Only Factor Certain About Flu Season You ought to get Your Shot

 

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Only Thing Certain About Flu Season: You Need to Get Your Shot. TUESDAY, Sept. 24, 2019 Although no one knows yet how severe this flu season will be, now is the time to get vaccinated, health officials say.

Only thing certain about flu season: you need to get your shot. by Steven Reinberg, Healthday Reporter. By Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter. TUESDAY, Sept. 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) Although no one knows yet how severe this flu season will be, now is the time to get vaccinated, health officials say..

Already this season, a 4-year-old from California who recently died tested positive for influenza, local health officials reported earlier this month.. The child did have underlying health. Share on Pinterest Getting your flu shot can help protect you from getting sick this fall.

Getty Images Getty Images A new study found that 1 in 8 people hospitalized with the flu. With flu season fast approaching, health experts have emphasized that this year, more than ever, it’s important to get vaccinated for the flu. There are many vaccine options to choose from this. Aaron Perry, who lives in Roanoke, said he probably won’t get the flu shot this year. “I’m not going to get one because, you know, I’m healthy.

I do what I need to do. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends getting a flu shot in September or October. While flu season can last well into late spring, it typically ramps up in the fall and peaks between December and February.

After getting the flu shot, it takes about two weeks to build up antibodies. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that everyone age 6 months and older get a flu shot. Flu shots work: In the 2018-19 US flu season, the vaccine averted more than 4.

Dr. Karen Muratore wants you to get a flu shot this year — especially this year. But not right away.

Although the flu vaccine won’t keep you from getting COVID-19, it could keep you. Getting a flu shot not only reduces the odds of getting sick, it often means a less severe illness. In addition, evidence from last spring shows that it may be possible to get both coronavirus and.

List of related literature:

The best time to receive the flu vaccine is in the fall, preferably during October or November (flu season can start as early as October and continue through May).

“Diseases and Disorders” by Marshall Cavendish Corporation
from Diseases and Disorders
by Marshall Cavendish Corporation
Marshall Cavendish, 2007

That’s because the flu shot (or the nasal-spray flu vaccine) is recommended each year in the fall or winter—and is widely discussed by the media each flu season.

“What to Expect: The Second Year” by Heidi Murkoff
from What to Expect: The Second Year
by Heidi Murkoff
Simon & Schuster UK, 2012

The yearly flu shot helps to prevent getting sick during the winter months, because the flu can cause serious illness, and even death, in the elderly.

“Prioritization & Clinical Judgment for NCLEX-RN” by Christi Doherty
from Prioritization & Clinical Judgment for NCLEX-RN
by Christi Doherty
F.A. Davis, 2020

Because the strain of influenza virus is different every year, annual vaccination is recommended (usually in October or November); each time a flu vaccine is administered, the nurse should inform the client of any updated information regarding the vaccine.

“Saunders Canadian Comprehensive Review for the NCLEX-RN” by Linda Anne Silvestri
from Saunders Canadian Comprehensive Review for the NCLEX-RN
by Linda Anne Silvestri
Elsevier Health Sciences Division, 2016

Many people get a flu shot (vaccine) each year to protect them from the influenza virus.

“Microbiology: A Clinical Approach” by Anthony Strelkauskas, Angela Edwards, Beatrix Fahnert, Greg Pryor, Jennifer Strelkauskas
from Microbiology: A Clinical Approach
by Anthony Strelkauskas, Angela Edwards, et. al.
CRC Press, 2015

Getting a yearly flu shot is still the best way of avoiding the disease entirely.

“PDR Pocket Guide to Prescription Drugs, 9th Edition” by Pocket Books
from PDR Pocket Guide to Prescription Drugs, 9th Edition
by Pocket Books
Pocket Books, 2009

Influenza vaccine is often offered during the fall and winter.

“Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women's Health Nursing” by Sharon Smith Murray, MSN, RN, C, Emily Slone McKinney, MSN, RN, C
from Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women’s Health Nursing
by Sharon Smith Murray, MSN, RN, C, Emily Slone McKinney, MSN, RN, C
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2013

The flu vaccine must be taken prior to each flu season – or at least early in the season – for best protection.

“What to Expect When You're Expecting 4th Edition” by Heidi Murkoff, Sharon Mazel
from What to Expect When You’re Expecting 4th Edition
by Heidi Murkoff, Sharon Mazel
Simon & Schuster UK, 2010

Obtaining a flu shot at least once a year, usually in the fall, is important.

“Marathon: The Ultimate Training Guide” by Hal Higdon
from Marathon: The Ultimate Training Guide
by Hal Higdon
Rodale Books, 2005

Because of the changing nature of the virus, yearly immunization is necessary and in the United States is given in early fall before the flu season begins.

“Public Health Nursing E-Book: Population-Centered Health Care in the Community” by Marcia Stanhope, Jeanette Lancaster
from Public Health Nursing E-Book: Population-Centered Health Care in the Community
by Marcia Stanhope, Jeanette Lancaster
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • Many studies suggest increased risk of viral respiratory infections, including coronavirus, following vaccination for influenza.
    # A January 2020 US Pentagon study (Wolff 2020) found that the flu shot INCREASES the risks from coronavirus by 36%. “Receiving influenza vaccination may increase the risk of other respiratory viruses, a phenomenon known as “virus interference…’vaccine derived’ virus interference was significantly associated with coronavirus…”
    # A 2018 CDC study (Rikin et al 2018) found that flu shots increase the risk of non-flu acute respiratory illnesses (ARIs), including coronavirus, in children.
    # A 2011 Australian study (Kelly et al 2011) found that flu shots doubled the risk for non-flu viral lung infections.
    # A 2012 Hong Kong study (Cowling et al 2012) found that flu shots increase the risk for non-flu respiratory infections by 4.4 times.
    # A 2017 study (Mawson et al 2017) found vaccinated children were 5.9 times more likely to suffer pneumonia than their unvaccinated peers.

  • The first and last time I got a flu shot it sent me into a relapse with my C diff 60 days mandatory Hospital quarantine which would make the covid19 14 day quarantine look like Child’s Play. Being hooked up to ivy having pain med shot through the IV the vomiting and crapping out blood no thank you get your shots.