surgery than after general surgery. Opioid Addiction a Danger After Weight-Loss Surgery.

Patients were 46 percent more likely than after general surgery to take painkillers a year later. Please note: This article was published more. Opioid Addiction a Danger After Weight-Loss Surgery Piedmont HealthCare.

TUESDAY, Oct. 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) — People who turn to surgery in their struggle with obesity may be more vulnerable to opioid dependence after their procedure, new research suggests. Long-term use of these powerful yet highly addictive painkillers is more common after weight-loss surgery than after general surgery.

Opioid Addiction a Danger After Weight-Loss Surgery TUESDAY, Oct. 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) People who turn to surgery in their struggle with obesity may be more vulnerable to opioid dependence after. In the new study, breast and tummy tuck procedures had the highest risk of opioid addiction. These patients were more likely to become addicted after using the painkillers after surgery. We follow with a discussion of the risk factors that are associated with chronic opioid use after surgery and proceed with an analysis of the extent to which opioid-sparing perioperative interventions (eg, nerve blockade) have been shown to reduce the risk of chronic opioid use after surgery.

WEDNESDAY, April 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) Some surgery patients prescribed opioids for post-operative pain relief may face a high risk for developing a long-term opioid addiction. Opioid-free pain management after surgery. Following surgery, less severe pain can be treated with prescription doses of non-addictive pain medicine.

Some opioid-free drugs can also be combined to provide optimal pain relief. Opioid-free medications for pain relief after surgery.

List of related literature:

However, when a dose of naltrexone lower than that generally used to treat alcohol or opioid addiction is combined in obese subjects with a dose of bupropion in the general range used to treat depression or for smoking cessation, the combination treatment produces greater weight loss than either monotherapy alone.

“Stahl's Essential Psychopharmacology: Neuroscientific Basis and Practical Applications” by Stephen M. Stahl, Nancy Muntner
from Stahl’s Essential Psychopharmacology: Neuroscientific Basis and Practical Applications
by Stephen M. Stahl, Nancy Muntner
Cambridge University Press, 2013

Bariatric patients are also at increased risk for resedation because many anaesthetic drugs are lipophilic and metabolised more slowly by obese patients.

“Critical Care Nursing” by Leanne Aitken, Andrea Marshall, Wendy Chaboyer
from Critical Care Nursing
by Leanne Aitken, Andrea Marshall, Wendy Chaboyer
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

This is particularly true in patients being considered for Rouxen-Y gastric bypass for the following reason: A. These patients are at increased risk for substance relapse following surgery compared to other bariatric procedures.

“The ASMBS Textbook of Bariatric Surgery” by Ninh T. Nguyen, Stacy A. Brethauer, John M. Morton, Jaime Ponce, Raul J. Rosenthal
from The ASMBS Textbook of Bariatric Surgery
by Ninh T. Nguyen, Stacy A. Brethauer, et. al.
Springer International Publishing, 2019

As long as weight loss is more than 5% and/or the patient’s comorbidities have improved, the drug may be continued.

“Handbook of Obesity Treatment” by Thomas A. Wadden, Albert J. Stunkard
from Handbook of Obesity Treatment
by Thomas A. Wadden, Albert J. Stunkard
Guilford Publications, 2004

Intravenously administered sufentanil, and theoreticallyanylipid-soluble opioid, is eliminated slowly in obese patients, and the anesthesia provider should consider reduction of the

“Chestnut's Obstetric Anesthesia: Principles and Practice” by David H. Chestnut, Linda S Polley, Cynthia A Wong, Lawrence C Tsen
from Chestnut’s Obstetric Anesthesia: Principles and Practice
by David H. Chestnut, Linda S Polley, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2009

Endogenous opioids may contribute to the eventual denial of hunger in clients with the disorder, and this is supported in some studies reporting weight gain after receiving opiate antagonists.

“Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing for Canadian Practice” by Wendy Austin, Mary Ann Boyd
from Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing for Canadian Practice
by Wendy Austin, Mary Ann Boyd
Wolters Kluwer/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2010

Pre-screening could follow current bariatric surgery protocols and the follow-up could look for transfer of addiction and/or weight regain, as either could be indicative of psychological disorders.

“Fasting: an Exceptional Human Experience” by Randi Fredricks
from Fasting: an Exceptional Human Experience
by Randi Fredricks
AuthorHouse, 2012

Chronic pain often leads to an abuse of opioids, decreased appetite, weight loss, and poor quality of life; it is also the most common reason for surgery in people with this disease.

“Pathology for the Physical Therapist Assistant E-Book” by Catherine C. Goodman, Kenda S. Fuller
from Pathology for the Physical Therapist Assistant E-Book
by Catherine C. Goodman, Kenda S. Fuller
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

Opioid abusers present different challenges, and the withdrawal syndrome is not life threatening.

“Peterson's Principles of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery” by Michael Miloro, Larry J. Peterson
from Peterson’s Principles of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
by Michael Miloro, Larry J. Peterson
People’s Medical Publishing House-USA, 2012

The research supporting the link between the dopamine and opioid pathways with eating has helped open up new treatments for obesity and food addiction, by using drugs already proven successful in treatment of substance abuse.

“Behavioral Addictions: Criteria, Evidence, and Treatment” by Kenneth Paul Rosenberg, MD, Laura Curtiss Feder, PsyD
from Behavioral Addictions: Criteria, Evidence, and Treatment
by Kenneth Paul Rosenberg, MD, Laura Curtiss Feder, PsyD
Elsevier Science, 2014

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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18 comments

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  • Really appreciate your honesty. I don’t have an addition but I did go through a time where I would drink a glass of wine or 2 or 3. When I felt myself getting out of control I pulled it back in. I agree it is easy to replace one addition with a new one. Thank you for your transparency.

  • Alcoholism is serious issue and needs to be remedy real fast. Find an AA group nearby. I might have think seriously of ensuring that I keep my sobriety if I have the surgery.

  • Thank you for making and sharing this video. It is so true. I am 15 years out from my WLS and I still struggle to keep my eating in check. I’ve gained and lost 25 pounds (several times over) after losing my initial 100 pounds. The struggle certainly is real and addiction is real in so many forms.

  • My friend!! Today I make 4 months post op. Almost 55 lbs down. Went for a follow up today as well. Everyone is very impressed with my progress and results. Dr and Nurse told me I’m an inspiration. After a near death head on collision 3 1/2 years ago I have several permanent injuries throughout my body and spine. After 3 1/2 years after the accident and having 4 surgeries related to it and given over 45 medications for all my conditions I gained almost 45 lbs. I couldn’t drop the weight and I did all types of hormone and blood work exams couldn’t find why I kept gaining and gaining weight. Found out after feeling really sick with the stomach and throwing up acid.. found out I developed gastritis and liver disease related to the high amount of medications I was prescribed.

    Today I don’t take any medications. Not even asthma medication. My drs are impressed due to all the issues I have had.

    I was also told that I wasn’t heavy enough to do the surgery and last minute after 6 months of doing the process they finally approved me the day before surgery.

    I stay away from alcohol… one there’s a few alcoholics in my family.. I grew up with one of them. Two my body cannot handle alcohol anymore. I wasn’t a big drinker before would drink a glass or two of wine during a celebration or get together. I even stopped that a year before my surgery. And being a spiritual worker I felt it wasn’t adding anything positive to my health or body or helping me with my practice. And I only drank maybe 5-8 times a year if that.

    I see many of my friends who became obsessed with shopping. I was a minimalist and now I’m an extreme minimalist. I gave away and sold approximately 95% of my things. 100% debt free. I’m now planning for early retirement and investing. Although I listen to Dave Ramsey. I realized that I had done all the steps he teaches except the last one ( which is where I am now) before I even came across him or his teachings. Pretty wild.

    We got this!! I’m glad you have recovered and are living a really positive lifestyle and for keeping it real.. much Love & Happy 2020!!! Woot woot

  • I was literally going to make a similar video on my 5 months postop update. I’ve noticed that I crave alcohol more than food these days. Thank you for making this video, it’s really inspiring and it’s keeping me in check. ������

  • I haven’t had WLS but I still binge! Been Keto for two years. Lost 52 pounds but am struggling right now. My cross addiction is spending money…shopping. UGH! You are a blessing. Thank you.

  • I am in recovery also and facing wls I am a year off smoking I just feel this is my last addition 1st herion/alcohol then 2nd cigarettes now food addiction just ready to change my way of think tyvm for your channel I luv your story God bless

  • I hope you will message me, I had gastric bypass in 2012 and my mom died in 2013 and I started drinking heavily and then I got married in 2014, I’ve been addicted since and can’t stop

  • My surgeon told me there was no such thing as transfer addiction. Yet here I am 6 years post op. 40 pounds less than pre op wt. Drinking more than I have in my life.

  • Thank you for sharing your journey with us, I know it is not easy to sit up there and expose parts of your life that you are not proud of. I had my surgery two and a half weeks ago. I had the stomach staple surgery in 1986. I was not able to follow up with my doctor because we moved to another state. This surgery was still new and not many people knew about it. I lost the weight. I did not really have any type of diet. I remember living on a Cheetos and cheeseball. There was little I could eat. I was very nauseous. I am now 70 and just had the bypass two weeks ago. I have already cheated. Your video has helped me a lot. I am going to follow up with your videos and take in all you can teach me. Again thank you for sharing.

  • I am so glad you got it under control. Alcoholism and drug abuse is what I grew up with in my family. I’ve seen it all. Rather than do drugs or drink, I ate. Just as bad.:(

  • You and I are twins. You express it so beautifully. Your words resonate so strongly with me. I can’t express as well as you. Yet. Let’s promise to hang in there.

  • Thank you for this video. It can be so helpful for people. My sister is having surgery soon. I am going to tell her about your channel.

  • I agree with you. My sister had gastric bypass around 2000. She was a physician recruiter in my home town. She owned her own home and was taking good care of her two kids. After surgery she became an alcoholic and started using meth. She lost everything. Her kids were taken away she lost her house and car. She ended up in prison for a few years and she’s struggling to get her life back. I believe the surgery is what started it all. She never had those problems when she weighed 300 lbs. Her addiction was food.

  • Thank you for sharing your story I’m supposed to have a consultation about sleeve I had a stroke in 2013 I have been stroke free for 7 years before I had the stroke I was battling alcoholism and I had the stroke and it made me wake up I have two kids and I wouldn’t want to leave here knowing where my kids are going to end up God is so good thank you

  • I literally JUST filmed my cross addiction video for my WLS series.
    I love you and how much heart and realness you share here on this channel

  • These WLS videos are great! Fortunately, I have not (yet?) succumbed to a cross addiction, but I can see how easily it could happen. Been going through some rough times with my mom’s health and I find myself wanting to eat everything and anything. I control myself, but then find myself online browsing and thinking how easy it would be to counter my feelings of stress and frustration with retail therapy. I think your videos should be required viewing for pre-surgical people. They could definitely help some people avoid pitfalls post surgery and to better inform them of what real life is like living with their new tool. I’m so grateful for you and your channel. Thank you!❤