Obamacare Boosting Cancer Of The Breast Screening Among Poor

 

Demystifying Breast Cancer Screening in 12 Minutes | McFarland Clinic

Video taken from the channel: McFarland Clinic


 

Breast Cancer Screening and Prevention: A Clinician’s Perspective

Video taken from the channel: University of California Television (UCTV)


 

Debate Over New Guidelines for Breast Cancer Screening

Video taken from the channel: VOA Learning English


 

Obamacare boosts breast cancer screening

Video taken from the channel: Wochit Politics


 

FDA proposes changes to breast cancer screening

Video taken from the channel: CBS This Morning


 

Mammography and Breast Cancer Screening Guidelines

Video taken from the channel: HenryFordTV


 

The Latina Initiative: Reducing Disparities in Breast Cancer Screening

Video taken from the channel: Kaiser Permanente Thrive


MONDAY, Nov. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) More poor women are being screened for breast cancer due to expanded Medicaid coverage under the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, a new study finds. States now have the option to expand Medicaid coverage of breast cancer screening to people younger than 65 whose income is up to 133 percent of the. MONDAY, Nov. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) More poor women are being screened for breast cancer due to expanded Medicaid coverage under the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, a new study finds.

States now have the option to expand Medicaid coverage of breast cancer screening to people younger than 65 whose income is up to 133. Obamacare Boosts Breast Cancer Screening Rates. Waiving costs appears to improve mammography rates, but not colonoscopy, even among the poor.

ObamaCare Improves Breast Cancer Screening in Poor Women, Says Study By Jon Yaneff, CNP December 1, 2015. Obamacare Boosts Breast Cancer Screening, Study Finds. Waiving costs appears to improve mammography rates, but not colonoscopy, even among the poor. Please note: This article was published more than one year ago.

The facts and conclusions presented may have since changed and may no longer be accurate. And “More information” links may no longer work. The breast cancer screening gap between wealthy and poor Medicare recipients did narrow, the researchers found. Before passage of the ACA, the poorest women were 13 percent less likely to get. The U.S.

Preventive Services Task Force an expert panel that advises the federal government has this advice for women at average risk of breast cancer: Get a screening mammogram every two. Only 22 percent of uninsured women aged 40-64 received a mammogram in the past year, compared to 54 percent of insured women. Additionally, even relatively small out-of-pocket costs can significantly reduce mammography rates, particularly for lowincome women.

The Affordable Care Act: Increasing Access to Screening. Background. Although the percentage of women who initiate breast cancer screening is rising, the rate of continued adherence is poor. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a tailored print intervention compared with a non-tailored print intervention for increasing the breast cancer screening rate among a non-adherent. The Affordable Care Act: How It Helps People With Cancer and Their Families The health care law known as the Affordable Care Act (ACA) includes protections for patients and their families.

People have choices for getting affordable and understandable health care.

List of related literature:

More generally, Obamacare has enabled millions of women to receive preventive screenings, including mammograms and Pap tests, that they might not have been able to afford before (Gunja et al. 2017).

“Health, Illness, and Society: An Introduction to Medical Sociology” by Steven E. Barkan
from Health, Illness, and Society: An Introduction to Medical Sociology
by Steven E. Barkan
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2020

Breast cancer screening cost study.

“Applied Methods of Cost-Benefit Analysis in Health Care” by Emma McIntosh, Philip Clarke, Emma Frew, Jordan Louviere
from Applied Methods of Cost-Benefit Analysis in Health Care
by Emma McIntosh, Philip Clarke, et. al.
OUP Oxford, 2010

Unfortunately, high deductible plans may discourage individuals from getting preventive screenings like mammograms, Pap smears, and colorectal screening, in an effort to avoid depleting the savings account.

“Basics of Health Care Performance Improvement: A Lean Six Sigma Approach” by Donald Lighter
from Basics of Health Care Performance Improvement: A Lean Six Sigma Approach
by Donald Lighter
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2011

On the benefit side, breast tumors are detected earlier by screening, which should allow for a more conservative treatment.

“Encyclopedia of Cancer” by Manfred Schwab
from Encyclopedia of Cancer
by Manfred Schwab
Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2011

Tailored supplemental screening for breast cancer: what now and what next?

“Integrative Medicine E-Book” by David Rakel
from Integrative Medicine E-Book
by David Rakel
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

Screening for cervical and breast cancer: Is obesity an unrecognized barrier to preventive care?

“Nutrition in the Prevention and Treatment of Disease” by Carol J. Boushey, Ann M. Coulston, Cheryl L. Rock, Elaine Monsen
from Nutrition in the Prevention and Treatment of Disease
by Carol J. Boushey, Ann M. Coulston, et. al.
Elsevier Science, 2001

The study showed that 12.3 percent of uninsured women compared to 7.3 percent of privately insured women were initially diagnosed with advanced breast cancer (or cancer that had spread beyond mammary lymph nodes, chest wall, subcutaneous tissue, or overlying skin; p < 0.001).

“Vulnerable Populations in the United States” by Leiyu Shi, Gregory Stevens
from Vulnerable Populations in the United States
by Leiyu Shi, Gregory Stevens
Wiley, 2010

The Breast and Cervical Cancer Treatment Act gave poor, uninsured women access to the Medicaid program to pay the cost of treatment.

“Bathsheba's Breast: Women, Cancer, and History” by James S. Olson
from Bathsheba’s Breast: Women, Cancer, and History
by James S. Olson
Johns Hopkins University Press, 2005

But Medicare officials rejected the advice and have continued to cover annual mammograms from age 40 onward.

“Medicare For Dummies” by Patricia Barry
from Medicare For Dummies
by Patricia Barry
Wiley, 2013

National Cancer Institute: States that require health plans to cover patient care costs in clinical trials.

“Abeloff's Clinical Oncology E-Book” by Martin D. Abeloff, James O. Armitage, John E. Niederhuber, Michael B. Kastan, W. Gillies McKenna
from Abeloff’s Clinical Oncology E-Book
by Martin D. Abeloff, James O. Armitage, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2008

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

View all posts

Add comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *